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  1. #31
    Wonderer Samuel De Mazarin's Avatar
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    Must... settle... down...

    finishing a liberal arts B.A.... but am trying to build up my sciences to a point where I could technically apply to grad school in either linguistics, philosophy, physics, or neuroscience.

    I think my best bet is to be a professor and write books. If I hit it big with books and make money, I'm going to Brazil and having loads of the shtickity. Otherwise, I guess I'll just enjoy the fact that as a professor, I get to interact with hundreds of smart people... students, teachers... artists... writers... scientists... one or two politicians here and there, but not really...
    Madman's azure lie: a zen miasma ruled.

    Realize us, Madman!

    I razed a slum, Amen.

    ...............................................

  2. #32
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    As an entrepreneur ENTP I can say that the stereotype about their being natural business people is very true! I love that as a business owner I can take on many different roles, depending on how I feel that day--writer, marketer, salesperson, web designer, consultant, educator etc. If I get tired of doing one thing I just leave it for a bit and work on something else.

    You can incorporate your other interests into entrepreneurship as well. Since writing is an interest for you, you might look for a business where you can incorporate some writing--maybe one where you get the word out about your product or company with articles and publications. As an example, I have a MBTI consulting business but spend a lot of time writing about type for internet publications. Businesspeople who make themselves experts by writing about their business area generally command higher respect in their field.

    I also considered becoming a doctor but realized that, like you, one of my main criteria was not getting stuck within a system, and doctors are absolutely stuck and constrained by the health care system. Lawyers too have to work within a tight web of regulations. Another major downside to both those careers is that after training for so many years, you can't really change careers midlife. I think for many ENTPs, no career is lifelong. We get bored quickly and want move on to new challenges, so a career with a ton of startup cost and time is maybe not the best choice.

  3. #33
    Senior Member Fiver's Avatar
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    I am an ENTP in my mid-forties and can add some perspective. I started out as a CPA; I loved studying accounting because it seemed like fun puzzle solving. The actual career is very repetitive. I slugged through for six years. What a waste.

    Run away as fast as you can from careers like medicine, law and accounting which, believe it or not, are 95% routine. A cardiologist friend once told me that 98% of his work life was routine -- only 2% of his time must he innovate using everything he has ever learned or experienced. That is not the life for an ENTP.

    Personally, I love marketing because it allows me to use my process skills and my creativity. My next job, I would love to be a marketing consultant and flit from gig to gig.

    I love being the president of an organization; it gives me a meaningful way to be involved in everything the organization does at a very high level -- no tedium. I always make sure I have "implementers" and "empathic" members on my team to help me in those weak or blind spots. I love working with people -- but in visioning, creative ways. I may not have great people -to-people skills -- but I am able to easily see the patterns of who will do what when, how they will react.

    I agree with the person who wrote that owning your own business allows you to play a different role every day. A business degree can be a great, but maybe not necessary, foundation.

    The most important thing I would tell an ENTPer is don't ingnore your need to be creative and innovative. Don't underestimate your desire to be autonomous or experience frequent radical change. You don't need to limit yourself to obvious career choices.

    Here's what I would do, if I could do it all over:

    Beginning as early as college (if not high school), pick a few areas of intense interest, like say, photography, French food, high-school math teaching techniques, whatever.

    Plan to spend a year (or two or three) diving as deep and wide into each one as you can. Let yourself completely obsess. Actually work in this area if you can. If not, volunteer or work for free in your spare time; you will love the flexibility of volunteering.

    A great first job is a sales job with a quota. You may not want to be in sales, but it will give you training you will be glad you have -- especially if you end up with your own business. The sales training will come in handy no matter what.

    At the end of 5 to 8 years, apply your visioning skills (seriously, you have them and not every one does) to what you can do with this truly unique background that you have been building. Think of ways you can leverage your varied, but deep experiences into your own business or consulting gigs. Keep in mind that you are great with systems and can see processes and patterns where others cannot. Just like Steve Jobs said in his address, "Connect the dots" of your own life. If you do the above, you will have some pretty interesting dots to connect.

    It's a good idea to begin working now toward leading your own business; you will love the flexibility and the autonomy and you can motivate and inspire other people easily.

  4. #34
    Senior Member substitute's Avatar
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    Absolutely Fiver. And also, don't talk yourself into settling down just because other people say you should. Perfectly healthy adventurousness and curiosity are often put down as unhealthy restlessness; the two are not the same thing. If you have the first one, don't let others persuade you to repress it on the basis that they think it's the second.

    I've learned that trying to force myself to settle down means that I just end up sticking with something purely to try to prove people wrong about me being restless or unable to stick at things - even when this thing is harmful to my psyche and there's no logical reason to continue with it. It causes me to end up putting up with a feeling of repressedness and boredom that causes me to actually BECOME restless, so that I eventually just can't take it any more end end up just having to break the fuck out and just create total upheaval to just GET OUT OF HERE!!

    I've learned to embrace my need for changes of scene, for adventure and changes of direction, for refreshment and renewal. And that these things are perfectly valid parts of my personality that are not problems or flaws, but only become seen as problems when I'm forced into a situation where they're not able to be expressed. I do not have problems with commitment and I am not a person who wants to run away from their problems. When I explore it's not escapism.

    Therefore, I've learned to make sure that whatever I do, whatever job I'm engaged in, either the job itself must contain the possibility to discover new things, new places, or it must leave me with enough leisure time and resources to do so in my spare time. It doesn't mean you have to run off to different countries and blow off your responsibilities. I've lived in the same town for 10 years now (a personal best lol), but the way that I can stay sane with all this sameness is by having a) different groups of people to socialize with, in different scences, b) going out to explore randomly a lot, from long distance vacations to driving to a village I've just spotted on the local map and just rambling around it, checking everything out and talking to the people I find. And then after I've done that, I come back home. And c) my work has always entailed a high level of unpredictability and, when I'm there, high pressure. And it's always been something I've believed in, something I'm passionate about.

    Working in the charity/humanitarian sector satisfies all three needs: making a difference/improving the world; variety and challenges that require creative thinking; frontlining it, getting my hands dirty (being there amongst the people). It also often entails travel to different areas and frequently working with new teams, different people.

    Your need for adventure, challenge and new scenes is an integral part of your personality and is valid, valid, valid. Don't ever let anyone persuade you otherwise, or you'll end up committed to a lifestyle that kills who you are slowly from the inside.
    Ils se d�merdent, les mecs: trop bon, trop con..................................MY BLOG!

    "When it all comes down to dust
    I will kill you if I must
    I will help you if I can" - Leonard Cohen

  5. #35
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    The career of "eccentric musician" worked well for Trent Reznor.

  6. #36
    Senior Member Fiver's Avatar
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    Thanks, Substitute. You're right. I find that as an ENTP I am perfect for jobs which end or that you must turn over to someone else. I can be so intensely involved in a project or job and then easily hand off my "baby" to someone else. That is a natural ability that many people don't have. Some people really struggle, for example, after a promotion wiht not being able to let go.

  7. #37
    Senior Member Kora's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Flak View Post
    The career of "eccentric musician" worked well for Trent Reznor.
    Oh boy.
    5w4 - Idiosyncratic/Leisurely/Dramatic
    It's the devil's way now.

  8. #38
    Senior Member substitute's Avatar
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    Actually, my brother (ENFP) has described the Ne primary condition like this: it's like being bisexual. You have the capacity to be attracted to both males and females. If you settle down with one person, you are effectively denying expression and life to the other half of your sexuality. The part of you that is attracted to the other gender, who can have relationships with them, must remain repressed. And yet if you don't settle down, then neither of the sides of you are going to be fulfilled. Whatever you do, you remain unfulfilled, because the world says to you "pick one!"

    Being Ne primary means you're fascinated by pretty much everything. And you're also usually, potentially good at everything too. If you settle in one thing, you deny life to all the other parts of your potential. Whatever you do, the parts of you that could be doing something else and pwning it just as much, are being denied expression. Because so much time and resources are necessary to work your way to success in any one career, effectively the world's saying to you, "Pick one!"

    But you just can't.

    Ils se d�merdent, les mecs: trop bon, trop con..................................MY BLOG!

    "When it all comes down to dust
    I will kill you if I must
    I will help you if I can" - Leonard Cohen

  9. #39
    Senior Member Kora's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by substitute View Post
    Actually, my brother (ENFP) has described the Ne primary condition like this: it's like being bisexual. You have the capacity to be attracted to both males and females. If you settle down with one person, you are effectively denying expression and life to the other half of your sexuality. The part of you that is attracted to the other gender, who can have relationships with them, must remain repressed. And yet if you don't settle down, then neither of the sides of you are going to be fulfilled. Whatever you do, you remain unfulfilled, because the world says to you "pick one!"

    Being Ne primary means you're fascinated by pretty much everything. And you're also usually, potentially good at everything too. If you settle in one thing, you deny life to all the other parts of your potential. Whatever you do, the parts of you that could be doing something else and pwning it just as much, are being denied expression. Because so much time and resources are necessary to work your way to success in any one career, effectively the world's saying to you, "Pick one!"

    But you just can't.

    Lol that was precisely why I thought I could be an Ne primary user.
    And the only ENTP that I know is bisexual, curiously.
    5w4 - Idiosyncratic/Leisurely/Dramatic
    It's the devil's way now.

  10. #40
    Senior Member Nonsensical's Avatar
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    Seems like all of my ENTP friends, which makes up a lot of them, seem to be very very liberal activists..and most are going, or in, literature, art, or science.
    Is it that by its indefiniteness it shadows forth the heartless voids and immensities of the universe, and thus stabs us from behind with the thought of annihilation, when beholding the white depths of the milky way?

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