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  1. #111
    S Saiyan God Mace's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Litvyak View Post
    There is no 'maximum IQ'...
    (Theoretically, this is true.)

    How can you initiate a scientific paradigm shift with 'typical hard work'? It's a purely theoretical concept, a whole new system with new rules. Imagination and out-of-the-box thinking is absolutely necessary here imo.
    ... I just know.

  2. #112
    Senior Member Chloe's Avatar
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    Default Re: What are your IQs?

    My IQs are 1, 13, 26, 32 and 41.

    EDIT:
    Oooops..typo.. no, no, those are winning numbers for tomorrow's lottery!
    fuck!!! totally useless post!

  3. #113
    The Memes Justify the End EcK's Avatar
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    You guys'll be sorry when the overlords come and ignore us to talk to the dolphins instead.
    And then kick our collective ass(that'd be one huge ass) when they find out the way we threat them.
    Expression of the post modern paradox : "For the love of god, religions are so full of shit"

    Theory is always superseded by Fact...
    ... In theory.

    “I’d hate to die twice. It’s so boring.”
    Richard Feynman's last recorded words

    "Great is the human who has not lost his childlike heart."
    Mencius (Meng-Tse), 4th century BCE

  4. #114
    Happy Dancer uumlau's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Imperial View Post
    I actually never thought Einstein was such a smart person, any way - and much of what he'd delivered seemed typical out of sheer hard work, and effort.
    The nature of really good, powerful ideas is that they simplify our understanding at one level, even as they expand our understanding to more complicated levels.

    The real power of Einstein's genius is, in a way, "just luck." He predicted that gravity would bend light, very precisely. Experiment confirmed his result, with the observation of a star during a total eclipse of the sun (not the heart!). One little-told fact is that he was originally off by a factor of two, but corrected it before the experiment was performed.

    He also made some catastrophic mistakes, one such being the cosmological constant. He didn't like the idea of an expanding/contracting universe, and thus made the constant (a valid solution of his equations that may have any value) nonzero in order to hold the universe at a steady size. He almost predicted galactic redshift with equations that would prove to solve most cosmological puzzles, including the eventual discovery of evidence for the big bang.

    Quote Originally Posted by Litvyak View Post
    How can you initiate a scientific paradigm shift with 'typical hard work'? It's a purely theoretical concept, a whole new system with new rules. Imagination and out-of-the-box thinking is absolutely necessary here imo.
    Out of the box thinking is necessary, but entirely insufficient. When you read the literature, his papers don't seem that revolutionary. Rather, he took the existing scientific riddles of his day and solved them using techniques that already existed: Brownian motion proving the molecular theory of matter, Lorentz transformations in relativity had already been used to attempt resolving the concept of luminiferous aether with Newtonian mechanics. In fact, the only thing he did that was truly momentous was that for which he received the Nobel prize for physics: hypothesizing that light is made up of particles of energy, thus explaining the photoelectric effect and laying the groundwork for quantum mechanics. Even here, however, he was preceded by Max Planck, who had used the idea of discrete lumps of energy for light to explain black body radiation.

    Every great discovery in science was predicated upon the work of others: it is ultimately a cooperative enterprise. Even the great Newton confessed to standing upon the shoulders of giants.

    Pretty much all of science is really very boring detail work. The problem isn't coming up with a cool idea; the problem is writing a credible paper about your idea that passes peer review and actually contributes to knowledge. Cool ideas are a dime a dozen, and crackpots abound in physics forums worldwide. Hard work turns a cool idea into Nobel-prize-winning material.
    An argument is two people sharing their ignorance.

    A discussion is two people sharing their understanding, even when they disagree.

  5. #115
    No Cigar Litvyak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by uumlau View Post
    Out of the box thinking is necessary, but entirely insufficient.
    Typical hard work is necessary, but entirely insufficient.
    My thoughts exactly.

  6. #116

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    Quote Originally Posted by goodgrief View Post
    what IQs have you scored?
    OVER NINE THOUSAND!!!

  7. #117
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
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    i'm 116. average, i guess. or slightly above avg if i wanted to reach for straws and be an asshole (to whom, i don't know.. average people apparently do not exist ). years ago, right after highschool, i had a similar score, i think, so it hasn't changed much (i haven't entered college either.. so my lifestyle hasn't changed..). i get high 130s on some of those ghetto online tests. flattering, but ridiculous.

    as for what a person could do with their intelligence, that's a good point. i read that richard feynman was 125.

  8. #118
    Senior Member Forever_Jung's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KDude View Post
    i'm 116. average, i guess. or slightly above avg if i wanted to reach for straws and be an asshole (to whom, i don't know.. average people apparently do not exist ). years ago, right after highschool, i had a similar score, i think, so it hasn't changed much (i haven't entered college either.. so my lifestyle hasn't changed..). i get high 130s on some of those ghetto online tests. flattering, but ridiculous.

    as for what a person could do with their intelligence, that's a good point. i read that richard feynman was 125.
    116 is one whole standard deviation above average (plus 1), so it wouldn't be grasping at straws. I know what you're saying though. This post caught my attention because of the Richard Feynman namedrop. Loved that guy.

  9. #119
    The Memes Justify the End EcK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KDude View Post
    as for what a person could do with their intelligence, that's a good point. i read that richard feynman was 125.
    Yeah, but he had the huge advantage of being an entp

    btw, what are the sources for feynmann.?
    I find that when I dig into it, alot of such data don't have any real basis.
    Expression of the post modern paradox : "For the love of god, religions are so full of shit"

    Theory is always superseded by Fact...
    ... In theory.

    “I’d hate to die twice. It’s so boring.”
    Richard Feynman's last recorded words

    "Great is the human who has not lost his childlike heart."
    Mencius (Meng-Tse), 4th century BCE

  10. #120
    *hmmms* theadoor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by uumlau View Post
    The real power of Einstein's genius is, in a way, "just luck." He predicted that gravity would bend light, very precisely. Experiment confirmed his result, with the observation of a star during a total eclipse of the sun (not the heart!). One little-told fact is that he was originally off by a factor of two, but corrected it before the experiment was performed.
    Out of the box thinking is necessary, but entirely insufficient. When you read the literature, his papers don't seem that revolutionary. Rather, he took the existing scientific riddles of his day and solved them using techniques that already existed:
    Pretty much all of science is really very boring detail work. The problem isn't coming up with a cool idea; the problem is writing a credible paper about your idea that passes peer review and actually contributes to knowledge. Cool ideas are a dime a dozen, and crackpots abound in physics forums worldwide. Hard work turns a cool idea into Nobel-prize-winning material.
    Off topic. All of the above sounds like pure Ne(taking other ideas&developing them) + Ti (systematizing them). Guys how can you call him an INTP?
    Oh yeah?

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