User Tag List

First 567

Results 61 to 68 of 68

  1. #61
    mod love baby... Lady_X's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    MBTI
    ENFP
    Enneagram
    9w1 sx/so
    Posts
    18,086

    Default

    firstly i think way too many things annoy you.

    secondly...yeah for sure i do. i try to cram as many of them as i can in one sentence....usually.

    i'm thinking you're just not getting that there is more than one way to talk...you can be direct...or you can have certain words peppered throughout that actually add more meaning and more precision to your words...less decisive...but certainly more accurate.

    example: yeah, no. means more than no. it means i'm acknowledging your assumption of my answer being no is correct.
    There can’t be any large-scale revolution until there’s a personal revolution, on an individual level. It’s got to happen inside first.
    -Jim Morrison

  2. #62
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    637

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Southern Kross View Post
    I've tried to stop doing this ("like" in particular) but I can't; it's too ingrained in my patterns of speech. I even made it a New Year's resolution to reduce it but it didn't work. I've had people tease me about it and I completely realise it makes me sound like an imbecile and I really hate that, but what can I do?

    Also, I really don't think a non-native speaker should judge either. You won't be as aware of the reasons behind using so called "useless" words. I find they almost always serve a purpose; they communicate uncertainty, or emphasis, or are an attempt to buy time (to think what to say next), or are an attempt to connect with the other person. True it can be (a bad) habit to a degree but they still mean something.
    I used to tease people when speaking my native language around here. Usually the teasing was ending up with them being pissed off because they don't see a problem in such things. It was fun in latter grades, seeing my native language teacher teasing the students as well. Some of them were so pissed off that they lashed out on the teacher a couple of times.

    So you're saying that a non-native speaker is unable to be aware of the reasons? That's just a plain dumb statement. You can communicate in a different way, without sounding dumb, and give the same impression. You can use different sentence formulation, you can use different words, tone of voice too. And that's just 3 things I can think of instantly. To quote you, "I've had people tease me about it and I completely realise it makes me sound like an imbecile and I really hate that."

    Quote Originally Posted by Philosorapteuse View Post
    I dunno. I might take you very slightly less seriously if you punctuate every sentence with "like", but it's the inflection that irritates me more than the word itself. Saying "Yahh" instead of "yeah" annoys me though. Which is unreasonable as that's probably a regional thing, but it makes me think of Sloaney girls in pashminas and ludicrous oversized sunglasses. We've all got verbal tics though. One of mine is appending "If that makes sense" to everything. I had no idea I did this until my mum told me, in very restrained tones, that it *did* make sense and wasn't bizarre enough a statement to warrent the question...
    "Yeaaaah" instead of "Yea," I don't find that particularly irritating. People don't use it often, only in certain situations when, as I see it, it is applicable. From my experience anyway.

    As for "if that makes sense," that isn't annoying if it occurs rarely, but if it occurs often, it can be as annoying as what's mentioned in the OP. It's possible that it makes sense to append this, but that happens very rarely as I see it. The other times, unless it happens very rarely, it can be extra-fun to tease people about it.

    Quote Originally Posted by JivinJeffJones View Post
    Written down they're a little annoying. Conversationally though they have their purpose. I met an expat South African lady (living in Australia) who told me she was perceived as a bossy know-it-all who was intolerant of dissenting opinions. People were under the impression that her opinions were expressed in a manner strongly suggesting "This is exactly how it is. I'm 100% confident of this opinion so that's the end of the conversation." Since she didn't feel like this fairly reflected her attitude she dug a little deeper and found that it was simply her speech patterns as a native Afrikaans speaker. So she had to teach herself things like ending sentences on an upward intonation, and adding "know what I mean" etc. After that she had a lot less trouble with being misunderstood.

    So yeah these sayings are more about modifying connection than modifying meaning. If you don't want to use them then don't use them, but don't be surprised if people you talk to unaccountably find you a bit of a prat.
    Weren't people able to communicate 50 years ago? They didn't use those words, or at least not as much as they do today. If we go back 100 years ago, I doubt there were any people who were using them. (them = at least most of them)

    Quote Originally Posted by Redbone View Post
    I do it. Very guilty of "I know, right?" and "I'm hearing you." I try to tone it down depending on who I'm talking with...sometimes. Hell, I don't know.

    English has been and always will be a mangled language...no quitting allowed at this late date.
    Oh, I do find that one annoying. The level of annoyance grows trice as fast as the times it occurs in the conversation.

    Quote Originally Posted by Il Morto Che Parla View Post
    I think a P in general is more likely to be open minded, and see that something can have value, even if it isn't perfect.

    In my life, I do a lot of telephone selling. There, it's very important to constantly let people know you are listening, so I am constantly saying things like "that's great", "absolutely", "uh huh", "I see what you mean", etc. Maybe they are "useless" strictly from the point of view of conveying a fact. However they are useful in order to build a rapport with the other person.

    Even when writing, somebody may wish to engage their audience, with some tangents, some...like...connecting words, to make the text seem more, kind of, conversational, I guess.

    SEE WHAT I DID THERE

    Ok so kind of an exaggerated example (and again), but you see my point. It depends on my audience and on the effect one wishes to convey.

    I'm going to the dark side for a bit: everything is useful in a certain light, and nothing is perfect. Back to the white side: that doesn't mean I agree with it.

    Phone sales, well that's a different situation. There you have to pretend a lot, probably lie a lot, be nice, adopt, etc.. I used to have... Let's call that business calls, a few a day. I used to do this as well, so the (let's call them) employees would see where I'm coming from and follow my orders with less questioning (or to be more precise - comparing).

    I'm talking about every-day conversations here though.

    Quote Originally Posted by SilkRoad View Post
    Oh I get it. I guess I've noticed it a bit in Kiwis, but not to a super-annoying degree. Generally I like the accent.

    I think of my "likes" and so on as word whiskers. They can be annoying if over-used, but I think they can be somewhat disarming too.

    Being INFJ and reading a lot and all that, I can get a bit heavy in conversation sometimes, so I think it amuses people when I say things like "I was reading Paul Celan, the surrealist hermetic German poet, and he is just like so awesome. The events of the Holocaust instilled a trauma in him which was like, really bad." That's probably a fairly accurate depiction of how I speak, although it's in no way calculated or deliberate.
    I'd find that very irritating.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    Your posts provide a lot of interesting details about your self.

    It interests me in light of what another poster told me lately about people visiting the site and why they werent posting anymore.
    I don't get what's the relation between me and people not posting anymore. You need to be more detailed.

    Quote Originally Posted by Aesthete View Post
    I will use "Yeah, no" from time to time; even in my native language thanks to some guy I know. I only use "I mean" when others don't understand what I'm trying to say or I need to expand. Otherwise, I hardly use any of these.
    Yea, that's where I see "I mean" as applicable. If someone expresses his misunderstanding in what you just said, I do use "I mean" or "I meant" or "Let me rephrase that" or "I'm gonna rephrase that" or "What I meant was." Probably something else.

    Quote Originally Posted by entropie View Post
    Oh yes, its pretty functional and you can recombine at will.

    The longest word, which is even in the dictionary is: Donaudampfschiffahrtselektrizitätenhauptbetriebsw erkbauunterbeamtengesellschaft

    It means Donau (a river) steam boat electricity main factory construction sub-company
    I bet the employees curse a few times while saying it for the first couple of months. Until they learn how to say it properly.

    Quote Originally Posted by Il Morto Che Parla View Post
    translator is such an INTP job.
    Hm, I hate translation. I can't even translate half the words I know in English to my native language...

    Quote Originally Posted by Fluffywolf View Post
    The germans have their own words for literally everything! Even though I'd say my german is not that bad, Reading a car manual in german (we've got a lot of mercedes/setra) can be a real pain!
    I think that's a good thing. Every language is ought to be different, instead of implementing English words.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lady X View Post
    firstly i think way too many things annoy you.

    secondly...yeah for sure i do. i try to cram as many of them as i can in one sentence....usually.

    i'm thinking you're just not getting that there is more than one way to talk...you can be direct...or you can have certain words peppered throughout that actually add more meaning and more precision to your words...less decisive...but certainly more accurate.

    example: yeah, no. means more than no. it means i'm acknowledging your assumption of my answer being no is correct.
    I think you should read most of this post, as it addresses everything you said.

  3. #63
    Senior Member JivinJeffJones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INFP
    Posts
    3,698

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Typoz View Post
    Weren't people able to communicate 50 years ago? They didn't use those words, or at least not as much as they do today. If we go back 100 years ago, I doubt there were any people who were using them. (them = at least most of them)
    I doubt that very much. Literature is no basis for judgement. Maybe not the words you highlighted, but I'm sure they had equivalents. Possibly more verbose equivalents, but still equivalents.

  4. #64
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    637

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JivinJeffJones View Post
    I doubt that very much. Literature is no basis for judgement. Maybe not the words you highlighted, but I'm sure they had equivalents. Possibly more verbose equivalents, but still equivalents.
    Have you interacted with old people, especially those reluctant to change? And even better if that was 10 or 20 years ago.

  5. #65
    Senior Member JivinJeffJones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INFP
    Posts
    3,698

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Typoz View Post
    Have you interacted with old people, especially those reluctant to change? And even better if that was 10 or 20 years ago.
    Maybe old people are less prone to using them than younger people, but old people are also generally more certain and less apologetic of their opinions (ridiculous though some of them may be). Especially those reluctant to change.

  6. #66
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    637

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JivinJeffJones View Post
    Maybe old people are less prone to using them than younger people, but old people are also generally more certain and less apologetic of their opinions (ridiculous though some of them may be). Especially those reluctant to change.
    A 40 or 50-year-old 10 or 20 years ago. You wouldn't hear him saying "He's like big." 40-year-olds do use those words nowadays, and 50-year-olds don't mind them too much too.

  7. #67
    Lay the coin on my tongue SilkRoad's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    6w5 sp/sx
    Posts
    3,938

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Typoz View Post
    I'd find that very irritating.

    I never doubted that for a moment.
    Female
    INFJ
    Enneagram 6w5 sp/sx


    I DOORSLAMMING

  8. #68
    Listening Oaky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    5w6 sp/so
    Socionics
    SLI None
    Posts
    6,168

    Default

    EDIT: friend posted a post in my place... sorry language...

Similar Threads

  1. How much do you use swear words?
    By kotoshinohaisha in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 05-21-2017, 01:24 PM
  2. Do you think mostly in words or something else
    By Zergling in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 111
    Last Post: 02-25-2010, 06:27 PM
  3. What Enneagram Test Do You Use?
    By Trobon in forum Enneagram
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 11-15-2009, 11:29 PM
  4. Do you use MBTI professionally?
    By dnivera in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-28-2008, 09:42 PM
  5. Which Layout Style Do You Use, Comprende?
    By Mempy in forum The Fluff Zone
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 03-19-2008, 08:55 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO