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Thread: SJs and Theory

  1. #1
    Carerra Lu IZthe411's Avatar
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    Default SJs and Theory

    I learn better by theory. I don't understand why this is considered an N trait.
    I prefer to start at the top and then work my way downward (Big picture and drill down). Another trait typed at N.

    How many of you S types prefer theory over just learning how to do XYZ?

  2. #2
    No moss growing on me Giggly's Avatar
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    For me it depends on what I am learning.

    I really can't pinpoint a pattern but I definitely will be disinterested in the theory part of some things I learn. My eyes glaze over in boredom until I get to the practical parts, but with other things like with learning a new language, I need the theory part first or else I can not proceed with learning.

    Sometimes it's just a directional thing - theory first, practical to follow, or vice versa, which means they are not always mutually exclusive like MBTI sometimes suggests a difference between Sensors and Intuitives.

    I guess if I had to pick one or the other, I'd pick practical hands-on learning.

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    Head Pigeon Mad Hatter's Avatar
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    This is a wild guess, but I assume quite a lot of theory is the result of a very diligent Si at work.
    Being an INTP, I'm fairly quick to point out error in detail because I think that every detail is relevant to the big picture and you can't just skip them as you like.
    IN SERIO FATVITAS.

    -τὸ γὰρ γράμμα ἀποκτέννει, τὸ δὲ πνεῦμα ζῳοποιεῖ-

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    No moss growing on me Giggly's Avatar
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    ^ yeah exactly.

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    Carerra Lu IZthe411's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Giggly View Post
    For me it depends on what I am learning.

    I really can't pinpoint a pattern but I definitely will be disinterested in the theory part of some things I learn. My eyes glaze over in boredom until I get to the practical parts, but with other things like with learning a new language, I need the theory part first or else I can not proceed with learning.

    Sometimes it's just a directional thing - theory first, practical to follow, or vice versa, which means they are not always mutually exclusive like MBTI sometimes suggests a difference between Sensors and Intuitives.

    I guess if I had to pick one or the other, I'd pick practical hands-on learning.
    I think if the theory is too vague, examples upfront are better. Take audit. That's all theory- principles. You can demonstrate an audit, but no one audit will ever be the same.

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    Carerra Lu IZthe411's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mad Hatter View Post
    This is a wild guess, but I assume quite a lot of theory is the result of a very diligent Si at work.
    Being an INTP, I'm fairly quick to point out error in detail because I think that every detail is relevant to the big picture and you can't just skip them as you like.
    So is theory a more Ne/Si thing or Ni/Se?

    I can see elements of Si, Ne and Ni in a good theory.

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    Honor Thy Inferior Such Irony's Avatar
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    For me it varies. For some things, if I don't have a sense of the larger picture, the why behind things, I can't really learn it. With other things, I just want to get on with it and don't really care about the underlying theory behind it. I'm more likely to appreciate the theory behind something that I'm actually interested in.
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    Senior Member Habba's Avatar
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    I'm always interested in how things work. I never liked learning by memorizing steps, I prefer understanding them.

    I hate learning on pure theory (e.g. math), I always need a point of reference on what I'm learning. Also, without an useful goal, learning has little motivation for me in itself. Studying math at university has been a huge challenge for me for many reasons, one of them being that it doesn't seem to be applicable to anything I do in life. They thought me how to derivate and integrate, but they didn't tell me how to make money with that knowledge. Learning how to use something to make money is the top priority in this world.

    Also, I learn very much by doing things myself, or studying others' work. I'm always interested in reason why something was done in the way it's done. I think I also have a very keen sense of finding ways to improve something, as I seem to be able to find faults on everything. Of course, I do a lot of comparison based on my previous experiences with similar or even remotely similar things.

    It helps me a lot when I can recognize a familiar pattern. "Hey, this thing works here the same way as A works in B."

    I think these are clear signs of Si and Te at work.

    I only support theories if they support my personal experiences.
    "The present is theirs; the future, for which I have really worked, is mine."
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    Junior Member apotheosis29's Avatar
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    I like to start out with the big picture view and from there move into the details of step by step. I want to see someone else's previously attempted steps and view how successful/unsuccessful they are so that I can make improvements upon their previously made attempts.

    @Habba...I totally understand what you're saying with the mathematics studies, show me how they are going to be relevant in my daily life, what jobs would I use them in? It's much different when you have to take an intro business course, you can easily relate how the concepts are going to translate to the real world. Even when I had to take group communication studies (which I so wanted to avoid because they have two words I hate right in the title) it's pretty easy to see how those relate as well.

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    Senior Member Xyk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Habba View Post
    I'm always interested in how things work. I never liked learning by memorizing steps, I prefer understanding them.

    I hate learning on pure theory (e.g. math), I always need a point of reference on what I'm learning. Also, without an useful goal, learning has little motivation for me in itself. Studying math at university has been a huge challenge for me for many reasons, one of them being that it doesn't seem to be applicable to anything I do in life. They thought me how to derivate and integrate, but they didn't tell me how to make money with that knowledge. Learning how to use something to make money is the top priority in this world.
    I find that most higher math teachers don't really understand why they teach math, and therefore can't effectively motivate their students. The purpose of math education is not usually for any direct practical reason, but to expand and develop the logical side of the brain. Learning how to do calculus will indirectly help you to solve practical problems. They might not teach you how to directly make money with the knowledge of calculus (because besides engineering, there isn't very much money coming directly from calculus) but knowledge of it will help you to work out complex problems in other regions of your life. Higher math teaches the ability to look at situations from several angles simultaneously and pick the best way to overcome obstacles. Critical thinking is important and is strengthened when practicing higher math skills.

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