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  1. #1
    Senior Member Kora's Avatar
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    Default Neurosis and NTs

    I don't know if this should go to personal threads or whatever.

    Anyway, I was wondering if neurosis is more of an NT thing (or maybe N in general). Does any of you suffer symptoms or are even a diagnosed neurotic? How is it for you? Do you think is there any way to overcome it or at least to live with it?
    If not, do you know any neurotic? What do you see in their behaviour?
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    Senior Member INTJMom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kora View Post
    I don't know if this should go to personal threads or whatever.

    Anyway, I was wondering if neurosis is more of an NT thing (or maybe N in general). Does any of you suffer symptoms or are even a diagnosed neurotic? How is it for you? Do you think is there any way to overcome it or at least to live with it?
    If not, do you know any neurotic? What do you see in their behaviour?
    Could you explain why you want to know?
    Are you using the clinical definition of neurosis?

    According to wiki, which I know is not an authoritative site:
    "The term connotes an actual disorder or disease, but under its general definition, neurosis is a normal human experience, part of the human condition. Most people are affected by neurosis in some form."

  3. #3
    Once Was Synarch's Avatar
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    I think N's are probably more likely to be neurotic in that they're less concrete in their thinking. Conceptual, abstract thinking can lead to troubling questions and then the mind starts chasing its own tail. I envy those who can slow down and just deal with the world as it is.
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    I think the opposite. It's my personal hypothesis that NTs are capable of understanding unusual tendencies in our minds, and are therefore defended against them more than others are.

    An SJ with some form of neurosis isn't a pretty sight. They have no idea what to think or do about it.

  5. #5
    Once Was Synarch's Avatar
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    They may be able to cope better with neurosis, but I still think they may be more neurotic in general. You know?
    "Create like a god, command like a king, work like a slave."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Synarch View Post
    They may be able to cope better with neurosis, but I still think they may be more neurotic in general. You know?
    I know what you mean, and you could be right, but I haven't observed that trend. Which could naturally be because NTs can own neuroses, as opposed to being owned by them. They can be invisible.

  7. #7
    Boring old fossil Night's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Flak View Post
    I know what you mean, and you could be right, but I haven't observed that trend. Which could naturally be because NTs can own neuroses, as opposed to being owned by them. They can be invisible.
    While I like the spirit of this concept, is it possible that you're generalizing a sense of psychological "empowerment" to NTs that might better align on an individual level, as opposed to within an MBTI classification range?

    I'm not necessarily poo-pooing your idea.

    As most know, neurotic behavior is often a coping mechanism, intimately designed to deflect anxiety. Most feel some sense of anxiety at the uncontrollable things in their lives - often without clinical neurosis attached to their coping behavior.

    Are NTs that different?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Night View Post
    While I like the spirit of this concept, is it possible that you're generalizing a sense of psychological "empowerment" to NTs that might better align on an individual level, as opposed to within an MBTI classification range?
    I agree in that the individual is more important in this regard. The topic of discussion though, is NTs in general, and I would say there is a greater tendency in NTs than others to have control over mind. For a few reasons, even including that by being NT in the modern world, we are not only built to seek out and understand knowledge, but it is readily available to us. So,

    The average adult NT has reasonable knowledge and understanding about the function of the brain, and can consider it a quite non-mystical system which they own. If a problem arises to which there is no easy solution, the NT can say (I simplify) "Well, that's too bad. Perhaps we'd better work around this problem and get on with existence."

  9. #9
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Night View Post
    As most know, neurotic behavior is often a coping mechanism, intimately designed to deflect anxiety. Most feel some sense of anxiety at the uncontrollable things in their lives - often without clinical neurosis attached to their coping behavior. Are NTs that different?
    Yes, I think certain types might more easily be susceptible to particular neuroses, but no type is "more neurotic" ... especially if we realize that some aggressive behavior is just neurotic behavior driven against others rather than the self.

    I've seen neurosis defined both as maladjusted coping mechanisms as well as the avoidance of legitimate suffering. (Both definitions have value, I think.)

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Flak View Post
    I agree in that the individual is more important in this regard. The topic of discussion though, is NTs in general, and I would say there is a greater tendency in NTs than others to have control over mind. For a few reasons, even including that by being NT in the modern world, we are not only built to seek out and understand knowledge, but it is readily available to us.
    Really, that should then suit us better to NOT be neurotic -- if we are more easily able to abstractly assess things. There's a lot of S neurosis that occurs because of a lack of N, and they can more easily dissociate and/or repress things they don't want to deal with... or miss the insight that might come more naturally to an N.
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  10. #10
    Boring old fossil Night's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Flak View Post
    I agree in that the individual is more important in this regard. The topic of discussion though, is NTs in general, and I would say there is a greater tendency in NTs than others to have control over mind. For a few reasons, even including that by being NT in the modern world, we are not only built to seek out and understand knowledge, but it is readily available to us. So,

    The average adult NT has reasonable knowledge and understanding about the function of the brain, and can consider it a quite non-mystical system which they own. If a problem arises to which there is no easy solution, the NT can say (I simplify) "Well, that's too bad. Perhaps we'd better work around this problem and get on with existence."
    Interesting.

    How might the strategies of an NT differ from those of, say, an NF?

    As the governing function seems to be a complex system of emotion designed to reduce anxiety/relieve tension, is it possible that the NF would, by virtue of their inherent disposition towards understanding complex emotion, be better situated to understand their personal neurosis than would an NT?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post

    I've seen neurosis defined both as maladjusted coping mechanisms as well as the avoidance of legitimate suffering. (Both definitions have value, I think.)
    In both scenarios, it seems that the individual has an innate desire to rid themselves (alogically, if you like) of the negative stimulus.

    Is this an NT-centric or NF-centric design trait?

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