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  1. #61
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildcat View Post
    Only in America.
    Really? They're certainly not the norm here, so I was assuming they existed in other places but weren't the norm there either.

    The Reggio Emilio approach started in Italy, I think. Same with Montessori, although I think the "classic" style is unnecessarily rigid- I visited one to see if it was a good fit for my daughter, and I was a bit put off by the teacher correcting children on the right way to play this or that. I also understand that Waldorf schools are common in Europe, although they have another set of problems altogether.
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  2. #62
    Senior Member celesul's Avatar
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    I like school, though I used to dislike it. In preschool and kindergarten, I went to a Montessori school where we learned stuff like long multiplication or a lot of geography really early. It was fun though, because we had beads and maps to help, and we chose what to learn. The teachers let us do what we wanted most of the time too. We were all just really curious. I think I mostly learned math there, while my sister liked geography more.

    Then I went to a school I hated. They had rigid memorization and everything. For 3rd I switched to my current school. It's private, and the elementary school was ok, but still very strict. I didn't realize how strict it was until more recently, when I saw what normal elementary school kids do. I didn't do very well at first, because I'm bad at simple memorization.

    In fifth grade, I wasn't doing that well, but my math teacher figured out that I understood the material, but I had trouble computing because I got distracted in the middle of a problem, and then restarted it in the wrong place. He put me in a math class that had about 30 kids and met once a week to teach more advanced math. The kids who passed it, about 10 of us, got put in the advanced track. Because my school is rather small, it only tracked math until high school. My school gradually becomes more relaxed the higher the grade, which suits me. I had trouble until I started ADD meds, because I couldn't concentrate.

    I'm now in 10th grade, and one of the top in my grade. I'm good at standardixed tests, because by crossreferencing questions I can figure out the answer with a bit of common sense. I'm not the kid who studies nonstop, but the kid who figures out the most efficent way of getting straight A's. Last year I figured out what grade I needed on each final to end up with an A. So I studied a few hours for 1 final, but the others I just reviewed a bit. I didn't study at all for math or vocab because I could have gotten as low as a B- and get an A in the class, and I know all the vocab from reading novels. I actually got a B- on th math final.
    "'You scoundrel, you have wronged me,' hissed the philosopher. 'May you live forever!'" - Ambrose Bierce

  3. #63
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
    Really? They're certainly not the norm here, so I was assuming they existed in other places but weren't the norm there either.

    The Reggio Emilio approach started in Italy, I think. Same with Montessori, although I think the "classic" style is unnecessarily rigid- I visited one to see if it was a good fit for my daughter, and I was a bit put off by the teacher correcting children on the right way to play this or that. I also understand that Waldorf schools are common in Europe, although they have another set of problems altogether.
    I thought the only Waldorf I know is the Astor house at 301 Park Avenue. Now I see you mean the Steiner school.
    Yes, we had the Steiner and the Montessori schools originally. Unfortunately we had a longtime Marxist cabinet minister for education. He refused to renew the permits to any of the private schools. He said only state can be allowed to teach. At the same time the state schools deteriorated badly.

    The one thing I remember at school was a large painting of Pestalozzi on the wall of the school lobby. I understand the ideas were formed after him.
    Something went wrong on the way.

    Neither my father nor my brother or my daughter or me learned anything at school.
    I learned to swim, however. That is because swimming was not a part of the school curriculum in my day.

  4. #64
    filling some space UnitOfPopulation's Avatar
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    I always managed to get barely high enough grades to enter the most prestigious educational facilities in my country. In all the school levels I went, there were always people who fared better, tho.

  5. #65
    Senior Member Veneti's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Santtu View Post
    I always managed to get barely high enough grades to enter the most prestigious educational facilities in my country. In all the school levels I went, there were always people who fared better, tho.
    Thats not always a bad thing though, if you have that competitive spirit then you keep trying harder... its not till after graduation when you continue learning on the same trajectory that you go way beyond your "equals" at school/university etc.

  6. #66

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    Quote Originally Posted by Santtu View Post
    I always managed to get barely high enough grades to enter the most prestigious educational facilities in my country. In all the school levels I went, there were always people who fared better, tho.
    IIT?

    Accept the past. Live for the present. Look forward to the future.
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    "[A] scientist looking at nonscientific problems is just as dumb as the next guy." Richard Feynman
    "[P]etabytes of [] data is not the same thing as understanding emergent mechanisms and structures." Jim Crutchfield

  7. #67
    filling some space UnitOfPopulation's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ygolo View Post
    IIT?
    Sorry, I dont get you. Mind explaining what you ment?

  8. #68

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    Quote Originally Posted by Santtu View Post
    Sorry, I don't get you. Mind explaining what you ment?
    Sorry, I meant was your school an Indian Institute of Technology?

    But I guessed your country wrong.

    Accept the past. Live for the present. Look forward to the future.
    Robot Fusion
    "As our island of knowledge grows, so does the shore of our ignorance." John Wheeler
    "[A] scientist looking at nonscientific problems is just as dumb as the next guy." Richard Feynman
    "[P]etabytes of [] data is not the same thing as understanding emergent mechanisms and structures." Jim Crutchfield

  9. #69
    filling some space UnitOfPopulation's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ygolo View Post
    Sorry, I meant was your school an Indian Institute of Technology?

    But I guessed your country wrong.
    I live in Finland, and none of our universities are particularly sought-after world-wide, so it's not that a big deal. We do care greatly about education nationally, tho.

    I got accepted to both the University of Helsinki and Helsinki University of Technology, where I applied, and I chose to enter the latter. I recall being sorry that there was one Master's Programme that had higher entrance requirements than the one I entered, implying a lower than the highest standard of teaching.

    I thought at that time that any person with a measure of skill or talent should be fiercly competetive and open about it, and wondered what bullshit this "humbleness" thing was.

    I am nuts when I still sometimes irrationally get on the mood that I or my company or organization have to be the best. I consider that one of my greatest character flaws, if I ever notice myself thinking like that anymore in a place where it's not welcomed. I dont know where I got it that I have to compete and be a total self-important ass while doing it.

    I still love the feeling of competition, provided that it's in a good place. The collection of such places has grown thin lately. I'm more inclined to co-operate at this age of 29, or just hide my competetive tendencies in some situations.

    This was such a problem earlier, that when national statistics were compiled and graduates of another school turned out to have slightly (1%) greater income, my school lost much of its prestige in my eyes.

    I'm serious with this, I dont know what made me like that. Doing retrospective analysis of my problems, I suspect something along the lines of OC and/or narcissism, or just plain old-fashioned being good at young age and getting too much used to it. Being good in chosen interests and being blind to other interests, I might add.

    Hm, I did went grossly out of topic.

    Perhaps I should bring the topic of competetiveness to another thread.

    Shoot me

  10. #70
    Member thirtyfour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FDG View Post
    Strange. While I am good at school, I've found myself much more easily adaptable to the working realm. Might this be realted to activity levels? Extraverts have it easier on entry-level jobs that require less intellectual prowess but more moving capacity and higher workloads in a given amounts of time. Introverts fare slightly better in academic settings where they are allowed to think problems more thoroughly - a soft spot of mine has always been excessive speed in problem solving which, in school, leads to not perfect marks, but at the workplace seems to be appreciated since approximation is enough to guarantee results.
    I certainly think that Eness (and Jness most certainly) have a lot to do with it. I don't think I'm bad at work (especially the kind of work I do, they let me sit in an office and just research and write) I just don't enjoy it that much. I actually liked school.

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