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  1. #41
    Analytical Dreamer Coriolis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paradox fox View Post
    Another question: What are Calculus and Trigonometry for?
    Fun!

    I'd like to think that most NT's are at least not afraid of math. Whatever their skill level, they will tackle a math-related problem as best they can, without being intimidated by it. I have no evidence for this, though; it may just be my wishful thinking.

  2. #42
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    Hate math

    Did advanced English back in school though and always has a way with words/creative writing

  3. #43
    Senior Member InfiniteIntrigue's Avatar
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    I want to say no, but the only NT I know is my best friend and myself. I'm good at math in the sense that I despise it, but have few problems learning it. My best friend is also rather talented at it.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

    "Fools who wear their hearts proudly on their sleeves,
    who cannot control their emotions, who wallow in sad
    memories and allow themselves to be provoked this
    easily -- weak people, in other words -- they stand no chance."
    -Severus Snape

  4. #44
    figsfiggyfigs
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coriolis View Post
    Fun!

    I'd like to think that most NT's are at least not afraid of math. Whatever their skill level, they will tackle a math-related problem as best they can, without being intimidated by it. I have no evidence for this, though; it may just be my wishful thinking.
    Okay on the serious note. I acutally really love trig....and calc... O_O...

  5. #45
    Senior Member htb's Avatar
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    Aptitude tests throughout grade school placed me within the top 95-99th percentiles in mathematical concepts but I usually languished in the 70-80th percentiles in mathematical computation. I failed calculus; I still enjoy algebra.

  6. #46
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    I'm pretty good at math. I could probably get a high B or maybe even A if I really tried, but I don't, because I hate it, and I find it incredibly dull and monotonous.

  7. #47
    Glowy Goopy Goodness The_Liquid_Laser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by King-Of-Despair View Post
    Would that be a nice career though? You'd certainly get a great wage, and many job offers, but the jobs might kill you with numbers, if you know what I mean.
    I'm not suggesting that everyone should be an engineer. However for most careers people will be better off having studied both Composition and Calculus. Both subjects are so useful, that I would recommend anyone take them if they have any interest in the subject at all. (Well Composition is usually required, but it's the most useful of the required courses.)
    My wife and I made a game to teach kids about nutrition. Please try our game and vote for us to win. (Voting period: July 14 - August 14)
    http://www.revoltingvegetables.com

  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by paradox fox View Post
    Are all NTs good at math?
    Rid me of the stereotype.
    At Ts = ?, where Ts is time of snap shot.

    When I was in 5th grade I was a month or more behind on my math homework.
    In high school I failed Algebra the first time I took it, was well on my way to failing geometry then managed to pass the NYS regents exam at the last possible chance to pull my fat out of the fire, then went on to fail trigonometry the following year.

    All that was before I took the ASVAB test as part of enlisting in the Navy.
    The ASVAB managed to `out' me as having math aptitude good enough to qualify for Nuclear power and advanced electronics.

    While in the Navy I did some self study with a few math books and a scientific calculator to get over the trauma of math in high school.
    When I got out of the navy and enrolled at a local community college I had to take a math placement test. I tested out of 2 out 3 of the math courses for the major I had selected, and got a pretty easy A in the course I did take.
    I went on to take calculus, discrete math, and use math professionally while doing computer programming.

    So ... yes I've been/seemed both bad and good `at math' depending on which math and at which instant in time.


    Quote Originally Posted by paradox fox View Post
    Another question: What are Calculus and Trigonometry for?
    For a while.
    The courses and rites-of-passage end eventually. ;-)

    Calculus and Trigonometry are for non-NFs and people who quantify.
    As NFs seem only concerned with `polarity' -- EG `positive and `negative', as applied to emotions, feelings, attitudes, and/or the AFFECTS on others -- and quality it would seem that any field of study dealing with abstractions other than Feeling/emotion or quantification of intensity, magnitude, or value might be pretty much lost on them.

    So, from your vantage point, they are tools for use by those you use as tools to perform tasks facilitated by logical and/or mathematical thinking.
    The folks who design most of your technological toys and tools had to use mathematical relationships to get things to work right for YOU.

    Historically speaking, trigonometry was something folks started doing when they wanted to measure trigons -- think a polyGON with 3 sides -- which represented things of interest in Sensate world, like lengths of property lines when trying to restore property lines after a spring flood.

    A Calculus is a stone.
    If you put stones in a sack they can have a one-to-one correspondence between things of value, like sheep or wives.
    If you put holes in the stones you can bead them together to form an abacus, so you don't get your fingers slapped by some SJ pedant for counting on your fingers.

    Okay ... calculus is handy for reasoning about `things' which change over the course of time.

    Had the Mother and daughter team which created the MBTI known about `the calculus' they may have accounted for instantaneous preferences rather than free-floating, average, or nominal preferences.
    I prefer to write no more at this instant.

  9. #49
    Was E.laur Laurie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gps View Post
    Calculus and Trigonometry are for non-NFs and people who quantify.
    As NFs seem only concerned with `polarity' -- EG `positive and `negative', as applied to emotions, feelings, attitudes, and/or the AFFECTS on others -- and quality it would seem that any field of study dealing with abstractions other than Feeling/emotion or quantification of intensity, magnitude, or value might be pretty much lost on them.
    I hope I read this wrong.

  10. #50
    Senior Member Jaguar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elaur View Post
    I hope I read this wrong.
    I've said it many times, some of the stupidest people in this forum are NTs.
    What an embarrassment.

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