User Tag List

First 12345 Last

Results 21 to 30 of 106

  1. #21
    Senior Member Scott N Denver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    4w5
    Posts
    2,899

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Katsuni View Post
    Not all NT's are good at math, no, but they're more likely to appreciate it for its' purpose.

    Calculus and trig suck though; they are used to draw a curve on a graph. If yeu don't have graph paper, then yeu don't need it. And a computer does the same thing better anyway.

    I loved algebra because it had such useful application all the time... calculus I got bored of and didn't do well in since there was no purpose behind it. Yay waste of my time to learn this crap. Yes, it's complex, but no, it has no value on day to day life. Yeu will NEVER need calculus unless yeu're plotting a curve on a graph, because all it's used for is to define a value which changes in a non-linear, yet still predictable way.

    If yeu're not a physicist, working with maps, or trying to figure out some really complex stuff, it's not useful, and 95% of the world's population will have absolutely zero use for it.

    The only reason they teach it in high school, that I can figure, is to make it so the people who are considering classes related to that in university will realize it sucks and back out early.
    I was gonna have a field day with this, but then I saw the bolded part. There is far more to science and engineering than just physics, but know that calculus, and in particular its extension to differential equations [ordinary, partial, including the non-linear versions of both], lies at the FOUNDATION of science and engineering. As expressed in several textbooks on the subject, ALL major laws of science are written as and expressed as [possibly systems of] partial differential equations.

    I've met plenty of NT's who are weak at math. As one peer told me "many physicists are scared of math, or at least find it pretty dull and want to pass over it as quickly as possible."

  2. #22
    Senior Member Scott N Denver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    4w5
    Posts
    2,899

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BlueGray View Post
    Wait, what? Circles have volume?
    Quote Originally Posted by INTPness View Post
    Ha ha!! Good catch. Area. Volume. Circumference. Radius. Diameter. It's all the same thing. No wonder I'm no longer 99th percentile.
    See, this is when you say "Well, what I *really* meant was higher-dimensional generalizations of circles! Now where is my formula for the hyper-volume of a six-dimensional hyper-sphere???"

    Why six you may ask??? Well because different theories of superstring theory in theoretical physics have 10, 26, or some other number of dimensions, and we already have accounted for 4 of them [spacetime: x,y,z,t for example], 10-4=6, and six rolls off of the tongue better than does 22.

  3. #23

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by William K View Post
    No, no, you're doing it wrong. The right phrase should be "All generalizations are never right"
    Let "All generalizations are never right" be A.
    A is a generalization.
    If A is true, then A, being itself a generalization, is "not right".

    So not all generalizations are never right.

    Jokes and circular reasoning aside, generalizations are (generally) useful in capturing non-random trends with a non-random degree of accuracy. The more distinct the trend, the greater the degree the accuracy, and the more useful the generalization.

    There are few, if any instances where "All X -> Y" in reality. There are almost always exceptions. Again, I say always, because there may, (someday/somewhere/somehow) be an exception to the rule that there will always be an exception. ^_^
    Call me Visa, please!
    visakanv.com
    visaisahero.tumblr.com

  4. #24
    Senior Member INTP's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    MBTI
    intp
    Enneagram
    5w4 sx
    Posts
    7,823

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by paradox fox View Post
    What are Calculus and Trigonometry for?
    no idea about calculus and i think trigonometry has something to do about calculating something about triangles.

  5. #25

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Scott N Denver View Post
    I was gonna have a field day with this, but then I saw the bolded part. There is far more to science and engineering than just physics, but know that calculus, and in particular its extension to differential equations [ordinary, partial, including the non-linear versions of both], lies at the FOUNDATION of science and engineering. As expressed in several textbooks on the subject, ALL major laws of science are written as and expressed as [possibly systems of] partial differential equations.
    Agreed. I'd like to share my personal perspective as well-

    I'm an arts student who enjoys history, philosophy and the like, yet I also have always found mathematics and the sciences really interesting. I did math in junior college and I found it fun and intellectually stimulating. I may never physically have to use calculus or trigonometry in real life, but just having an understanding of it has enriched my experience of this awesome universe.
    Call me Visa, please!
    visakanv.com
    visaisahero.tumblr.com

  6. #26

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by paradox fox View Post
    What are Calculus and Trigonometry for?
    Trigonometry studies the relationships between the sides and angles of triangles.

    It's very useful when measuring distances, like in geography and astronomy and in satellite systems. It also has a lot of implications on light and sound waves.

    Fields that use trigonometry:

    astronomy (essential for locating apparent positions of celestial objects)
    navigation (on the oceans, in aircraft, and in space)
    music theory
    acoustics
    optics
    analysis of financial markets
    electronics
    probability theory
    statistics
    biology
    medical imaging (CAT scans and ultrasound)
    pharmacy
    chemistry
    number theory (and hence cryptology)
    seismology
    meteorology
    oceanography
    many physical sciences
    land surveying and geodesy
    architecture
    phonetics
    economics
    electrical engineering
    mechanical engineering
    civil engineering
    computer graphics
    cartography
    crystallography
    game development.


    Calculus is the study of change, in the same way that geometry is the study of shape and algebra is the study of operations.

    It is very important in studying things like acceleration, which is the rate of change of speed. It has widespread applications in science, economics, and engineering and can solve many problems for which algebra alone is insufficient.

    Calculus is used in every branch of the physical sciences, actuarial science, computer science, statistics, engineering, economics, business, medicine, demography, and in other fields wherever a problem can be mathematically modeled and an optimal solution is desired. It allows one to go from (non-constant) rates of change to the total change or vice versa, and many times in studying a problem we know one and are trying to find the other.
    Call me Visa, please!
    visakanv.com
    visaisahero.tumblr.com

  7. #27
    Was E.laur Laurie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    MBTI
    ENFP
    Enneagram
    7w6
    Socionics
    ENFp
    Posts
    6,075

    Default

    My daughter said this to me last week.

    Laurel: Sooner or later, everything ties back to math, doesn't it.

  8. #28
    figsfiggyfigs
    Guest

    Default

    Death to Math.

  9. #29
    Ruler of the Stars Asterion's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5 sp/sx
    Posts
    2,334

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Katsuni View Post
    Not all NT's are good at math, no, but they're more likely to appreciate it for its' purpose.

    Calculus and trig suck though; they are used to draw a curve on a graph. If yeu don't have graph paper, then yeu don't need it. And a computer does the same thing better anyway.

    I loved algebra because it had such useful application all the time... calculus I got bored of and didn't do well in since there was no purpose behind it. Yay waste of my time to learn this crap. Yes, it's complex, but no, it has no value on day to day life. Yeu will NEVER need calculus unless yeu're plotting a curve on a graph, because all it's used for is to define a value which changes in a non-linear, yet still predictable way.

    If yeu're not a physicist, working with maps, or trying to figure out some really complex stuff, it's not useful, and 95% of the world's population will have absolutely zero use for it.

    The only reason they teach it in high school, that I can figure, is to make it so the people who are considering classes related to that in university will realize it sucks and back out early.
    Calculus is rediculously useful in all areas of science, differential equations are used in chemistry, biology, quantum mechanics, electronics, motion etc. Multivariable Calculus just about defines Electromagnetism and both of these subjects require a decent understanding of Algebra and Calculus. There are pure mathematics majors who are paid a lot of money to solve problems that are too difficult for the typical scientist (who very often have mathematics background just so they can communicate with mathmagicians!), there are also people who have specialized in using computers to work out mathematical problems that are insanely far beyond our human limits.

    So, they may teach those mathematics during high school so that you can at least talk to people in your field who are qualified to handle such things. I mean, hey, when you go buy a computer or a car, you don't blindly walk in and rely on the salesperson, do ya? (okay, a lot of people probably do that...).

    The only thing I don't like about maths, is that it can involve an extreme amount of repeditive calculations (like some I did today in fact), or you'll be given a whole shitload of incomprehensible theorems and terminology and expected to just work out what to do with them (which happens to me every single monday :steam
    5 3 9

  10. #30
    Glowy Goopy Goodness The_Liquid_Laser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Posts
    3,377

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by paradox fox View Post
    Rid me of the stereotype.

    Another question: What are Calculus and Trigonometry for?

    Perhaps I should JFGI. *shrugs*
    The percentage of NTs who are fairly good at math is larger than the percentage of people who are fairly good at math from the population in general. However there are quite a few NTs who are not particularly good at math.

    The two most useful subjects you can study in college are Calculus and Freshman Composition. The first class is the key to unlocking so many fields of knowledge. The second class teaches you to communicate what you know effectively. Any person who has mastered both subjects really has a ton of opportunity ahead of them.
    My wife and I made a game to teach kids about nutrition. Please try our game and vote for us to win. (Voting period: July 14 - August 14)
    http://www.revoltingvegetables.com

Similar Threads

  1. Are You Good at Math?
    By Upnextup in forum Academics and Careers
    Replies: 64
    Last Post: 09-23-2017, 12:23 AM
  2. Are you good at math?
    By Pseudo in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 47
    Last Post: 07-27-2012, 07:49 AM
  3. [NT] NT's Good at Math?
    By Synthetic Darkness in forum The NT Rationale (ENTP, INTP, ENTJ, INTJ)
    Replies: 53
    Last Post: 10-12-2009, 10:47 PM
  4. We are, all of us, at a hypothetical party! :D
    By Nillerz in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 55
    Last Post: 01-17-2009, 01:02 PM
  5. Who is good at math?
    By The Ü™ in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 43
    Last Post: 03-06-2008, 09:50 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO