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  1. #1
    darkened dreams labyrinthine's Avatar
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    Default Sensor Intelligence

    Another thread suggested the usefulness of starting this one.

    What are some areas of intelligence ideally suited to Sensing functions?

    Mechanical intelligence is an obvious one, but i was also wondering if having a photographic memory could be an example of Sensory genius? There is also a kind of kinesthetic intelligence seen in athletes: that is, having immediacy in interacting with ones body, having an (dare I say it...) intuitive feel for how the body is capable of acting. There is also an aspect of artisan intelligence: that is, knowing how to combine elements of the concrete world to create sensory pleasure as in cutlery, sound, visual objects, dance, etc.

    The aspects of Sensory intelligence as I understand them are:

    1. Ability to trouble shoot, solve problems, and create using concrete elements in the external world.

    2. The ability to remember and amass a great many details.

    3. The ability to distill information and an activity down to those elements most practical and of immediate use.

    What say ye?
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  2. #2
    Wait, what? Varelse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by toonia View Post
    1. Ability to trouble shoot, solve problems, and create using concrete elements in the external world.

    2. The ability to remember and amass a great many details.

    3. The ability to distill information and an activity down to those elements most practical and of immediate use.

    What say ye?
    Those sound appropriate, espescially 3.

    Naturalistic intelligence could also be a Sensor strength. And artistic intelligence I can certainly see-my mother has knowledge of decorating, floral arrangement, etc, and does a good job with all of it.

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  3. #3
    insert random title here Randomnity's Avatar
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    Intelligence, according to wikipedia, is the ability to reason, plan, solve problems, think abstractly, comprehend ideas and abilities, and learn.

    Sensors are perfectly able to do any of that (even think abstractly--preference is not the same thing as ability, even if the two often correlate). There's really no need for separate intelligence descriptions for intuitives and sensors....isn't it more how that intelligence is applied/directed that makes a difference?

    The traits you describe don't really seem like intelligence to me, but instead useful skills/common sense things arguably more common in sensors...your points seem reasonable in general, I just see them as separate from intelligence. With the exception of your first point, but hopefully problem solving (and common sense for that matter) isn't limited to sensors!

    What I would be more interested in seeing is a side-to-side comparison of how sensors and intuitives prefer to direct their intelligence.

  4. #4
    Senior Member raincrow007's Avatar
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    I really hope pt jumps into this thread.

  5. #5
    Plumage and Moult proteanmix's Avatar
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    This is how the AMERICAN ASSOCIATION ON INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES defines intelligence and some others from a general search.

    I'd think that a way to distinguish sensor intelligence from intuitive intelligence is to first understand what intelligence is generally and Randomnity suggested. You can whittle away at it from there.

    Does this definition of intelligence seem to be more skewed to sensor intelligence? I don't know, it seems like basic life skills to me.


    What is Intelligence?
    Intelligence refers to a general mental capability. It involves the ability to reason, plan, solve problems, think abstractly, comprehend complex ideas, learn quickly, and learn from experience. Although not perfect, intelligence is represented by Intelligent Quotient (IQ) scores obtained from standardized tests given by a trained professional. In regard to the intellectual criterion for the diagnosis of mental retardation, mental retardation is generally thought to be present if an individual has an IQ test score of approximately 70 or below. An obtained IQ score must always be considered in light of its standard error of measurement, appropriateness, and consistency with administration guidelines. Since the standard error of measurement for most IQ tests is approximately 5, the ceiling may go up to 75. This represents a score approximately 2 standard deviations below the mean, considering the standard error of measurement. It is important to remember, however, that an IQ score is only one aspect in determining if a person has mental retardation. Significant limitations in adaptive behavior skills and evidence that the disability was present before age 18 are two additional elements that are critical in determining if a person has mental retardation.

    What is Adaptive Behavior?
    Adaptive behavior is the collection of conceptual, social, and practical skills that people have learned so they can function in their everyday lives. Significant limitations in adaptive behavior impact a person's daily life and affect the ability to respond to a particular situation or to the environment.

    Limitations in adaptive behavior can be determined by using standardized tests that are normed on the general population including people with disabilities and people without disabilities. On these standardized measures, significant limitations in adaptive behavior are operationally defined as performance that is at least 2 standard deviations below the mean of either (a) one of the following three types of adaptive behavior: conceptual, social, or practical, or (b) an overall score on a standardized measure of conceptual, social, and practical skills.

    What are some specific examples of Adaptive Behavior Skills?
    Conceptual Skills
    Receptive and expressive language
    Reading and writing
    Money concepts
    Self-directions

    Social Skills
    Interpersonal
    Responsibility
    Self-esteem
    Gullibility (likelihood of being tricked or manipulated)
    Naivete
    Follows rules
    Obeys laws
    Avoids victimization

    Practical Skills
    Personal activities of daily living such as eating, dressing, mobility and toileting. Instrumental activities of daily living such as preparing meals, taking medication, using the telephone, managing money, using transportation and doing housekeeping activities.
    Occupational skills
    Maintaining a safe environment
    Relationships have normal ebbs and flows. They do not automatically get better and better when the participants learn more and more about each other. Instead, the participants have to work through the tensions of the relationship (the dialectic) while they learn and group themselves and a parties in a relationships. At times the relationships is very open and sharing. Other time, one or both parties to the relationship need their space, or have other concerns, and the relationship is less open. The theory posits that these cycles occur throughout the life of the relationship as the persons try to balance their needs for privacy and open relationship.
    Interpersonal Communication Theories and Concepts
    Social Penetration Theory 1
    Social Penetration Theory 2
    Social Penetration Theory 3

  6. #6
    Senior Member ptgatsby's Avatar
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    Not to split hairs, but in terms of IQ, sensors are grouped in the average category (91-109), while intuitives are grouped higher.

    Unlike what is assumed, however, it is generally believed that those with lower IQ develop their sensing skills as a way to compensate. IOW, personality doesn't define IQ. (KAIT)

    It is also a subset of openness and little to do with the imagination/creative aspects of N/Openness (if memory serves me correctly). So there is a rather large correlation between abstract sub-traits and gF (I think), while gC seems to just be hanging about equally (although still gapped, with a preference for openness type traits - the willingness to learn and grow).

    The reason why this doesn't manifest itself universally is because there is a huge overlap despite the binomial distribution of S/N, and simply because Ss don't do any worse in the workplace, statistically speaking. Just like the N side, the STJs cannibalise the SFs and the STPs (NTJs doing the same to the other side) to become vastly over represented. If you normally distribute the factors, the correlation is about 0.3, I think, which isn't very significant. Course, when you segment the population into a 25/33-75/66 split, you are going to get a wider gap.

    What is normally misunderstood is that while Ns are unique good at taking IQ tests, this is because all of the gF loaded tests require abstract thinking. By definition, N's will be better at it. What it doesn't note is that there are very few to no success factors involved. Not money, not happiness... There is a correlation between IQ and wealth and a few others, but for the most part, very little.

    *shrug*

    The problems start when someone starts using these averages as something meaningful. Saying N's are smarter is like saying blacks commit more crimes. Statistically true (in some locations), but irrelevent except for research purposes. It is done to find information, to find causes and to find correlations. Applying it to individuals or groups isn't any better than building upon the same model as racism.

    Quote Originally Posted by raincrow007 View Post
    I really hope pt jumps into this thread.
    As you wish.

  7. #7
    Senior Member raincrow007's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by toonia View Post
    Another thread suggested the usefulness of starting this one.

    What are some areas of intelligence ideally suited to Sensing functions?

    Mechanical intelligence is an obvious one, but i was also wondering if having a photographic memory could be an example of Sensory genius? There is also a kind of kinesthetic intelligence seen in athletes: that is, having immediacy in interacting with ones body, having an (dare I say it...) intuitive feel for how the body is capable of acting. There is also an aspect of artisan intelligence: that is, knowing how to combine elements of the concrete world to create sensory pleasure as in cutlery, sound, visual objects, dance, etc.

    The aspects of Sensory intelligence as I understand them are:

    1. Ability to trouble shoot, solve problems, and create using concrete elements in the external world.

    2. The ability to remember and amass a great many details.

    3. The ability to distill information and an activity down to those elements most practical and of immediate use.

    What say ye?
    I don't think eidetic memory is strictly a Sensorish area of expertise, and I have no trouble doing all three of the things you've listed.

    I think Randomnity is onto something with the fact that the divide is probably more evident in the ways that sensors and intuitives go about doing these things.

  8. #8
    にゃん runvardh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raincrow007 View Post
    I don't think eidetic memory is strictly a Sensorish area of expertise, and I have no trouble doing all three of the things you've listed.

    I think Randomnity is onto something with the fact that the divide is probably more evident in the ways that sensors and intuitives go about doing these things.
    This I can easily agree with, both me and my brother have a fairly decent computer aptitude and are about equal. I'm INFP, he's ISFP.
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  9. #9
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    I had this saved, someone find the correct link:

    Other personality traits being the same, an iNtuitive person (one who grasps patterns and seeks possibilities) is 27 times more likely to have a high IQ than a Sensing person (one who focuses on sensory details and the here-and-now).

  10. #10
    Protocol Droid Athenian200's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by toonia View Post
    The aspects of Sensory intelligence as I understand them are:

    1. Ability to troubleshoot, solve problems, and create using concrete elements in the external world.
    It does seem easier for them, but really only for SP's. SJ's really seem to need prior experience and standards to go by when dealing with something.

    2. The ability to remember and amass a great many details.
    This would probably only apply to SJ's. I think SP's are best at focusing on the moment, and aren't as good at holding onto memories in detail.

    3. The ability to distill information and an activity down to those elements most practical and of immediate use.
    This one might apply to both types of S. But they both do this in different ways. The SJ will see information, and apply it in practical terms towards a Feeling/Thinking goal. The SP will see information, and simply use it as a way to deal with what they are experiencing at the moment, possibly to fix something. Both can use it in practical and immediate ways.
    What say ye?
    These things are proof that Sensors have strengths as well as weaknesses. I always believed this, but just found it frustrating that they can't see things my way, because it makes it so hard to relate to them. I'm sure the feeling was mutual, however. The worst thing about sensors is that I have trouble relating to their perspective, and vice-versa. Other than that, they're basically decent people for the most part.

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