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Thread: Christian NTs

  1. #151
    Senior Member BAJ's Avatar
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    So reading the preceding, it follows that...Jesus is about "Peace", but wants to cut your spirit in half with a sword made of "Spirit" or "words" or "something." My yoke is easy he says, but first I'm going to cut you (or your spirit).

    I think first, the sword must cut you from the process of logical thought, considering the enormous body of contradictions, paradoxes, and problems with Christianity, depending on how you interpret it.

    Do you believe the ark story? If so, how did they deal with a year of food and poop? How did they feed the lions?

    Do believe in the old Earth or young Earth? Why or why not?

    I have higher consideration for the flavor of Christian who considers the whole Bible to be fables, but in many Christians' views, those persons are not Christian.

    I am curious who believes what. There are around a billion different interpretations, which can be lumped into groups, and as @Victor pointed out, some of these groups have major labels, which believe theirs to be the exclusive truth. For example, Russian Orthodox believe they are "the truth." Pity those not born in Russia.

    Do you believe the entire Bible at literal or not?

    If so, how do you explain ark story, early creation, etc?

    If not, how much cafeteria style are you? Is it "partially true", and if so what parts of the buffet do you accept or discount?

  2. #152
    Senior Member BAJ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nerd Girl View Post
    That's all irrelevant. This thread is titled "Christian NTs" [out yourselves].

    Therefore, the simple answer to all of your questions [above] is God.

    God is in control.

    God is in control of "what"?

    Second, this is the suspension of logical discourse I was talking about. In fact, "God" can be exchanged with "giant rug that I sweep everything under."

    As defined here, "God" can be exchanged with almost anything, word, term or concept. It can mean a wide variety of things, rendered meaningless by the diversity of things it can be exchanged for.

    This to the side for a second, I've had periods of Christianity fluctuating with various forms of Buddhism or whatever. But in my case, I have an excuse...being NF...I operate based on personal story, emotion, and anecdote. Thus, my story and current more Atheistic brand of Agnosticism, is personal, and based on personal trial and testing, and exposure to facets of human relationship and experience.

    Yet, to simply say for the record, "Yes, I'm a Christian", satisfies the context of the thread, but it is also shallow and meaningless due to the great diversity of what that can mean, and it offers no satisfaction of meaning. Unless you explain what exactly what you mean by Christian and what your justifications are, then it has no more meaning than saying you fed your pet unicorn this morning. It has no more meaning than taking a cloud shaped like a rabbit to mean that the Eastern bunny exists.

    I once talked to a guy who was very serious about studying the Bible. He was in my martial arts class, going lengthy, detailed Bible studies. I asked him about it one time and he explained to me, that according to the definition he'd been taught, a Christian is a "White Person", meaning someone of Caucasian decent, some sort of race-line doctrine.

    Thus, if I didn't know better, I could thank all the Christians in this thread that they have told me they are Caucasians. Thank you.

  3. #153
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    Quote Originally Posted by BAJ View Post
    God is in control of "what"?

    Second, this is the suspension of logical discourse I was talking about. In fact, "God" can be exchanged with "giant rug that I sweep everything under."

    As defined here, "God" can be exchanged with almost anything, word, term or concept. It can mean a wide variety of things, rendered meaningless by the diversity of things it can be exchanged for.

    This to the side for a second, I've had periods of Christianity fluctuating with various forms of Buddhism or whatever. But in my case, I have an excuse...being NF...I operate based on personal story, emotion, and anecdote. Thus, my story and current more Atheistic brand of Agnosticism, is personal, and based on personal trial and testing, and exposure to facets of human relationship and experience.

    Yet, to simply say for the record, "Yes, I'm a Christian", satisfies the context of the thread, but it is also shallow and meaningless due to the great diversity of what that can mean, and it offers no satisfaction of meaning. Unless you explain what exactly what you mean by Christian and what your justifications are, then it has no more meaning than saying you fed your pet unicorn this morning. It has no more meaning than taking a cloud shaped like a rabbit to mean that the Eastern bunny exists.

    I once talked to a guy who was very serious about studying the Bible. He was in my martial arts class, going lengthy, detailed Bible studies. I asked him about it one time and he explained to me, that according to the definition he'd been taught, a Christian is a "White Person", meaning someone of Caucasian decent, some sort of race-line doctrine.

    Thus, if I didn't know better, I could thank all the Christians in this thread that they have told me they are Caucasians. Thank you.
    Again...

    That's all irrelevant. This thread is titled "Christian NTs" [out yourselves]. This was not intended to be a philosophical discussion.

    Therefore, the simple answer to all of your questions [above] is God. God is in control.

    For an in-depth analysis of Christianity, you ought to research the threads under the "Philosophy and Spirituality" forum. That's also the place to ask questions. If you're posting in this thread, it's assumed that you're a Christian NT, and you're outing yourself.

  4. #154
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nerd Girl View Post
    Again...

    That's all irrelevant. This thread is titled "Christian NTs" [out yourselves]. This was not intended to be a philosophical discussion.

    Therefore, the simple answer to all of your questions [above] is God. God is in control.

    For an in-depth analysis of Christianity, you ought to research the threads under the "Philosophy and Spirituality" forum. That's also the place to ask questions. If you're posting in this thread, it's assumed that you're a Christian NT, and you're outing yourself.
    Ah, Okay!

    I didn't realize how irrelevant I was! Since my posting is irrelevant then I guess I'm irrelevant!

    I'll leave you to your cocoon. God has successfully removed what is irrelevant to you. Congratulate yourself! PTL!

    /leaves thread

  5. #155
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    This is a mighty fine thread!


  6. #156
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    Quote Originally Posted by BAJ View Post
    Do you believe the ark story? If so, how did they deal with a year of food and poop? How did they feed the lions?

    Do believe in the old Earth or young Earth? Why or why not?

    Do you believe the entire Bible at literal or not?

    If so, how do you explain ark story, early creation, etc?
    As someone who is not a hardcore Bible fanatic, it doesn't matter too much to me what's true and what's not true in the Bible, especially the old testament. I know how to Bible got to where it is, and it's possible that details are wrong. I believe there was guy a named Noah and a big flood and there was a guy named Abraham. I don't think we can be certain every detail written about them is absolutely true. Since my faith doesn't rest on the Bible being perfect, it doesn't matter if everything written about Noah or Abraham is true.

    Why do ask about the details of the ark situation when God can solve problems like Emeril adds spices? "BAM!" and then it's gone. Also, in the NT in Acts, it says "the gospel was preached in all the world." Does that mean Australia, North America, and all those other remote places? No. It could also apply to the Noah situation. Maybe not the whole world, but what they thought of as the world was flooded. Having a problem bringing things back afterwards? "BAM!" Problem solved.

    I don't really take the beginning of Genesis to be much of a creation story. It is more a laying forth of spiritual principles. I believe the whole world was shaped and developed outside of what God intended it to be like. For example, I don't believe God would want to create animals that live off of killing other animals. I recently noticed in Isaiah it says something like, "On My holy mountain, the lion will graze like the ox" (perhaps another grazing animal). That does leave a problem of when and why the world went off track when it comes to how God would be running things. I don't know how to answer that.

  7. #157
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    From the german wikipedia (I hope its readable, let google translate it cause too lazy):

    After many years of research developed in 1997, the U.S. Marine geologists Walter Pitman and William Ryan, the theory that the flood water go on a break back into the Black Sea. In their view, this has taken place, as the world after the end of the last ice age by melting glaciers and increased sea level so that all of the Mediterranean also raised about the 7th and Millennium BC, reached the level of the Bosporus. Within a short time, so the water level increases in the Valley for more than 100 meters. Mark Siddall has developed a virtual physical model of the trench on the Bosphorus and the Black Sea. On this basis he was able to simulate all flood scenarios:

    "When the Black Sea's dam was broken, the water flowed through the Bosporus, the Black Sea basin reached a gigantic crash, and have come downstream from the crash zone has an impressive jet stream, a fast stream of water along the shoreline went there and have plowed a deep trench in the floor must be. "

    William Ryan checked with sonar the bottom of the Black Sea. The analyzes showed that the ditch is located precisely where Siddall had predicted it. New drill core samples were analyzed by Yossi Mart: "From the studies we can infer that the transition from sea to sea was very abrupt." The mussel discovery confirms the theory of sudden sea water invasion that toppled with ten times the force of Niagara Falls to the valley [27].

    The latest findings contradict this earlier theories, such as by Teofilo Abrajano, who represented his studies in 2002 showing that freshwater is from the Black Sea only in the Sea of ​​Marmara and then flowed into the Mediterranean. [28] recent research challenging the thesis of Ryan and Pitman in question. [29]

    Monsoon climate theory [Edit]

    The geoscientists Helge Arz and Frank Lammy by the DFG Research Center Ocean Margins studied marine sediments from the northern Red Sea and found in 2003 that the now very dry region even thousands of years ago by a long wet period - a monsoon-like weather system -. Was characterized [30] the researchers found that the surface waters of the Red Sea in the period between about 7000 to 4500 BC had a significantly lower salt content than at present. A monsoon-like climate was the result, similar to the climate of the Indian Ocean, which until about 5000 bc weather events in the Middle East dominated. Studies of pollen and cave deposits hardened the Israeli-monsoon scenario.
    [URL]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tEBvftJUwDw&t=0s[/URL]

  8. #158
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    /* Remember, God removed me, so I started discussing this in the "philosophy and religion" section instead.

    However, I will say that, when I still considered myself Christian and originally tested as INTP with very weak "T", I always interpreted the Bible somewhat Liberally. I never believed other races of men went to hell just because they weren't born in Christian area.

    Likewise, I easily rationalized things like the flood. In ancient times, there were likely many floods, with some being very large and destructive, and there were probably also old men who kept animals on boats, and everyone thought the guy was crazy for keeping them animals on the boat. It's not difficult. I'm not truly hung up on this in myself...

    But there are people who seriously believe this exactly literally, and they generally believe you are going to hell if you don't interpret things their way.

    There is a Christian school in the next state which even went so far as to construct a scale model of the ark to educate children into fully accepting the truth of the story. It's a true scale model, with...supposedly to scale...plastic dinosaurs walking up to the ark. Supposedly, according to their literature, you could easily fit all the animals on it. But examining their scale model, it looks like only about 600 pairs will fit based on how it is displayed...

    This is because the want to illustrate that there is plenty of space, "See? They have lots of room to move around and drink water."

    I wonder if any of the children made the connection and said, "Gee, it looks like only 15 pairs per section, and 38 sections. That's 570 pairs. Something doesn't add up." I used to think like that...at times. I have my moments...even as INFP...I sometimes can reason. So my question...which I continued in the "philosophy and religion" section is how rational types process religious contradictions.

    Yet, I've changed to discussing this over there in the other sub-forum...if someone wants to discuss it...or explain it privately. I've been informed...by two members that this thread is like church. It is a place of encouragement between Christians, no non-believers allowed.

    I agree with their statement that my posting questions in this thread is out of context, and inappropriate, but since two people commented on the ark story, and the thread doesn't seem to be moving much otherwise, I chose to state in a friendly, non-argumentative way (hopefully) that such a story doesn't really (I mean really) bother me since I can find rationalizations, and I'd be happy to discuss it elsewhere. True fundamentalists have always irritated me by their very nature, and that did (or does) bother me. These guys have crocodiles displayed in the same compartment with zebras...teaching this as truth. They have a tub of green plants in the feeding bowl of a carnivorous dinosaur...

    Never mind...enjoy everyone!

    Feel free and happy!


  9. #159
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    Quote Originally Posted by entropie View Post
    From the german wikipedia (I hope its readable, let google translate it cause too lazy):

    After many years of research developed in 1997, the U.S. Marine geologists Walter Pitman and William Ryan, the theory that the flood water go on a break back into the Black Sea. In their view, this has taken place, as the world after the end of the last ice age by melting glaciers and increased sea level so that all of the Mediterranean also raised about the 7th and Millennium BC, reached the level of the Bosporus. Within a short time, so the water level increases in the Valley for more than 100 meters. Mark Siddall has developed a virtual physical model of the trench on the Bosphorus and the Black Sea. On this basis he was able to simulate all flood scenarios:

    "When the Black Sea's dam was broken, the water flowed through the Bosporus, the Black Sea basin reached a gigantic crash, and have come downstream from the crash zone has an impressive jet stream, a fast stream of water along the shoreline went there and have plowed a deep trench in the floor must be. "

    William Ryan checked with sonar the bottom of the Black Sea. The analyzes showed that the ditch is located precisely where Siddall had predicted it. New drill core samples were analyzed by Yossi Mart: "From the studies we can infer that the transition from sea to sea was very abrupt." The mussel discovery confirms the theory of sudden sea water invasion that toppled with ten times the force of Niagara Falls to the valley [27].

    The latest findings contradict this earlier theories, such as by Teofilo Abrajano, who represented his studies in 2002 showing that freshwater is from the Black Sea only in the Sea of ​​Marmara and then flowed into the Mediterranean. [28] recent research challenging the thesis of Ryan and Pitman in question. [29]

    Monsoon climate theory [Edit]

    The geoscientists Helge Arz and Frank Lammy by the DFG Research Center Ocean Margins studied marine sediments from the northern Red Sea and found in 2003 that the now very dry region even thousands of years ago by a long wet period - a monsoon-like weather system -. Was characterized [30] the researchers found that the surface waters of the Red Sea in the period between about 7000 to 4500 BC had a significantly lower salt content than at present. A monsoon-like climate was the result, similar to the climate of the Indian Ocean, which until about 5000 bc weather events in the Middle East dominated. Studies of pollen and cave deposits hardened the Israeli-monsoon scenario.
    That certainly would have made it seem like the entire world was flooded.
    I like to rock n' roll all night and *part* of every day. I usually have errands... I can only rock from like 1-3.

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    At least half of these Christian scientists are NT:

    Name Image Reason for inclusion
    Bartholomaeus Pitiscus (1561–1613) He may have introduced the word trigonometry into English and French. He was also a Calvinist theologian who acted as court preacher at the town then called Breslau, hence the image of their town square.[40]
    John Napier (1550–1617) Scottish mathematician known for inventing logarithms, Napier's bones, and being the popularizer of the use of decimals. He also was a staunch Protestant who wrote on the Book of Revelation.[41]
    Johannes Kepler (1571–1630) His model of the cosmos based on nesting Platonic solids was explicitly driven by religious ideas; his later and most famous scientific contribution, the Kepler's laws of planetary motion, was based on empirical data that he obtained from Tycho Brahe's meticulous astronomical observations, after Tycho died of mercury poisoning. He had wanted to be a theologian at one time and his Harmonice Mundi discusses Christ at points.[42]
    Galileo Galilei (1564–1642) Scientist who had many problems with the Inquisition for defending heliocentrism in the convoluted period brought about by the Reformation and Counter-Reformation. In regard to Scripture, he took Augustine's position: not to take every passage too literally, particularly when the scripture in question is a book of poetry and songs, not a book of instructions or history.[43]
    Laurentius Gothus (1565–1646) A professor of astronomy and Archbishop of Uppsala. He wrote on astronomy and theology.[44]
    Marin Mersenne (1588–1648) For four years he devoted himself to theology writing Quaestiones celeberrimae in Genesim (1623) and L'Impieté des déistes (1624). These were theological essays against atheism and deism. He is more remembered for the work he did corresponding with mathematicians and concerning Mersenne primes.[45]
    René Descartes (1596–1650) He was a key thinker of the Scientific Revolution. He is also honoured by having the Cartesian coordinate system used in plane geometry and algebra named after him. He did important work on invariants and geometry. His Meditations on First Philosophy partially concerns theology and he was devoted to reconciling his ideas with the dogmas of Catholic Faith to which he was loyal.[note 4][46]
    Pierre Gassendi (1592–1655) Catholic priest who tried to reconcile Atomism with Christianity. He also published the first work on the Transit of Mercury and corrected the geographical coordinates of the Mediterranean Sea.[47]
    Anton Maria of Rheita (1597–1660) Capuchin astronomer. He dedicated one of his astronomy books to Jesus Christ, a "theo-astronomy" work was dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary, and he wondered if beings on other planets were "cursed by original sin like humans are."[48]
    Blaise Pascal (1623–1662) Jansenist thinker;[note 5] well known for Pascal's law (physics), Pascal's theorem (math), and Pascal's Wager (theology).[49]
    Isaac Barrow (1630–1677) English divine, scientist, and mathematician. He wrote Expositions of the Creed, The Lord's Prayer, Decalogue, and Sacraments and Lectiones Opticae et Geometricae.[50]
    Juan Lobkowitz (1606–1682) Cistercian monk who did work on Combinatorics and published astronomy tables at age 10. He also did works of theology and sermons.[51]
    Nicolas Steno (1638–1686) Lutheran convert to Catholicism, his beatification in that faith occurred in 1987. As a scientist he is considered a pioneer in both anatomy and geology, but largely abandoned science after his religious conversion.[52]
    Seth Ward (1617–1689) Anglican Bishop of Salisbury and Savilian Chair of Astronomy from 1649–1661. He wrote Ismaelis Bullialdi astro-nomiae philolaicae fundamenta inquisitio brevis and Astronomia geometrica. He also had a theological/philosophical dispute with Thomas Hobbes and as a bishop was severe toward nonconformists.[53]
    Robert Boyle (1627–1691) Scientist and theologian who argued that the study of science could improve glorification of God.[54]

    [edit] 1701–1800 (18th century)The 18th century is considered the zenith of the Enlightenment. It was not a single movement or school of thought, it was less a set of ideas than it was a set of values. At its core was a critical questioning of traditional institutions, customs, and morals, and a strong belief in rationality and science. The end of the century saw the French Revolution which led to the first major de-Christianization attempts in Europe to occur in many centuries. This culminated in the Cult of the Supreme Being. The period thus saw Christianity in transition and eventually conflict.

    Name Image Reason for inclusion
    John Wallis (1616–1703) As a mathematician he wrote Arithmetica Infinitorumis, introduced the term Continued fraction, worked on cryptography, helped develop calculus, and is further known for the Wallis product. He also devised a system for teaching the non-speaking deaf. He was also a Calvinist inclined chaplain who was active in theological debate.[55]
    John Ray (1627–1705) English botanist who wrote The Wisdom of God manifested in the Works of the Creation. (1691) The John Ray Initiative of Environment and Christianity is also named for him.[56]
    Gottfried Leibniz (1646–1716) Polymath who worked on determinants, a calculating machine, He was a Lutheran who worked with convert to Catholicism John Frederick, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg in hopes of a reunification between Catholicism and Lutheranism. He also wrote Vindication of the Justice of God.[57]
    Isaac Newton (1643–1727) He is regarded as one of the greatest scientists and mathematicians in history. Newton's study of the Bible and of the early Church Fathers were among his greatest passions, though he consistently refused to swear his allegiance to the church. He wrote Observations upon the Prophecies of Daniel and the Apocalypse of St. John (Nontrinitarianism).[58]
    Colin Maclaurin (1698–1746) Proposed to explain Newton's differential calculus using infinite series instead of Newton's fluxions. A Divinity student, he had a Christian institute named for him.[59]
    Stephen Hales (1677–1761) A Copley Medal winning scientist significant to the study of plant physiology. As an inventor designed a type of ventilation system, a means to distill sea-water, ways to preserve meat, etc. In religion he was an Anglican curate who worked with the Society for the Promotion of Christian Knowledge and for a group working to convert black slaves in the West Indies.[60]
    Thomas Bayes (1701–1761) Presbyterian minister who wrote Divine Benevolence, or an Attempt to Prove That the Principal End of the Divine Providence and Government is the Happiness of His Creatures. He is better known for Bayes' theorem and was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1742. [61]
    Firmin Abauzit (1679–1767) A physicist and theologian. He translated the New Testament into French and corrected an error in Newton's Principia.[62]
    Emanuel Swedenborg (1688–1772) His writing is the basis of Swedenborgianism and several of his theological works contained some science hypotheses, most notably the Nebular hypothesis for the origin of the Solar System.[63]
    Carolus Linnaeus (1707–1778) He is known as the "father of modern taxonomy" and also made contributions to ecology. Natural theology and the Bible were important to his Systema Naturae and Systema Vegetabilium.'[64]
    Leonhard Euler (1707–1783) A significant mathematician and physicist, see List of topics named after Leonhard Euler. He wrote Defense of the Divine Revelation against the Objections of the Freethinkers and is also commemorated by the Lutheran Church on their Calendar of Saints on May 24.[65]
    Maria Gaetana Agnesi (1718–1799) Mathematician appointed to a position by Pope Benedict XIV. After her father died she devoted her life to religious studies, charity, and ultimately became a nun.[66]

    [edit] 1801–1900 (19th century)This period led Christians in science to face changes and increased challenges. It was the 19th century that brought the professionalization of the scientific enterprise. By then, religious thinkers who expressed themselves on scientific subjects were increasingly treated as "trespassers". This was also the first century that saw actual discussions of the "relationship between science and religion". In previous ages there was occasional concern about tension between faith and reason, but religion and science were not presented as two opposing forces. This ethos gave birth to the conflict thesis. At the end of the century it was common the view that science and religion "had been in a state of constant conflict". This notion is still very popular, although it is not endorsed by current research on the history of science.[67]

    Name Image Reason for inclusion
    Joseph Priestley (1733–1804) Nontrinitarianism clergyman who wrote the controversial work History of the Corruptions of Christianity. He is credited with discovering oxygen, although Carl Wilhelm Scheele did so a year earlier.[68]
    Isaac Milner (1750–1820) Lucasian Professor of Mathematics known for work on an important process to fabricate Nitrous acid. He was also an evangelical Anglican who co-wrote Ecclesiastical History of the Church of Christ with his brother and played a role in the religious awakening of William Wilberforce. He also led to William Frend being expelled from Cambridge for a purported attack by Frend on religion.[69]
    Samuel Vince (1749–1821) Cambridge astronomer and clergyman. He wrote Observations on the Theory of the Motion and Resistance of Fluids and The credibility of Christianity vindicated, in answer to Mr. Hume’s objections. He won the Copley Medal in 1780, before the period dealt with here ended.[70]
    Olinthus Gregory (1774–1841) He wrote Lessons Astronomical and Philosophical in 1793 and became mathematical master at the Royal Military Academy in 1802. An abridgment of his 1815 Letters on the Evidences of Christianity was done by the Religious Tract Society.[71]
    William Buckland (1784–1856) Anglican priest/geologist who wrote Vindiciae Geologiae; or the Connexion of Geology with Religion explained. He was born in 1784, but his scientific life did not begin before the period discussed herein.[72]
    Augustin Louis Cauchy (1789–1857) Mathematician who defended the Society of Jesus, tried to convert other mathematicians to Catholicism, and was a member of the Society of Saint Vincent de Paul.[73]
    Lars Levi Læstadius (1800–1861) Botanist who started a revival movement within Lutheranism called Laestadianism. This movement is among the strictest forms of Lutheranism. As a botanist he has the author citation Laest and discovered four species.[74]
    Edward Hitchcock (1793–1864) Geologist, paleontologist, and Congregationalist pastor. He worked on Natural theology and wrote on fossilized tracks.[75]
    William Whewell (1794–1866) A professor of mineralogy and moral philosophy. He wrote An Elementary Treatise on Mechanics in 1819 and Astronomy and General Physics considered with reference to Natural Theology in 1833.[76]
    Michael Faraday (1791–1867) A Glasite church elder for a time, he discussed the relationship of science to religion in a lecture opposing Spiritualism.[77]
    Charles Babbage (1791–1871) The Difference Engine and the Ninth Bridgewater Treatise.[78]
    Adam Sedgwick (1785–1873) Anglican priest and geologist whose, A Discourse on the Studies of the University discusses the relationship of God and man. In science he won both the Copley Medal and the Wollaston Medal.[79]
    Temple Chevallier (1794–1873) Priest and astronomer who did Of the proofs of the divine power and wisdom derived from the study of astronomy. He also founded the Durham University Observatory, hence the Durham Shield is pictured.[80]
    John Bachman (1790–1874) Wrote numerous scientific articles and named several species of animals. He also was a founder of the Lutheran Theological Southern Seminary and wrote works on Lutheranism.[81]
    Robert Main (1808–1878) Anglican priest who won the Gold Medal of the Royal Astronomical Society in 1858. (The image is of Asaph Hall's 1879 Gold Medal of the RAS.) Robert Main also preached at the British Association of Bristol.[82]
    James Clerk Maxwell (1831–1879) Although Clerk as a boy was taken to Presbyterian services by his father and to Anglican services by his aunt, while still a young student at Cambridge he underwent an Evangelical conversion that he described as having given him a new perception of the Love of God.[note 6] Maxwell's evangelicalism "committed him to an anti-positivist position."[83][84]
    Arnold Henry Guyot (1807–1884) Swiss-American geologist who did noteworthy work on glaciers, Guyot Glacier is named for him. He also wrote Creation, or the Biblical Cosmogony in the Light of Modern Science.[85]
    Gregor Mendel (1822–1884) Augustinian Abbot who was the "father of modern genetics" for his study of the inheritance of traits in pea plants.[86]
    Philip Henry Gosse (1810–1888) Marine biologist who wrote Aquarium (1854), and A Manual of Marine Zoology (1855–56). He is more famous, or infamous, as a Christian Fundamentalist who coined the idea of Omphalos (theology).[87]
    Asa Gray (1810–1888) His Gray's Manual remains a pivotal work in botany. His Darwiniana has sections titled "Natural selection not inconsistent with Natural theology", "Evolution and theology", and "Evolutionary teleology." The preface indicates his adherence to the Nicene Creed in concerning these religious issues.[88]
    Francesco Faà di Bruno (1825—1888) Italian mathematician most linked to Turin. He is known for Faà di Bruno's formula and being a spiritual writer beatified in 1988.[89]
    Julian Tenison Woods (1832–1889) Co-founder of the Sisters of St Joseph of the Sacred Heart who won a Clarke Medal shortly before death. A picture from Waverley Cemetery, where he's buried, is shown.[90]
    James Dwight Dana (1813–1895) A geologist, mineralogist, and zoologist. He received the Copley Medal, Wollaston Medal, and the Clarke Medal. He also wrote a book titled Science and the Bible and his faith has been described as "both orthodox and intense."[91]
    Louis Pasteur (1822–1895) Inventor of the pasteurization method, a French chemist and microbiologist. He also solved the mysteries of rabies, anthrax, chicken cholera, and silkworm diseases, and contributed to the development of the first vaccines.[92]
    George Jackson Mivart (1827–1900) Fellow of the Zoological Society of London who did notable work on Insectivora and became involved in controversies with Charles Darwin. He was also a convert to Catholicism who taught at the Catholic University of Leuven and received a Doctor of Philosophy from Pope Pius IX in 1876, However his later works were considered unorthodox and led to his excommunication by Cardinal Vaughan.[93]
    Armand David (1826–1900)

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    By SolitaryWalker in forum The NT Rationale (ENTP, INTP, ENTJ, INTJ)
    Replies: 49
    Last Post: 06-07-2007, 11:23 AM

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