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  1. #21
    Consulting Detective Mr. Sherlock Holmes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    I'm even having trouble thinking of another INTP director right now -- most INTPs hate using directive skills, and being a movie director means a lot of interaction with other people, and overseeing of processes. You have to really develop a variety of skills most INTPs don't bother with until much later in life, to be a decent director... or know how to hire the right staff.
    I've been pretty interested in directing a few times in the past, and attempted it casually, but you are right, the directive leadership is often painful to endure. It may be mostly because I was working with my brother and sister instead of trained proffesionals, but I ended up being very frustrated trying to manage everything. When it works, though, directing is great fun.

    We're probably more likely to be screenwriters.
    JiNe
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    "When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth."

    "It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts."

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    Oh, you are KIDDING me, right?
    Nope.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    One of Scott's most obvious strengths as a director is that he is "clean" -- he typically doesn't over-indulge in emotionality. (my emphasis)
    Reread what I said: "Ridley Scott... knows just how to pull at the emotional heartstrings."

    There's a big difference between "overindulging in emotionality", and "knowing just how to pull at the emotional heartstrings".

    In fact, I used Ridley Scott as an example here precisely because he doesn't overindulge in emotionality, but indulges in it in just the perfect amount (at least for me).

    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    (Just think about what a movie like Thelma and Louise might have been like in the hands of a more emotive/manipulative director.)
    Haven't seen Thelma and Louise since I was about eight or nine, but I remember having a very strong emotional reaction to it -- per what I said before, if Nolan had directed it, my emotional response probably would have been flat.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    I think Gladiator was the most where I've ever seen him go for emotive... but even then it was mainly through shoving us into Maximus' eyes and showing us the love he had for his family, coupled with the score.
    Gladiator also struck a deep emotional chord in me. In fact, it was the primary film I was thinking of, when I referenced Scott.

    I'm not sure how "shoving us into Maximus' eyes", "showing us the love he had for his family", "the score", or any of the numerous other reasons why I found it emotionally moving, don't count as knowing "just how to pull at the emotional heart strings."

    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    He typically prefers to show, not tell...
    And how does this disqualify him from knowing "just how to pull at the emotional heart strings"?

    Is there something about showing -- not telling -- that precludes properly performed pathos appeals?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    ...and he tends to shy away from musical scores that would manipulate the audience... at least until the last few years (I haven't watched his most recent movies).
    Interesting you say that, cuz some of the more memorable scores I remember are from Ridley Scott films: Blade Runner, Gladiator, Blackhawk Down...

    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    He reminds me a lot of Michael Mann, although Mann is even more severe -- he lets the characters/actors tell the story and doesn't tell you how you're supposed to feel.
    I agree with the comparison, although Mann, is, as you said, "more severe".

    He seems to intentionally create bleak, emotionless, amoral, uncaring worlds in his films (with The Last of the Mohicans as an exception).

    Scott seems to make no such effort.

    In Scott's films, there tends to be a moral, karma-like character to the universe.

    Scott's films are also noticeably better than Mann's.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    Personally, I think they are both ST's.
    This very well could be the case.

    I don't know.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    I guess that's the difference between those who actually make movie and those who critique them on obscure Internet forums... Opinions from us are a dime a dozen, but those guys are doing the work.
    Look, I'm not generally one of those annoying film snobs who complains about each and every little subjective opinion I have about every film I see...

    That just ain't my steez...

    But in his last three films (Batman Begins, The Dark Knight, Inception) Christopher Nolan has revealed to me that he's got some serious flaws in his game, one of them being the inability to create an emotionally engaging film.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    Dare I ask which Batman movies you actually thought were better? (Even the first one by Burton was at best marginal by conventional standards; and the quality certainly did not improve as time passed.)
    I loved the first one.

    Haven't seen it in its entirety for ages, but I did see a few clips from it some months back, and I thought they were phenomenal.

    Even the second one was alright (although, admittedly, not necessarily better than Nolan's two).

    The real masterpiece in the whole non-comic-medium Batman universe, ironically enough, is Batman: The Animated Series, from the early 90s (not the later 90s version, which was still decent, but not as good).

    Batman Beyond wasn't half bad, either.

    ***

    Yes, I'm a child...

  3. #23
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    I do agree that directing has an important role in conveying emotion, but really it is only enhancing what the actors should already be emoting. No amount of great directing and editing can cover the talent within the film. I'd say that The Dark Knight (really The Joker and Commissioner Gordon) had some of the best acting, which complemented greatly with the directive style. Batman and TwoFace (the latter did do better) were alright. Inception's actors and directors didn't mesh that well. It felt sterile.

  4. #24
    Consulting Detective Mr. Sherlock Holmes's Avatar
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    I love the music in Bladerunner. It definitely envokes an emotional reaction. Check out the end!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZTzA_xesrL8

    Like... Tears... in the rain... Time to die... *sob*
    JiNe
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    "It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts."

  5. #25
    Senior Member Nicodemus's Avatar
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    I think Ridley Scott has not made a really good film since 1982, Herr Übermensch.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicodemus View Post
    I think Ridley Scott has not made a really good film since 1982, Herr Übermensch.
    Blade Runner is my favorite, too.

    I'm not sure what other movies you'd put in the category of "really good", but, on its surface, I find what you said a perfectly acceptable statement.

    I don't think Thelma and Louise, G.I. Jane, Gladiator, or Blackhawk Down are really good movies -- I just think they're good movies.
    Last edited by Zarathustra; 10-14-2010 at 01:14 PM.

  7. #27
    Senior Member Nicodemus's Avatar
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    'Alien' is my favorite Scott film.

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