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  1. #141
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
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    I'm sure there's plenty of intelligent conversation there. The narcissistic stuff I'm laughing at is not intelligent though. For example, I was looking up something about INTJs and ran into this little gem. It's in a thread asking what kind of fiction INTJs enjoy.

    I like characters like myself. Mainly, characters who walk about alone, but they have so much behind they're background that no one knows about. They go on their daily lives by their own agenda and appear to be nothing out of the ordinary, but when you discover more about them, you know they are nothing like anyone else, they have supreme power and capabilites.


    For instance, Light Yagami from Death Note




    This guy actually thinks he's a supreme being, "just like that guy from Death Note". He actually goes through life looking at the rest of the world like that. I wouldn't really call it elite. If anything, I'm kind of embarrassed just for reading it.

    Anyways, not to pick on INTJs. Most of the ones here would find it funny too, I think. So it's all good. I'm just illustrating how stupid elitism looks when it actually shows it's face. Definitely not the bane of my existence.

  2. #142
    not to be trusted miss fortune's Avatar
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    OMG... I blushed FOR him... I don't understand that type of delusional superiority really

    and how many super heroes have been sensors? (a lot)
    “Oh, we're always alright. You remember that. We happen to other people.” -Terry Pratchett

  3. #143
    Freaking Ratchet Rail Tracer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marmalade.sunrise View Post
    I'm not intimidated, I'm just annoyed with their asshattery. I'm more bored, amused, or combative than intimidated. A lot of it is eye-rollingly pathetically funny. As others have pointed out, some of them probably aren't even INTJs. But I've noticed that this sort of thing went on at infp global chatter too. There's something amiss about these homogenous forums where most members are one type. It's just not for me. Going to other forums really made me appreciate Type C, for all of it's own little quirks.

    So now I can bring this back on topic by saying that part of my annoyance with intjforum or infpglobal chatter is that differences can be good, and I also agree that compatibility can have more to do with maturity, tolerance of differences, willingness to learn from one another, and shared interests than S or N. It really all comes down to the individual.
    INFPgc, good times... good times. To put it bluntly... that forum was too negative. That is really all I can remember about that forum besides a few names I'm starting to remember. (I sort of remember your name!)

  4. #144
    Senior Member Vamp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by whatever View Post
    and this thread reminded me a bit... what kind of annoys me is that there ARE plenty of people online who bitch about stupid, inflexible sensors "who don't understand my unique and special self " without even BOTHERING to understand sensors in the least... Some of us are on here because we don't fully fit in in the real world either- you're not special just because you "aren't understood and don't fit in"- you're human!

    The crap that people post about sensors at times, and how they never feel accepted because of them, is pretty rediculous. I stand out like a sore thumb in every day life and I'm PROUD to be a sensor... and you know what else is strange? I don't consider anything that any iNtuitive here types to be crazy bizarre and incomprehensible- I get along well with intuitives in real life and shockingly they don't consider me to be stupid or shallow just because I'm different
    It'd be better if we all went "I wish I were a sensor" . That's the kind of sentiment that never gets a butthurt or negative response from anyone. Why is that?

    If people feel like the rest of the world doesn't want them because they aren't like them, that's how they feel. It's not really up to any of us to tell someone not to feel like that because we consider it discriminatory.
    George Bernard Shaw in cartoon form.

  5. #145
    insert random title here Randomnity's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vamp View Post
    It'd be better if we all went "I wish I were a sensor" . That's the kind of sentiment that never gets a butthurt or negative response from anyone. Why is that?

    If people feel like the rest of the world doesn't want them because they aren't like them, that's how they feel. It's not really up to any of us to tell someone not to feel like that because we consider it discriminatory.
    Way to miss the point. She's talking about people who put down sensors because they feel like they're a unique snowflake who just doesn't fit in with everyone else in the real world (which automatically means sensors) so it's ok to put sensors down here...even though we don't automatically feel like we belong in society just because we're sensors either (and we certainly don't automatically shun people because they're N, either).

    There's a lot more to "fitting in" than S vs. N....I would have had a much more pleasant childhood and adolescence if being a sensor gave me a "fit in with your peers" free pass, that's for sure.
    -end of thread-

  6. #146
    resonance entropie's Avatar
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    I agree with the idea of the "Sensor sentiment" being a scapegoat for many people for all that is evil. I personally do not think so because I havent had this train of thought at all.

    See, I think mbti has severe limitations and it's necessary that one does move within those limitations when discussing mbti. I for example think that a Sensor is better for becoming a jet pilot, while an Intuitive is better for sciene labor at University. This I do because of the concrete description of the functions Sensing and Intuiting.

    But this is where the theory ends. If one does know say that a Sensor could also be good at science work, I think you have overstrained the limits of mbti theory. Mbti theory is simple as that, 2 train of thoughts, 2 different ideas on how to see the world, 2 preferences. And thats it.

    Who you are, what you do with ur life and what really makes you a person, mbti may explain to an extent of 5 %. All that follows beyond, should by all means not be explained by mbti. Cause if someone cares for individuality and has understood that infact everyone is different from each other, mbti will never suffice to answer the whole question.
    [URL]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tEBvftJUwDw&t=0s[/URL]

  7. #147
    Member Caesar's Avatar
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    Haha. Funny. I've had this fellow INTJ call me a "grade whore" just because I give a shit about my grades and playing to the academic system we have in place. I might be less N than she is. Whatever.

    I have to admit, I was pretty hostile towards ISFJs for a while. But then I realized it was just hostility towards my ISFJ mom, who really made me feel like crap for my gender identity and nonconformity. One of my good friends is ISFJ, and she's nothing like my mom. But it doesn't help that my mom comes from a traditional, Confucian society, where I have to cower to my elders and respect them just cus. I like some sensors, and severely dislike others. But that's like that with any type. I like some Ns, severely dislike others. My ENFP friend is the wisest kid on the block, but the other ENFP who's in the same clique is pretty immature and controversial; likes to fan up conflict. People are just people. Type doesn't matter that much.
    "Most people are other people. Their thoughts are someone else's opinions, their lives a mimicry, their passions a quotation." - Oscar Wilde

  8. #148
    not to be trusted miss fortune's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Randomnity View Post
    Way to miss the point. She's talking about people who put down sensors because they feel like they're a unique snowflake who just doesn't fit in with everyone else in the real world (which automatically means sensors) so it's ok to put sensors down here...even though we don't automatically feel like we belong in society just because we're sensors either (and we certainly don't automatically shun people because they're N, either).

    There's a lot more to "fitting in" than S vs. N....I would have had a much more pleasant childhood and adolescence if being a sensor gave me a "fit in with your peers" free pass, that's for sure.
    Yes! You get it!!!

    It annoys me to hear people bitching about how iNtuitive people don't fit in because they're Ns in an S world when I fit in just as well as they do because I'm an odd duck Sensor... getting the blame for everyone else's misery because of my type and THEN on top of that not really being a perfect fit to society myself sucks... I thought that Ns like to pride themselves for seeing a bigger picture for goodness sake :rolli:

    /bitter
    “Oh, we're always alright. You remember that. We happen to other people.” -Terry Pratchett

  9. #149
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
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    There are passages in Thomson's book that touches on SP angst or alienation a bit. They're not immune to seeing themselves as outsiders.

    From the ISTP section: Extreme ISTPs, who rely on Introverted Thinking, may attempt to avoid any situation that will require them to do something that doesn't come naturally to them. And they may be quite angry about the ways in which others are trying to control them and make them fit into a particular social niche. [..] When they use Introverted Intuition defensively, these types identify very strongly with ideas that call the present structures of society into question. They attract to themselves not only the disenfranchised and the iconoclast but the psychotic and the troubled, without being able to offer anything beyond the common experience of feeling disrespected.

    And ISFP issues are bundled a lot with INFPs.

    Like Introverted Thinkers, IFPs need to develop their Extraverted Skills well enough to invest themselves in life as it really is. Otherwise, they spend too much time protecting themselves from situations uncongenial to their inner realm, and their least developed function, Extraverted Thinking, gets out of their control.

    What's difficult for these types is the approach to life Extraverted Thinking fosters. To understand reality by way of general principles strikes IFPs as cold and dehumanizing. It reduces people to categories, robs them of their self-experience.

    [..] ISFPs, whose tertiary function is Introverted Intuition, are more likely to pursue an alternate lifestyle, attempting to embody their social critique. Sometimes INFPs do this too, but they don't anticipate the conflict this will generate in their lives. [..] The images these ISFPs construct has quite a bit of resonance in the pop ethos, and such types can acquire what may be called a tragic sense of cool.


    And so and so forth. I don't want to quote the whole book. A common theme in her book though is the conflict that Fi doms and Ti doms experience with Fe and Te. Ni doms somewhat too, but in a different. All of them are potential rebels and outcasts.

  10. #150
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
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    There are passages in Thomson's book that touches on SP angst or alienation a bit. They're not immune to seeing themselves as outsiders.

    From the ISTP section: Extreme ISTPs, who rely on Introverted Thinking, may attempt to avoid any situation that will require them to do something that doesn't come naturally to them. And they may be quite angry about the ways in which others are trying to control them and make them fit into a particular social niche. [..] When they use Introverted Intuition defensively, these types identify very strongly with ideas that call the present structures of society into question. They attract to themselves not only the disenfranchised and the iconoclast but the psychotic and the troubled, without being able to offer anything beyond the common experience of feeling disrespected.

    And ISFP issues are bundled a lot with INFPs.

    Like Introverted Thinkers, IFPs need to develop their Extraverted Skills well enough to invest themselves in life as it really is. Otherwise, they spend too much time protecting themselves from situations uncongenial to their inner realm, and their least developed function, Extraverted Thinking, gets out of their control.

    What's difficult for these types is the approach to life Extraverted Thinking fosters. To understand reality by way of general principles strikes IFPs as cold and dehumanizing. It reduces people to categories, robs them of their self-experience.

    [..] ISFPs, whose tertiary function is Introverted Intuition, are more likely to pursue an alternate lifestyle, attempting to embody their social critique. Sometimes INFPs do this too, but they don't anticipate the conflict this will generate in their lives. [..] The images these ISFPs construct has quite a bit of resonance in the pop ethos, and such types can acquire what may be called a tragic sense of cool.


    And so on and so forth. I don't want to quote the whole book. A common theme in her book though is the conflict that Fi doms and Ti doms experience with Fe and Te. Ni doms somewhat too, but in a different way. All of them are potential misfits though

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