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Thread: Ti/Te and Math

  1. #11
    Senior Member Lateralus's Avatar
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    I don't know how much function or type has to do with this. I think it has more to do with types of intelligence. For me, math has always seemed like common sense. Where other people have to study and work through examples to understand the material, I usually just 'get it'.

    I'm probably a mathematician in a parallel universe.

  2. #12
    Senior Member substitute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lexlike View Post
    propably persons with Ti as the first process???
    btw i always liked math
    I dunno, I think for me it was more a case of having really shitty teachers and other huge issues I had at school (identity crisis being one but sooo many others) so i was never able to really concentrate or enjoy the actual content. Math lessons were especially traumatic for me when we got told to sit in alphabetical order, resulting in me being next to, for a year, the person that bullied me all the way thru school

    I loved physics - the bullies weren't in my class for that - I was able to relax and take in the lesson and I enjoyed it and never had any trouble following all the math involved in that.

    So... there're a lotta environmental factors I imagine, for other people too, besides their order of cognitive functions
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  3. #13
    Senior Member prplchknz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by substitute View Post
    I dunno, I think for me it was more a case of having really shitty teachers and other huge issues I had at school (identity crisis being one but sooo many others) so i was never able to really concentrate or enjoy the actual content. Math lessons were especially traumatic for me when we got told to sit in alphabetical order, resulting in me being next to, for a year, the person that bullied me all the way thru school

    I loved physics - the bullies weren't in my class for that - I was able to relax and take in the lesson and I enjoyed it and never had any trouble following all the math involved in that.

    So... there're a lotta environmental factors I imagine, for other people too, besides their order of cognitive functions
    I was the same way for chemistry. I never took physics but everyone said I'd probably be decent at it. But I think with chemistry i had a really good teacher.not exactly. But I think what I mean is I found the math more enjoyable and easier to understand in chemistry because it applied to something I was interested in.
    In no likes experiment.

    that is all

    i dunno what else to say so

  4. #14
    ⒺⓉⒷ Eric B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptainChick View Post
    I am mathematically inclined, and even as a young child I had always had an affinity for numbers as well as a deep respect/appreciation for the properties of, and patterns inherent to mathematics. Academically speaking, I have always done well in my math classes, and for what it is worth and perhaps to extrinsically demonstrate my mathematical ability, at the age of 16, I took A.P. calculus during my junior year of high school.

    I think my Te definitely acts as a contributing factor in my ability to reason logically.

    I am, and have always been, a very visual mathematician. Personally, I've always found mathematical computation to be relatively easy but boring and tedious as hell, whereas I've found apprehension/comprehension of mathematical patterns and concepts to be quite stimulating/fascinating/fun.
    Well, it's a sure thing that the Ne comes into play with the patterns. Since you're good with the patterns and properties but think the actual calculation was boring; would you think then that the properties and patterns were more asociated withTe, and the calculation, with Ti? I Thought it might have been the reverse, and this is at the center of what I was asking.

    With the simplest definition of the thinking attitudes being Jung's "internally based logic" vs "externally based logic", it would seem that math would be external. But it seems the logical principles are not only "external", but also universal, and in the case of the feeling attitudes, "universal" [values] actually get grouped together with the internal (introverted) focus. So I imagine that would apply to the thinking side as well.
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  5. #15
    ^He pronks, too! Magic Poriferan's Avatar
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    I personally think that computational and procedural sorts of math should be better performed by STs. Si is really ideal for mathematics.

    More theoretically math is probably more appropriate for NTs. I personally can handle mathematical logic pretty well, but I'm horrible at doing math. I struggling in an introductory algebra class. My Ti isn't really helping me here.
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  6. #16
    Senior Member dnivera's Avatar
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    Math rules!

    What percentage of accountants and actuaries are STJ, like 90?

    I always got better grades in high school math than my INTJ brother because I had better attention to detail. I learn from practice and repitition, which is great for predictable math tests - just study and you'll get 100. My brother didn't care for the boring, repititious HW problem sets so he didn't score as high. He, however, far exceeded me in college-level math where creativity was required for problem solving, and most tests were not based on previously learned material.
    Si>Ti>Te>Ne>Fe>Ni>Fi>Se

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    Sensing (S) 56.25% Intuitive (N) 43.75%
    Thinking (T) 61.29% Feeling (F) 38.71%
    Judging (J) 71.88% Perceiving (P) 28.13%

  7. #17
    ⒺⓉⒷ Eric B's Avatar
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    I guess this Si issue would also be a good explanation. Si is relief for me, and I'm good at nostalgia with it, but not some other uses of it, and in later grades of school, it was just starting to kick off, and the memorizing aspect of it was the hardest aspect of it for me, with the formulas and stuff. Yet I too had on my own identified many properties and patterns, but in numbers themselves, and geometry (specifically, polygons). So I had a great mind for math, yet always had problems with the [assigned] work part of it.
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  8. #18
    Senior Member mlittrell's Avatar
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    im pretty sure Albert Einstein was an INTP.

    as for my opinion, i think both would be equally good at math but would go about it in two different ways. or see it in two different lights.
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  9. #19
    `~~Philosoflying~~` SillySapienne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zago View Post
    However, I think that Ni and Ne might prove to be the biggest help to coming up with new ideas in math or solving problems that you aren't really sure how to solve.
    You might be onto something, here.

    I have always been chastised and at times even penalized by my math teachers for being a renegade "step-skipper" in solving equations. LOL, I wouldn't be able to count the amount of times, "Show your work!" has been scribbled in red next to my, correct answers!!! Also, as a child, word problems were my absolute favorite, and I relished in finding alternate or innovative ways to arrive at their solutions.


    Quote Originally Posted by Lateralus View Post
    For me, math has always seemed like common sense. Where other people have to study and work through examples to understand the material, I usually just 'get it'.

    I'm probably a mathematician in a parallel universe.
    Lol, math has always intuitively/instinctively made sense to me as well, and growing up I often found myself feeling utterly baffled by many of my peers' apparent inability/difficulty towards grasping what I found/thought to be ridiculously easy/obvious/logical/simple rules/applications.

    Math just made sense and I couldn't understand/fathom how this was not the case for everyone.

    Quote Originally Posted by substitute View Post
    I dunno, I think for me it was more a case of having really shitty teachers and other huge issues I had at school (identity crisis being one but sooo many others) so i was never able to really concentrate or enjoy the actual content. Math lessons were especially traumatic for me when we got told to sit in alphabetical order, resulting in me being next to, for a year, the person that bullied me all the way thru school

    I loved physics - the bullies weren't in my class for that - I was able to relax and take in the lesson and I enjoyed it and never had any trouble following all the math involved in that.

    So... there're a lotta environmental factors I imagine, for other people too, besides their order of cognitive functions
    I hate fucking bullies, that really sucks, and I'm sorry that you had to be subjected to that kind of torture, and on a daily basis, no less!!!

    :sad:

    Hmm, I think, generally speaking, math teachers suck major ass!!!

    I can't recall a single math teacher or professor in the history of my formal education that I loved or respected. *All* of them were socially inept, some were vile, most were robotic and a few, (my favorite of the bunch), were more on the gentle/neutral side.

    I think I can safely say that I've never really been "taught" math, rather, for as long as I can remember, I have either taught myself or learned directly from the textbook.

    As for environmental prohibiting factors, I was rarely, if ever, encouraged by my teachers, after all, girls aren't good at math.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric B View Post
    Well, it's a sure thing that the Ne comes into play with the patterns. Since you're good with the patterns and properties but think the actual calculation was boring; would you think then that the properties and patterns were more asociated withTe, and the calculation, with Ti? I Thought it might have been the reverse, and this is at the center of what I was asking.
    Ti, I'd imagine, would foster and facilitate more adept computational skills amongst mathematicians.

    As of late, academically speaking, I have somewhat deviated from my mathematical roots, but I must admit, or add, that I did derive a slight sense of joy/satisfaction in systematically calculating derivatives or solving any other "non-thinking" linearly natured problems/equations, because I could listen to music while working on them and in the process would fall into a kind of rhythmic and relaxing zone. Tangent, sorry. :/

    With the simplest definition of the thinking attitudes being Jung's "internally based logic" vs "externally based logic", it would seem that math would be external. But it seems the logical principles are not only "external", but also universal, and in the case of the feeling attitudes, "universal" [values] actually get grouped together with the internal (introverted) focus. So I imagine that would apply to the thinking side as well.
    I find logical principles to be innately apprehensible , for me, logic is a simple and straight forward cognitive tool/means of discerning possible or probable truths/outcomes given a set of conditions/variables contained within a particular scenario/problem.

    Logic, like language, is a universally human cognitive function/capacity.
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  10. #20
    Senior Thread Terminator Aerithria's Avatar
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    I love math. I grasp it well, and I've always enjoyed playing around with algebra and formulas. It's interesting to see all the geometry-lovers, because I've always found that to be my least favourite part of it, besides statistics (bleh!). Regardless of how much I like it, however, it's never really been in my interest to have math as a career, even though I'm obviously suited for it. For me, math is a tool, and while I can think of it conceptually and figure out that kind of thing easily, to me it's always been about how to apply it, which is why I love physics so much. Math on its own seems odd, because it's like carrying a screwdriver around and refusing to screw anything with it.

    Here's where I think you'd find the biggest difference between Ti and Te and math: Ti people are probably more inclined to like math conceptually and are probably more likely to appreciate it as it is, whereas Te people seem to need an area to apply it to.
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