User Tag List

First 123 Last

Results 11 to 20 of 21

  1. #11
    Was E.laur Laurie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    MBTI
    ENFP
    Enneagram
    7w6
    Socionics
    ENFp
    Posts
    6,075

    Default

    This works until you have children. My sister's daughter would cry as a young baby if she was around loud people for too long of a time, and would be happy when I put her in the other room in her car seat. She needed that down time.

    My SP started walking furniture at 6 months and walking at 8 (most kids are around 11 - 13 months) No one would ever confuse her with an SJ.

    My IJ has been obviously IJ her whole life. When she was 10 months old she was so frustrated she couldn't walk but wouldn't start until she could walk perfectly. She told me as a 10 year old that she wished there wasn't phone or email because she talked too much at school already.

    My little EP has always loved people and been energized by being with and around people.

  2. #12
    Senior Member forzen's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Socionics
    X/0
    Posts
    547

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Elaur View Post
    This works until you have children. My sister's daughter would cry as a young baby if she was around loud people for too long of a time, and would be happy when I put her in the other room in her car seat. She needed that down time.

    My SP started walking furniture at 6 months and walking at 8 (most kids are around 11 - 13 months) No one would ever confuse her with an SJ.

    My IJ has been obviously IJ her whole life. When she was 10 months old she was so frustrated she couldn't walk but wouldn't start until she could walk perfectly. She told me as a 10 year old that she wished there wasn't phone or email because she talked too much at school already.

    My little EP has always loved people and been energized by being with and around people.
    That's why i said possitive stimulation. Loud people are negative stimulation, therefore does not stimulate the reward system. However, this could reenforce the behavior of introvercy, because the assumption that she likes to be alone can make the parent leave her be more often versus a child stimulated by loud noises. This could lead the child into becoming an INFP or an INTP. Assumptions are fun .
    This post grammatical errors had been intentionally left uncorrected.

  3. #13
    Was E.laur Laurie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    MBTI
    ENFP
    Enneagram
    7w6
    Socionics
    ENFp
    Posts
    6,075

    Default

    Some children like loud people so that would be a reward for them.

  4. #14
    Senior Member forzen's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Socionics
    X/0
    Posts
    547

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Elaur View Post
    Some children like loud people so that would be a reward for them.
    True, but the child your describing perceives it negatively. Hence, within the context of my post, it's consider negative stimulation .
    This post grammatical errors had been intentionally left uncorrected.

  5. #15
    Senior Member FallaciaSonata's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    MBTI
    ISTJ
    Enneagram
    1w9
    Socionics
    ISTj
    Posts
    159

    Default

    I've consulted with my parents and my grandmother frequently about my childhood, for many reasons, and if what I've gleaned from them holds true, then I was very well taken care of and always given attention. Oddly enough, they told me that I didn't always *want* their attention, and I was known for being the quiet kid who stayed in his room with his Legos when people came over (and when they weren't).

    This is where I'm split on my introversion....how much of it was innate, genetic, "nature", and how much wasn't? Seeing how both of my parents are on the introverted side of the spectrum, it seems to follow logic that I would become that way because I idolized (still idolize) both of them.

    I was studying some of Bandura's social cognitive theory and how we learn by mimicking others, and also some of Freud's opinion on how we "reconcile" with our same-sex parent (Oedipus complex issue, won't go into that, sort of goofy) (mostly just getting at the mimicry thing) and I tend to believe that....whatever you're exposed to as a kid, it becomes your "reference standard".

    I apply this reference standard to many things.....I think it's why when I find a girl attractive, I look at specific features and compare them to mine and my mother's --- they usually turn out similar. (I'm talking nitty-gritty here, like fingernail shape/size, hair color and level of straight/curly, shape of nose, mostly natural features.)

    Anyway, I went off on a little tangent there. Returning to my original thought, I think it's possible that I am introverted because my parents are, and my introversion is partially learned. Example: Seeing Mom spend a lot of time reading or working on something made me "think" as a child that doing those things was "the norm". (The reference standard, if you will.) Also, my tendency to please my parents could have also played a small role here, too, seeing how I hated disappointing them.



    On another similar, related note, I compare myself to my sister at times. She is still on the introverted side of the spectrum, *perhaps* (still working on that) but she is *significantly* more.....sociable than me. People commonly mistake me as being shy, but the truth is I have no interest in speaking with them. I bring this up because my sister and I are only one year and three months apart and we were both raised in the same house, with the same parents, same....everything. Yet she's wildly different from me --- so I conclude that her personality must be mostly genetic --- as is mine.

    Thoughts?

    Always remember to flank your enemies. History won't remember how dramatic your failed frontal assault looked. - Dragon Age: Origins

  6. #16
    Senior Member forzen's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Socionics
    X/0
    Posts
    547

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FallaciaSonata View Post
    I've consulted with my parents and my grandmother frequently about my childhood, for many reasons, and if what I've gleaned from them holds true, then I was very well taken care of and always given attention. Oddly enough, they told me that I didn't always *want* their attention, and I was known for being the quiet kid who stayed in his room with his Legos when people came over (and when they weren't).

    This is where I'm split on my introversion....how much of it was innate, genetic, "nature", and how much wasn't? Seeing how both of my parents are on the introverted side of the spectrum, it seems to follow logic that I would become that way because I idolized (still idolize) both of them.

    I was studying some of Bandura's social cognitive theory and how we learn by mimicking others, and also some of Freud's opinion on how we "reconcile" with our same-sex parent (Oedipus complex issue, won't go into that, sort of goofy) (mostly just getting at the mimicry thing) and I tend to believe that....whatever you're exposed to as a kid, it becomes your "reference standard".

    I apply this reference standard to many things.....I think it's why when I find a girl attractive, I look at specific features and compare them to mine and my mother's --- they usually turn out similar. (I'm talking nitty-gritty here, like fingernail shape/size, hair color and level of straight/curly, shape of nose, mostly natural features.)

    Anyway, I went off on a little tangent there. Returning to my original thought, I think it's possible that I am introverted because my parents are, and my introversion is partially learned. Example: Seeing Mom spend a lot of time reading or working on something made me "think" as a child that doing those things was "the norm". (The reference standard, if you will.) Also, my tendency to please my parents could have also played a small role here, too, seeing how I hated disappointing them.



    On another similar, related note, I compare myself to my sister at times. She is still on the introverted side of the spectrum, *perhaps* (still working on that) but she is *significantly* more.....sociable than me. People commonly mistake me as being shy, but the truth is I have no interest in speaking with them. I bring this up because my sister and I are only one year and three months apart and we were both raised in the same house, with the same parents, same....everything. Yet she's wildly different from me --- so I conclude that her personality must be mostly genetic --- as is mine.

    Thoughts?
    Mimicking would not really describe the behavior since if that was the case, every christian parents would have christian kids. Yet, many people have different ideologies from their parents. Although i do agree in why your attraction is similar to your parents. But i'm basing it more on the fact that comfort of familiarity is based on the human species survivility in the past. Gambling on the unknown is very hard since it's safer to take the familiar route. The girl you have a crush on have familiar features, so you unconciously assume that she's healthy because your mom is healthy and therefore worthy to procreate with, but it doesn't stop with your parent and perhaps extend to anyone that influenced you positively. Also, in the past, human is likely to be in the alert mode when in a foreign environment (due to a more hostile environment) and when in the alert mode human tend to feel uncomfortable. So being in a familiar setting, as well as seeing familiar people gives people comfort and are free to let their guard down.
    Last edited by forzen; 11-25-2009 at 01:03 AM.
    This post grammatical errors had been intentionally left uncorrected.

  7. #17
    That chalkboard guy Matthew_Z's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    MBTI
    xxxx
    Posts
    1,256

    Default

    There certainly is evidence to suggest that N/S, perhaps even correlated with J/P, is at least partially nurture related. I've observed (note, anecdote, not a statistic) that many NJs, perhaps most, have described themselves as "being raised by the television," IN_Js moreso than EN_Js. Of course, It could be that the NJness caused the TV proximity, not the other way around. The statistical investigation is for another day.

    Assuming that N/S is largely nurture, not nature, we can reasonably conclude that this preference likely is created in the first three years of life. (based on present knowledge of infant brain development and neurology in general) How? Theoretically, brain matter could be open any form of functioning initially and later make connections later on. General patterns of these connections create the functions as we know them. For whatever reason, the infant brain may favor some connections. This can be in part due to the chemical composition of the brain, in large part from the genetic makeup of the individual. However, as has been observed in the study of identical twins, any given DNA makeup does not guarantee type. Given that, from an evolutionary standpoint, the ability to adapt and specialize in one's environment is preferred, how one perceives the world relates to the world that is being perceived. Ergo, the perception is not innate.
    If a deaf INFP falls in the forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?

  8. #18
    Senior Member FallaciaSonata's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    MBTI
    ISTJ
    Enneagram
    1w9
    Socionics
    ISTj
    Posts
    159

    Default

    Interesting. I'm half-tempted to have children of my own so I can study them.

    You mentioned that the infant brain may favor some connections. Just curious, but what do you think about Piaget's theory on cognitive development? It seemed, when applied to type, that all children would be S types. (Assimilation, perhaps?) But then again, when my teacher explained Accommodation in detail, that screamed "Ne" to me for some reason.

    Another thought, slightly unrelated. Do you think children with slightly-overactive amygdala (fearful temperament?) favor being S types? It seems logical to me that if you're overly alert you pay more attention to immediate surroundings than imagination, but then again, I could be totally off-key here.

    I say this because as a child I think I would have had a fearful, or at the very least, inhibited temperament. I imagine this would just be shyness coupled with introversion --- as I grew older, I "outgrew" the shyness and now I'm just introverted. (Not afraid to talk to people at all, just don't want to.)

    Just some fluff for thought.

    Always remember to flank your enemies. History won't remember how dramatic your failed frontal assault looked. - Dragon Age: Origins

  9. #19
    Senior Member incubustribute's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    MBTI
    ISFJ
    Posts
    297

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FallaciaSonata View Post
    However, I am told I would (on an every day basis) play alone in my bedroom for hours on end, building something or working on something (I was a lego maniac).

    *runs up to room to relive his childhood*

  10. #20
    That chalkboard guy Matthew_Z's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    MBTI
    xxxx
    Posts
    1,256

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FallaciaSonata View Post
    Interesting. I'm half-tempted to have children of my own so I can study them.

    You mentioned that the infant brain may favor some connections. Just curious, but what do you think about Piaget's theory on cognitive development? It seemed, when applied to type, that all children would be S types. (Assimilation, perhaps?) But then again, when my teacher explained Accommodation in detail, that screamed "Ne" to me for some reason.

    Another thought, slightly unrelated. Do you think children with slightly-overactive amygdala (fearful temperament?) favor being S types? It seems logical to me that if you're overly alert you pay more attention to immediate surroundings than imagination, but then again, I could be totally off-key here.

    I say this because as a child I think I would have had a fearful, or at the very least, inhibited temperament. I imagine this would just be shyness coupled with introversion --- as I grew older, I "outgrew" the shyness and now I'm just introverted. (Not afraid to talk to people at all, just don't want to.)

    Just some fluff for thought.
    My particular interest is in the area of the interaction between behavior and personality, especially pertaining to cause and effect. Does behavior lead to personality? Does personality lead to behavior? More likely to not, the effect works both as both slowly solidify at a complementary pace.

    To be honest, I must confess that I am not too familiar with Piaget's theory.

    As for perception, I think it is more important to differentiate J perception from P perception than it is to differentiate S perception from N perception. As some have suggested, a J/P preference emerges before an S/N preference. Both extraverted perceiving functions desire to explore what is unknown or not fully known. Both introverted perceiving functions tend to explore what is already known. Se can be thought of as exploring the physical world, while Ne envisions what could be explored and how these could interact, with a slightly smaller emphasis on the physical realm. In a similar manner, Si thrives on "reliving" past experiences as raw as they initially were. Similarly to how Ne is to Se, Ni seeks to explore different interpretations of the original data, to know more of it and fill in the blanks.

    In this sense, one could infer that P perception arises from input that suggests to the brain that it should adapt to constant exploring, while J perception arises from the input that what has been observed is sufficient and merely needs to be processed. N/S perception is determined later on the basis of what "side" of data perceived is significant. SJs and NJs could be raised in an environment of relative stability, while SJs adapt to more physical relationships and connections, such as those that would come from a strong parental attachment. NJs could adapt from knowing their constancy but still require their picture completed, possibly coming from how the nature of interactions between experiences was first introduced to them.
    If a deaf INFP falls in the forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?

Similar Threads

  1. Nature vs nurture temperaments
    By UnitOfPopulation in forum Other Personality Systems
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 03-25-2015, 03:39 AM
  2. Video: Personality-Type Development: Nature vs. Nurture
    By highlander in forum Typology Videos and RSS Feeds
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-28-2014, 08:13 PM
  3. Nature Vs. ThatGirl
    By ThatGirl in forum Home, Garden and Nature
    Replies: 50
    Last Post: 06-29-2010, 01:47 PM
  4. Nature,... Or nurture?
    By Prototype in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-05-2009, 12:31 PM
  5. Nature vs Nurture - Political philosphy...
    By Xander in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 12-22-2008, 06:27 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO