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Thread: Shallow Ns

  1. #31
    ThatGirl
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rachelinpa View Post
    Are there any shallow Ns?

    I've heard arguments that depth is not related to personality type, but I don't think I've ever met a shallow N.
    Like....for sure!

  2. #32
    Member Airius's Avatar
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    Flighty? Perhaps.

    I know I've been guilty.

  3. #33
    IRL is not real Cimarron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sarah
    ...[For SPs and SJs,] philosophizing for the heck of it tends to take a lower priority than, say, getting things done that need to be done which would have immediate value to us now.
    Yes, lower priority.
    You can't spell "justice" without ISTJ.

  4. #34
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ptgatsby View Post
    I don't know about that... Ns that take great effort at thinking about pointless things are still considered "deep" by those that value deepness at the surface level.

    This is just definition hopping. "Shallow" has a negative connotation, but can be associated against concrete thinkers. MBTI asks if you are concrete. Tada!

    The operative word is ability, notably different than preference.
    Yes.

  5. #35
    darkened dreams labyrinthine's Avatar
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    Shallowness in terms of values wouldn't correspond to type as far as I understand it.

    There is a danger in shallowness of thought that could apply to Ns as a type. The idea that "I'm going to use my intuition and jump to the following conclusion" can be a significant problem that can result in prejudicial thinking. iNtuition like any other cognitive function is only as good as the input from which it draws its conclusions. iNtuition must be honed in the same way any other function should be. For example, a person is only intuitive about behavior in others if they have a vast amount of accurate data to draw from. The iNtuitive process of thinking doesn't need every fact lined out linearly before arriving at a conclusion, but it seems especially dangerous to place confidence in such conclusions if they cannot be defended and if they do in fact draw on bad information. To be a deep and accurate thinker as an iNtuitive requires an extra dose of humility and willingness to continually draw in new and better information through observation that isn't distorted by previous assumptions.

    If my last statement is correct, then arrogance in iNtuitive thought might tend to translate into shallowness of thought because it jumps to conclusions in a closed minded manner that isn't teachable.
    Step into my metaphysical room of mirrors.
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    So I guess it means there is trouble until the robins come
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  6. #36
    Senior Member Simplexity's Avatar
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    ^Excellent point. I honestly think that is something a lot of people don't understand or don't necessarily take care to think deeply about when it comes to intuition. You did an excellent job of reasoning out just how intuitive thinking can be both productive and dangerous, I actually had a similar conversation with my friend about how I learn and how he did as a sensor.

    I was struggling to articulate my thoughts like you did, but internally I sort of knew that maybe I might not have a good sense of recall(he didn't believe me when I said I didn't read my notes over and over and over like him) but that through reading a lot of information I could hone my reasoning( intuitive) skills where I didn't have to "memorize" terms, words, or events. He is a history major, and our differing reasoning skills are very evident in our discussions.

    That was sort of a derailment, but I think it is very necessary to understand how your thinking process can contribute to being shallow.
    My cold, snide, intellectual life is just a veneer, behind which lies the plywood of loneliness.

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