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Thread: ADHD-PI

  1. #11
    Senior Member Moiety's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Metamorphosis View Post
    Looks like complete bullshit to me.

    Procrastination, forgetfulness, distractability, losing items, difficulty completing chores, and failure to follow instructions....

    Oh my god! Every child has this disorder!
    Every child?

    Quote Originally Posted by YourLocalJesus View Post
    Yeah...
    I think of them as character flaws that can be removed if there's enough will to do it.
    It's generally a part of growing up.
    Fastidiousness and tunnel vision and overall Jness aren't character flaws though right?

  2. #12
    "Everything in its place" fill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ReflecttcelfeR View Post
    ADHD seems to be a psychological explanation of why you aren't efficient enough in the society that you are working in, not so much an actual 'D' disorder.
    Yeah, I've had this thought as well. There have been moments where I've gotten in trouble at work because of my failure to pay attention to what's going on, and a few of those moments I haven't been able to control or am not aware of what I'm doing. What's peculiar about this is that it's been getting worse over the past few months and was not that prevalent in my childhood.

    Maybe a psychologist would help more than medication if this began getting worse.
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  3. #13
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    Maybe it's not you that's the problem, but the job.

  4. #14
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    Lol! You can always tell an ADHD person by the state of their bedroom... sometimes things are kept tidy to minimize distractions, but when they are working hard on a project, or they have been studying something with intensity, they're often like "Wow look at my room" when they're done, it's not uncommon to do the rest of the household chores first so that there is more time available for things they want to do, but the second they get in their room the first thing they want to do is flip open the book, turn on the computer, or whatever it is they are in the middle of. ADD without the HD seems
    to have the most difficulty following through on chores, often things are left to continue
    piling up until they finally can't stand it anymore or they request a friend to remind them

    ENTJ

  5. #15
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    shamelessly repost from the other ADHD thread...

    I had a psychiatric assessment again today that concluded that I have AD/HD and will be confirmed by my reaction to medication. I haven't had it yet, but I'm fairly certain there will be no surprises as I've consumed excessive amounts of caffeine as a child and growing up and know that it helps me relax

    I didn't want to jump to conclusions. Actually, I've found a great challenge in every day of my life which I never thought of as terribly abnormal since it's all I ever knew. Up until now I always felt an usual type of challenge that I could never place but I wanted to overcome it on my own. Only now at 23 was I open to getting checked for a problem.

    Because it was never diagnosed, I developed a huge amount of cognitive coping mechanisms and so reading some opinions on AD/HD I find there is some serious misunderstanding about it.

    First off, AD/HD is a cognitive disorder, not a disease. It's a malfunction of the brain which disables a person's ability to ignore anything from external stimulation or the internal conscious thought patterns. So while a normal person can fairly easily learn to control their focus, the AD/HD person experiences their focus being pulled in every direction and is not able to prevent it. While a normal person can behave in respect to healthy inhibitions, the AD/HD person is presented all sorts of ideas that effect behavior and decisions and so inevitably ignores social norms, acts impulsively, or even responds to every idea leading to hyperactivity.

    For people who have occasional or even recurrent inability to complete a task or focus, this is not necessarily AD/HD. This is possibly the biggest misunderstanding about AD/HD--it is not a mood or behavior problem, it is a cognitive malfunction (brain hardwiring) which unavoidably effects behavior. kids who perform poorly in school, misbehave, or really exhibit any of the symptoms do not necessarily have AD/HD. the ones who dont need to be disciplined, the ones who do need medical treatment. Real AD/HD sufferers experience the symptoms perpetually 24/7 and they are not able to control it or stop it.

    Behaviorally, this can have a number of effects, but I can only speak for myself. For me, it caused an extreme dislike of anything that involved unmanageable amounts of stimulation. Things like commercials on TV or the radio can actually make me really mad because they often repeat things. I never know if I'm really an introvert or just an extrovert who can't process any more than 1 person talking. I know other people would say the same things, but I assure you there is a real, distinctive difference between the typical low human attention span and the need to give deliberate, active effort to keeping something in your head for more than half a second because it's being bombarded by 20 more things the next second.

    There is also a difference between ambition and an inability to get the brain to rest. In my case, I never had school or work performance issues, in fact I did very well. But I am stuck in high-drive mode 24/7. Eventually, I will crash from sheer mental exhausting and become unresponsive for a while. I would compare AD/HD to driving a car with a gas pedal that sticks and no breaks. After crashing into enough things you are left with the choice of either keep making an unmanageable amount of mistakes (hyperactivity, impulsiveness) or pulling the e-brake making your car useless (attention deficit). The way I coped was approaching everything with a shotgun approach that I was eventually able to mature into what you could call "principle driven chaos" that minimized mistakes, and then isolating myself whenever necessary to activities where I could limit the amount of stimulation I was receiving.



    I'm not sure how I feel about the over-diagnosis. I'm a bit irked because my first primary care doctor didn't "buy" that I had AD/HD due to not fitting the stereotype (I was able to perform well in school/work despite the extreme toll it took in stress levels). IMO this is the problem with psychiatry is diagnoses by a condition's profile rather than understanding the malfunction itself so that diagnosis is either true/false. Also, I don't appreciate people saying that those with AD/HD should just "learn to get over it". I developed a lot of coping mechanisms but I still look forward to treatment because honestly battling an every day challenge that borders on feeling insane gets really old. That's why it's called a disorder, those who have it are not able to turn it off or make it go away. Maybe you should walk around for a few months with an inability to ignore any stimulation or thought 24/7 and see how well you cope, let alone function.

    there are also a lot of other bs I have to deal with that isnt part of the disorder, like people calling me impatient when I've been quietly trying to rewire my brain so it doesn't overrespond since I was a little kid. Try working through a problem for a decade without giving up and we'll see who's more patient and hopeful. and to people asking about whether treatment options are worth the loss in "creativity", I would seriously question whether someone who chooses not to get treatment really had the disorder in the first place, because that's a no brainer for anyone who deals with this challenge 24/7. if you dont have it, then you dont know how much it challenges you in just about every way... you wouldnt scrutinize someone who's missing a leg for not being able to get around, would you?

    /jaded

  6. #16
    Per Ardua Metamorphosis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Southern Kross View Post
    This is a common argument but it fails to grasp the issue. The point is that everyone does have these problems to some degree but for people with ADD it is out of control. I think its safe to say all psychological disorders exist merely at the extreme end of a scale in which there is a normal and abnormal range. For example, everyone has weird obsessive things they do (for me, when walking down the footpath I go to great lengths to avoid step on the cracks ) but not everyone has OCD. Everyone has different degrees of the symptoms but not necessarily enough or to a level of severity to fit the diagnosis. It is a disorder is when the symptoms are pervasive and impairing in that person's life.

    I can agree with that. But that doesn't appear to be how attention deficit disorders are normally diagnosed. Most of the people I know who supposedly have it operate like normal people even without medication and I have yet to meet -anyone- that hasn't benefited (in the work/school sense) from stimulants like Adderall.

    The problem with disorders like this is that they don't reflect actual problems with a person so much as they reflect society's opinion of that person. I can't throw a rock without hitting two people with ADD but there are far, far less complaints about people who are less socially or creatively adept.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sytpg View Post
    Every child?
    Noting your italics, the symptoms that I posted were specifically related to children. But yes, I do think it's equally ridiculous for adults.
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  7. #17
    Away with the fairies Southern Kross's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Metamorphosis View Post
    I can agree with that. But that doesn't appear to be how attention deficit disorders are normally diagnosed. Most of the people I know who supposedly have it operate like normal people even without medication and I have yet to meet -anyone- that hasn't benefited (in the work/school sense) from stimulants like Adderall.

    The problem with disorders like this is that they don't reflect actual problems with a person so much as they reflect society's opinion of that person. I can't throw a rock without hitting two people with ADD but there are far, far less complaints about people who are less socially or creatively adept.
    Oh, it is certainly overdiagnosed and these days too many people are quick to blame everything that goes wrong in their life on a fad disorder . I certainly understand your frustration. But remember, the problem with ADD can be that other people don't often see they extent of the struggle the person is going through. They can seem fine but really often they are going through hell.

    The interesting thing about the medication, a recent study proved it ONLY works on people with ADD - to the point it is a good way to confirm someone has ADD (although, not everyone with ADD responds to every medication). Anyone else (ie neuro-typicals) who takes it and feels an improvement is merely experiencing a placebo effect. However, the study showed that those that DO NOT have ADD but DO actually experience a measurable difference in brain activity are in fact suffering from sleep deprivation. This is because sleep deprivation creates a very similar effect on the brain as ADD does.
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  8. #18
    Senior Member Nescio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Metamorphosis View Post
    Looks like complete bullshit to me.

    Procrastination, forgetfulness, distractability, losing items, difficulty completing chores, and failure to follow instructions....

    Oh my god! Every child has this disorder!
    But not every adult does.
    These aren't symptoms, they're manifestations of one symptom of ADHD.
    And lemee tell you. It sucks, and I don't appreciate it when people mark it as bullshit because inattentive types are the most likely to go undiagnosed because "every child has this disorder."

    Undiagnosed children have significantly higher rates of drug abuse, teen pregnancy, etc, etc...

  9. #19
    Member Cerridwen's Avatar
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    I'm very hesitant in posting in here.

    While I identify with all of the symptoms in that thread, I don't believe I actually have it. I think it's more of the way I was raised and the fact that I'm very, very, very P.

    I DO believe that ADHD-PI is a disorder that many people have, but over the years it seems as if it's been diagnosed to nearly every child on the planet. There's a difference between being just plainly absent-minded, and a person who has ADHD.
    Nothing can become anything if you tilt your head and squint.

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