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  1. #11
    Senior Member Lambchop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by saslou View Post
    Mum - ESFx
    Dad - INTx
    Me - ESFJ
    Bro - ESTP
    Step Sis - ExTP (don't think N)



    This was talked about on another thread about nature Vs nurture.

    It's a hard one.

    Both my boys are T's and i love it. At least there is no drama (well not much, lol)

    When younger, i could read to them, play with their toys, colour together, bake .. do all the usual things you do with the kiddies.

    Now they are a little older, things are just slightly different. They usually resolve around the computer or school.

    My ENTP likes to show me sites he has found online that he thinks are hilarious and sometimes they are, other times he will discuss topics that go right over my head and i have to find the info online (great though as it keeps my mind active) and my older son ISTJ, he is into cooking and is probably a better cook than me, so we work together and bake things.
    What i find really nice with my boys being 14 and 12, is that they will come and lie with me on my bed and we'll just chat .. about anything and everything.

    So far so good.
    Interesting Saslou! I could sometimes do with LESS drama with my boys and I never considered that angle!

    Mine come in and chat with me about stuff too...they are 14 and 18, but they always have. I LOVE that too.

  2. #12
    Senior Member NewEra's Avatar
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    Good topic. For me:

    Dad: ENTJ
    Mom: INFJ
    Sister (older): ISFJ
    Me: ISTJ

    I would say the way my parents shaped me most is making me a J. For that, I must thank them. The I, S, and T were not really affected by them, I pretty much developed those myself. In my opinion, J/P is the most susceptible to environmental changes, at least that's the case for me.

  3. #13
    No moss growing on me Giggly's Avatar
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    Dad: ISTx
    Mom: ESFJ
    Sister: ESFJ
    Brother: ISTP
    Sister: ESFP
    Me: ISFJ

    You can understand why I'm an iNtuitard now.

    I definitely think parents influence their children's type, but it's not always in a way that makes the children more like their parents, sometimes it's in a way that makes their children less like them.
    Last edited by Giggly; 09-19-2009 at 11:18 PM.

  4. #14
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lambchop View Post
    How much of our personality type is tied to our parents' personality type, do you think? Do you think there is a genetic component to personality type?
    I think statistically there is no evidence of a connection.

    There are some hard traits (like introversion being attached to neural sensitivity) which seems potentially more genetic in nature, but there are SO many variables that contribute to behavior that it's hard to say that type can be directly derived from the parental unit(s).

    I think if it was more common, parents and kids would understand each other better. I keep seeing all the damage that occurs because a parent assumes that the child should respond and think like they do, and don't understand that they aren't the same personality.

    I DO think that parents who are respectful of their kids and use their giftings wisely can help round out their children function-wise and develop parts of themselves they would not have otherwise developed. A bad parent can negatively influence a child by either crushing their natural functions OR accentuating them (as a defense mechanism on the part of the kid).

    I was thinking about my kids and how they are both F's (both boys too) and how I can't imagine raising a T child. Especially a rational T child. Because of my type, I snuggled my kids and sang them little songs and made heart shaped cookies with them and they loved it. I still hug them to death. I was adopted and found my biological mom in my 20s (so she didn't raise me), but I would bet a lot of money that she and I had the same personality type.
    I have two F kids and a T kid.

    I deal great with the Ti-primary kid, and I deal decently with the Fe-secondary kid.

    It's the Fi secondary kid that I actually get into the worst scrapes with, ugh. We are more different from each other than I am with either of the other two. it can be hard sometimes to figure out how to approach things in a way that honors him while still challenging him.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  5. #15
    No moss growing on me Giggly's Avatar
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    Jennifer, you sound like a wonderful parent.

  6. #16
    Senior Member Hirsch63's Avatar
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    It seems that we may develop our preferences as a reaction to our parent's type preferences...depending on how well their choices bring us to a feeling of stability and security. and then there is the variable of environment. I do not believe type is genetic though that which you do inherit in terms of physicality can lead to similar type choices by circumstance.
    Patriotism is the last refuge to which a scoundrel clings...Steal a little and they throw you in jail, steal a lot and they make you a king

  7. #17
    Senior Member Saslou's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lambchop View Post
    Interesting Saslou! I could sometimes do with LESS drama with my boys and I never considered that angle!

    Mine come in and chat with me about stuff too...they are 14 and 18, but they always have. I LOVE that too.
    I can provide enough emotion (when times are tough) for all 3 of us. Why on earth would i want more F people around me, lol. My youngest turned round to me today after seeing that i had received another book i ordered on line and after asking what i had brought said to me 'Stop buying that crap'. It was another self help book. I love T's in my life.

    Like Jennifer said though .. There has been some interesting head banging with me and my youngest in the past. We are what we are and i know he is never going to have a clean room or wash unless i drag his butt to the shiny thing called a tap and make him clean himself. lol. It is amazing and i only wish i knew about this MBTI earlier.

    I was under the impression your children were quite young as the picture you showed us of yourself, well ... What's your secret darling???
    “I made you take time to look at what I saw and when you took time to really notice my flower, you hung all your associations with flowers on my flower and you write about my flower as if I think and see what you think and see—and I don't.”
    ― Georgia O'Keeffe

  8. #18
    Senior Member FallaciaSonata's Avatar
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    I've been observing my family and I've this is what I've got so far....

    Me = ISTJ (Frequent use of Ne)
    Mom = ISTJ (Heavier usage of Fi, but Si Te still dominate.)
    Dad = ISTP
    Sister = Not sure yet. Current guesses are on ISFP and ENFJ. See the following thread for details: http://www.typologycentral.com/forum...er-s-type.html

    As far as preference for nature / nuture, I think my Introversion was inherent --- I am without a doubt the most introverted member of our bunch. Not as sure about the S and T traits, but I think the J trait comes from me watching Mom, whom I was around the most growing up. She's a super-J person.

    Interesting articles:




    30 March 1999
    Introverts At The Front, Extroverts To The Rear
    by Kate Melville

    A University of Iowa study adds to growing evidence that being shy or outgoing may be all in your head. Investigators looking at cerebral blood flow and personality found more conclusive signs of different brain activity in introverts and extroverts.

    This is the first study to reveal the connections between activity of the thalamus and introversion and extroversion, said Debra L. Johnson, Ph.D., UI assistant research scientist in psychology and the study's lead investigator. "We found more evidence that people might be shy or outgoing because of the way their brains are structured, not because of experiences they've had."

    Previous studies have shown that introversion and extroversion are based on variations in brain function, but those studies did not describe all the locations found in this study. The UI researchers examined 18 healthy individuals using positron emission tomography (PET) scans, which can provide a high-resolution image of the entire head.

    The PET scans revealed that introverts have more activity in the frontal lobes of the brain and anterior, or front, thalamus. These areas are activated when a person's brain takes on internal processing such as remembering, problem solving and planning. Extroverts exhibit more activity in the anterior cingulate gyrus, temporal lobes and posterior thalamus. These areas are typically thought to be more involved in sensory processing such as listening, watching or driving.

    The differences in cognitive style and sensory-processing relate to the qualities associated with introversion and extroversion. True introverts are quiet, inwardly focused and reclusive. Extroverts are gregarious, socially active and sensation seeking.

    "Introverts get more of their stimulation internally, whereas extroverts seek outside sources," Johnson said. "Extremely introverted and extroverted personalities are two ends of a continuum, with most people falling somewhere in between."

    Johnson added, "The implication is that one personality trait -- introversion or extroversion - isn't right or wrong. These variations in brain activity suggest that a lot of our individual differences have an underlying biological cause."

    The subjects, 10 men and eight women, first took personality tests to determine the extent to which they were introverts or extroverts. The researchers later had the subjects lie down with their eyes closed while the PET scan measured brain activity.

    "Lying quietly allows the mind to be free and do what it naturally does," Johnson explained. "When a part of the brain becomes active, there is increased blood flow to that region, which shows up on the PET scan."

    The findings were published in the February issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry.


    More Stuff:


    The Introverts Strike Back

    The Difference Between Introverts and Extroverts | Psychology Today

    Top 5 Things Every Extrovert Should Know About Introverts

    It turns out that the distinction between introversion and extroversion is all in your head but I mean this quite literally!

    brain activityIntroverted children enjoy the internal world of thoughts, feelings and fantasies, and theres a physiological reason for this. Researchers using brain scans have found introverts have more brain activity in general, and specifically in the frontal lobes. When these areas are activated, introverts are energized by retrieving long-term memories, problem solving, introspection, complex thinking and planning.

    Extroverts enjoy the external world of things, people and activities. They have more activity in brain areas involved in processing the sensory information were bombarded with daily. Because extroverts have less internally generated brain activity, they search for more external stimuli to energize them. [emphasis added]


    The social gene

    The question remains, How do we get to be an introvert or extrovert? While nothing is all in the genes, there appears to be a genetic factor in our socializing preferences. The novelty-seeking or lust for excitement may be linked to a D4DR gene on chromosome 11. Dean Hamer, chief of gene structure and regulation at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Maryland, studied the D4DR gene and found that it affects the neurotransmitter dopamine, which controls excitement levels and is vital for physical activity and motivation.

    Novelty seekers (wheres the bungee-jumping party?) were found to have a long D4DR gene and were less sensitive to dopamine, a chemical mediator for pleasure and emotion in the brain. The low-novelty seekers had short D4DR genes that were highly sensitive to dopamine. Because they receive enough dopamine in quiet activities, they dont need as much buzz in their lives. They feel more discomfort than enjoyment from thrill-seeking or risk-taking. Too much dopamine and they feel over-stimulated.
    Chemistry of walls and flowers

    The introverted brain has a higher level of internal activity and thinking than the extroverted brain. It is dominated by the long, slow pathway of another neurotransmitter called acetylcholine. Introverts require a limited range of not too much or too little dopamine, another brain chemical, and a good level of acetylcholine to keep a calm feeling instituted. Acetylcholine serves as a trigger to the brain to conserve energy and stimulates good thinking and feeling.

    Laney explains that the extroverted brain just doesnt have as much internal activity going on. So, it scans the external world for stimulation to fuel the shorter, quicker dopamine pathway. The signals from the brain travel to the Full-Throttle (sympathetic nervous) system that controls certain body functions and influences how outies behave, she says.

    But, an extrovert needs its sidekick, adrenaline, to help cook up more dopamine in the brain, Laney says. Like plants to sunlight, their energy comes from the places they go; the people they see. Leave an extrovert alone for two minutes and he will be calling someone on his cell phone.

    So, during these merry days, as extroverts chat away, hands and mouths dancing in a choreographed ballet, try to remember the lament of the introverted Rauch, We can only dream that someday, when our condition is more widely understood, when perhaps an Introverts Rights movement has blossomed and borne fruit, it will not be impolite to say, Im an introvert. You are a wonderful person and I like you. But now please, shush.


    Of course, as with most studies, this is mostly speculation. Interesting, but it's not the Bible. Take it with a grain of salt. (Good luck picking a single grain up.)

    Always remember to flank your enemies. History won't remember how dramatic your failed frontal assault looked. - Dragon Age: Origins

  9. #19
    Senior Member Clonester's Avatar
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    None at all. Interesting some of the SJ's I know seem to think there is a connection. However I do believe they can instill qualities in their children that can balance out their personality type.

    For example, my parents are both ISxJ. I'm an ENFP. One probably wouldn't expect an ENFP to pay their bills on time, be on time in general, keep their place clean, spend their money wisely, etc. But these things were drilled into me by my parents so I'm still an ENFP but they've helped me to have a more rounded personality.
    ENFP Male: E-74% N-95% F-58% P-84% 3w2
    "I feel there are two people inside me - me and my intuition. If I go against her, she'll screw me every time, and if I follow her, we get along quite nicely." -Kim Basinger

  10. #20
    Senior Member Lambchop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FallaciaSonata View Post
    I've been observing my family and I've this is what I've got so far....

    Me = ISTJ (Frequent use of Ne)
    Mom = ISTJ (Heavier usage of Fi, but Si Te still dominate.)
    Dad = ISTP
    Sister = Not sure yet. Current guesses are on ISFP and ENFJ. See the following thread for details: http://www.typologycentral.com/forum...er-s-type.html

    As far as preference for nature / nuture, I think my Introversion was inherent --- I am without a doubt the most introverted member of our bunch. Not as sure about the S and T traits, but I think the J trait comes from me watching Mom, whom I was around the most growing up. She's a super-J person.

    Interesting articles:




    30 March 1999
    Introverts At The Front, Extroverts To The Rear
    by Kate Melville

    A University of Iowa study adds to growing evidence that being shy or outgoing may be all in your head. Investigators looking at cerebral blood flow and personality found more conclusive signs of different brain activity in introverts and extroverts.

    This is the first study to reveal the connections between activity of the thalamus and introversion and extroversion, said Debra L. Johnson, Ph.D., UI assistant research scientist in psychology and the study's lead investigator. "We found more evidence that people might be shy or outgoing because of the way their brains are structured, not because of experiences they've had."

    Previous studies have shown that introversion and extroversion are based on variations in brain function, but those studies did not describe all the locations found in this study. The UI researchers examined 18 healthy individuals using positron emission tomography (PET) scans, which can provide a high-resolution image of the entire head.

    The PET scans revealed that introverts have more activity in the frontal lobes of the brain and anterior, or front, thalamus. These areas are activated when a person's brain takes on internal processing such as remembering, problem solving and planning. Extroverts exhibit more activity in the anterior cingulate gyrus, temporal lobes and posterior thalamus. These areas are typically thought to be more involved in sensory processing such as listening, watching or driving.

    The differences in cognitive style and sensory-processing relate to the qualities associated with introversion and extroversion. True introverts are quiet, inwardly focused and reclusive. Extroverts are gregarious, socially active and sensation seeking.

    "Introverts get more of their stimulation internally, whereas extroverts seek outside sources," Johnson said. "Extremely introverted and extroverted personalities are two ends of a continuum, with most people falling somewhere in between."

    Johnson added, "The implication is that one personality trait -- introversion or extroversion - isn't right or wrong. These variations in brain activity suggest that a lot of our individual differences have an underlying biological cause."

    The subjects, 10 men and eight women, first took personality tests to determine the extent to which they were introverts or extroverts. The researchers later had the subjects lie down with their eyes closed while the PET scan measured brain activity.

    "Lying quietly allows the mind to be free and do what it naturally does," Johnson explained. "When a part of the brain becomes active, there is increased blood flow to that region, which shows up on the PET scan."

    The findings were published in the February issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry.


    More Stuff:


    The Introverts Strike Back

    The Difference Between Introverts and Extroverts | Psychology Today

    Top 5 Things Every Extrovert Should Know About Introverts

    It turns out that the distinction between introversion and extroversion is all in your head but I mean this quite literally!

    brain activityIntroverted children enjoy the internal world of thoughts, feelings and fantasies, and theres a physiological reason for this. Researchers using brain scans have found introverts have more brain activity in general, and specifically in the frontal lobes. When these areas are activated, introverts are energized by retrieving long-term memories, problem solving, introspection, complex thinking and planning.

    Extroverts enjoy the external world of things, people and activities. They have more activity in brain areas involved in processing the sensory information were bombarded with daily. Because extroverts have less internally generated brain activity, they search for more external stimuli to energize them. [emphasis added]


    The social gene

    The question remains, How do we get to be an introvert or extrovert? While nothing is all in the genes, there appears to be a genetic factor in our socializing preferences. The novelty-seeking or lust for excitement may be linked to a D4DR gene on chromosome 11. Dean Hamer, chief of gene structure and regulation at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Maryland, studied the D4DR gene and found that it affects the neurotransmitter dopamine, which controls excitement levels and is vital for physical activity and motivation.

    Novelty seekers (wheres the bungee-jumping party?) were found to have a long D4DR gene and were less sensitive to dopamine, a chemical mediator for pleasure and emotion in the brain. The low-novelty seekers had short D4DR genes that were highly sensitive to dopamine. Because they receive enough dopamine in quiet activities, they dont need as much buzz in their lives. They feel more discomfort than enjoyment from thrill-seeking or risk-taking. Too much dopamine and they feel over-stimulated.
    Chemistry of walls and flowers

    The introverted brain has a higher level of internal activity and thinking than the extroverted brain. It is dominated by the long, slow pathway of another neurotransmitter called acetylcholine. Introverts require a limited range of not too much or too little dopamine, another brain chemical, and a good level of acetylcholine to keep a calm feeling instituted. Acetylcholine serves as a trigger to the brain to conserve energy and stimulates good thinking and feeling.

    Laney explains that the extroverted brain just doesnt have as much internal activity going on. So, it scans the external world for stimulation to fuel the shorter, quicker dopamine pathway. The signals from the brain travel to the Full-Throttle (sympathetic nervous) system that controls certain body functions and influences how outies behave, she says.

    But, an extrovert needs its sidekick, adrenaline, to help cook up more dopamine in the brain, Laney says. Like plants to sunlight, their energy comes from the places they go; the people they see. Leave an extrovert alone for two minutes and he will be calling someone on his cell phone.

    So, during these merry days, as extroverts chat away, hands and mouths dancing in a choreographed ballet, try to remember the lament of the introverted Rauch, We can only dream that someday, when our condition is more widely understood, when perhaps an Introverts Rights movement has blossomed and borne fruit, it will not be impolite to say, Im an introvert. You are a wonderful person and I like you. But now please, shush.


    Of course, as with most studies, this is mostly speculation. Interesting, but it's not the Bible. Take it with a grain of salt. (Good luck picking a single grain up.)
    I hope you don't mind me calling you Sonata. I like to give nicknames to people I have affection for. I can never seem to figure out where my youngest son is, so I call him "Waldo", for example.

    I read some of the articles you posted and thought they were very interesting....especially the information on introverts. Probably like many introverts out there, I have always been ASHAMED of my introvertedness. Like it was a disease that I had, almost. While I may not agree with every theory out there, I love the introvert-affirming articles you posted - thank you!!

    I was thinking today about my mom (my adoptive mom) and how things were when I was growing up. I could count on one hand the number of times that my mom ever touched me...including hugging me. I got much of my childhood affection from my cat. :blushing: I was into Lord of the Rings when I was younger and I had a cat that I named Gandolf (he was gray), and I used to dress him up in doll clothes and push him around in my doll buggy. I still can't believe he let me...but he was a VERY patient cat. I also put together a small pre-school class for the children of the employees of my dad's company. They let me hug them to pieces. So, I'm thinking "nurture" really didn't play into my personality type. I am very different from my adoptive parents and have never been close to them.

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