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  1. #11
    Senior Member ObeyBunny's Avatar
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    Default INTJ reaction to trauma

    Quote Originally Posted by Oddly Refined View Post
    Yes. I sustained several different forms of abuse in different time periods. Consequently, My Ni kicks with my Fi (fears) overwhelming it and then I start speculating (J). I know another intj with similar functional issues with a different cause.
    Okay, that makes three INTJs where this exact thing has happened. Maybe this kind of thing (namely having each letter in oneís personality become supper stronger as a result of some trauma) only happens to INTJís

    Does this mean that INTJ's are supremely susceptible to trauma? Or that all the side effects of trauma (i.e. becoming withdrawn, more prone to drifting off into space, less caring towards other's feelings, making extensive plans so that the trauma can never happen again) resemble a personality with off-the-scale I,N,T,J?

    (Sorry that I took so long to reply, I went on vacation)
    Q: "What is the process of seeking the truth?"
    A: "Distilled liquor"

    Q: "If you could live anywhere in the world, where would it be?"
    A: "Between a starving prostitute and a steak sandwich."

    Q:How would a mathematician capture an elephant?
    A:He would build a cage, step inside, and rename his new location as "outside."

  2. #12
    Senior Member ObeyBunny's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThatGirl View Post
    I did not read all of the op. This sounds like Si.
    What is Si? Does that mean I'm not an 'N'?
    Q: "What is the process of seeking the truth?"
    A: "Distilled liquor"

    Q: "If you could live anywhere in the world, where would it be?"
    A: "Between a starving prostitute and a steak sandwich."

    Q:How would a mathematician capture an elephant?
    A:He would build a cage, step inside, and rename his new location as "outside."

  3. #13
    Senior Member ObeyBunny's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trinity View Post
    Anything can affect our personality in positive and negative ways. Childhood trauma in particular.

    This may be of interest: http://www.typologycentral.com/forum...rior-injs.html
    Interesting. I've notice the same in my self at times.
    So far, my observation is thus:
    Regular stress causes people to become their opposites (short term)
    While trauma can cause people excaudate the strength of their original letters.

    I'm curious where one ends and another begins.
    Q: "What is the process of seeking the truth?"
    A: "Distilled liquor"

    Q: "If you could live anywhere in the world, where would it be?"
    A: "Between a starving prostitute and a steak sandwich."

    Q:How would a mathematician capture an elephant?
    A:He would build a cage, step inside, and rename his new location as "outside."

  4. #14
    Filthy Apes! Kalach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ObeyBunny View Post
    Sorry it took so long for me to respond, I was on vacation for about 5 days.
    Did you take the backpack?

    "Trauma" seems like a really big topic, and if it has to be related to typology, I suppose we have either to start classifying types of trauma or start discussing type-characteristic coping mechanisms. And then talk about whether the stress of the trauma is chronic or acute.... Too many variables for an easy discussion.

    Or, to put it another way, that which doesn't kill us makes us stronger or leaves us broken and confused?
    Bellison uncorked a flood of horrible profanity, which, translated, meant, "This is extremely unusual."

    Boy meets Grr

  5. #15
    Senior Member ObeyBunny's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kalach View Post
    Did you take the backpack?
    I brought it, but had a lingering sense of guilt for unpacking it. (It was so neatly packed, I could never get everything back in its place)

    Quote Originally Posted by Kalach View Post
    "Trauma" seems like a really big topic, and if it has to be related to typology, I suppose we have either to start classifying types of trauma or start discussing type-characteristic coping mechanisms. And then talk about whether the stress of the trauma is chronic or acute.... Too many variables for an easy discussion.
    I'm not even sure how to go about researching this kind of thing [dark humor=moderate] (aside from kidnapping dozens of children of all different personality types and subjecting them to different types of trauma.)[/dark humor]

    Not that I would want to...
    ---
    As an unrelated question, what are you doing at Typology Central at 1:30am? You're either up really really early or it's very very past
    Q: "What is the process of seeking the truth?"
    A: "Distilled liquor"

    Q: "If you could live anywhere in the world, where would it be?"
    A: "Between a starving prostitute and a steak sandwich."

    Q:How would a mathematician capture an elephant?
    A:He would build a cage, step inside, and rename his new location as "outside."

  6. #16
    Filthy Apes! Kalach's Avatar
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    Just looking through the MBTI Manual, there's a study that looked at American combat veterans admitted to a Veterans Administration domiciliary who had requested psychotherapy, namely:

    Otis GD & Louks JL (1997). Rebelliousness and psychological distress in a sample of Introverted veterans. Journal of Psychological Type, 40,20-30.

    Apparently, there were type-related differences in likelihood of particular diagnoses. (Sample size=158.) They found, INFP were most likely to have anxiety disorder, INTJs major depression, ISTP combat-related post-traumatic stress disorder. ITPs were most likely to display antisocial and avoidant personality disorders, and ISTJs most likely to be designated obsessive compulsive. IFJs were likely to be characterised as "dramatic".

    So, magnification of type? Seems a bit inappropriate to say so. Maybe something more like: different types have different reactions to stress. But even that seems a bit too global a claim.


    Perhaps for types and traumatic events (as opposed to on-going stress), perhaps something like "Different types learn different lessons from similar situations and go on to develop those lessons in different ways"?

    Too vague, I guess. Plus a bit too mechanistic. Those people units are unruly when one fails to address their inner states.
    Bellison uncorked a flood of horrible profanity, which, translated, meant, "This is extremely unusual."

    Boy meets Grr

  7. #17
    Senior Member ObeyBunny's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kalach View Post
    Just looking through the MBTI Manual, there's a study that looked at American combat veterans admitted to a Veterans Administration domiciliary who had requested psychotherapy, namely:

    Otis GD & Louks JL (1997). Rebelliousness and psychological distress in a sample of Introverted veterans. Journal of Psychological Type, 40,20-30.

    Apparently, there were type-related differences in likelihood of particular diagnoses. (Sample size=158.) They found, INFP were most likely to have anxiety disorder, INTJs major depression, ISTP combat-related post-traumatic stress disorder. ITPs were most likely to display antisocial and avoidant personality disorders, and ISTJs most likely to be designated obsessive compulsive. IFJs were likely to be characterised as "dramatic".

    So, magnification of type? Seems a bit inappropriate to say so. Maybe something more like: different types have different reactions to stress. But even that seems a bit too global a claim.


    Perhaps for types and traumatic events (as opposed to on-going stress), perhaps something like "Different types learn different lessons from similar situations and go on to develop those lessons in different ways"?

    Too vague, I guess. Plus a bit too mechanistic. Those people units are unruly when one fails to address their inner states.
    Highly intriguing, so that means that my reaction was unusual and that most INTJís would have reacted with depression. I wonder why I didn't become depressed?

    Anyway, I suppose my ultra INTJ-ish behavior has little to do with that event I had as a kid. Maybe I would have grown to be as neurotic as I am now regardless.

    Although, the ISTJs who became obsessive compulsive seemed to become stronger SJís (obsessing about little details[S] and organizing them to ungodly perfection [J])

    Hmmm.....
    Q: "What is the process of seeking the truth?"
    A: "Distilled liquor"

    Q: "If you could live anywhere in the world, where would it be?"
    A: "Between a starving prostitute and a steak sandwich."

    Q:How would a mathematician capture an elephant?
    A:He would build a cage, step inside, and rename his new location as "outside."

  8. #18
    Filthy Apes! Kalach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ObeyBunny View Post
    Highly intriguing, so that means that my reaction was unusual and that most INTJís would have reacted with depression. I wonder why I didn't become depressed?
    Depends. Did you take part in any significant combat ops before you were eight?
    Bellison uncorked a flood of horrible profanity, which, translated, meant, "This is extremely unusual."

    Boy meets Grr

  9. #19
    Senior Member ObeyBunny's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kalach View Post
    Depends. Did you take part in any significant combat ops before you were eight?
    (Oops. That's right, this studdy was about returning vets...)
    Q: "What is the process of seeking the truth?"
    A: "Distilled liquor"

    Q: "If you could live anywhere in the world, where would it be?"
    A: "Between a starving prostitute and a steak sandwich."

    Q:How would a mathematician capture an elephant?
    A:He would build a cage, step inside, and rename his new location as "outside."

  10. #20
    Senior Member hilo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kalach View Post
    Just looking through the MBTI Manual, there's a study that looked at American combat veterans admitted to a Veterans Administration domiciliary who had requested psychotherapy, namely:

    Otis GD & Louks JL (1997). Rebelliousness and psychological distress in a sample of Introverted veterans. Journal of Psychological Type, 40,20-30.

    Apparently, there were type-related differences in likelihood of particular diagnoses. (Sample size=158.) They found, INFP were most likely to have anxiety disorder, INTJs major depression, ISTP combat-related post-traumatic stress disorder. ITPs were most likely to display antisocial and avoidant personality disorders, and ISTJs most likely to be designated obsessive compulsive. IFJs were likely to be characterised as "dramatic".

    So, magnification of type? Seems a bit inappropriate to say so. Maybe something more like: different types have different reactions to stress. But even that seems a bit too global a claim.


    Perhaps for types and traumatic events (as opposed to on-going stress), perhaps something like "Different types learn different lessons from similar situations and go on to develop those lessons in different ways"?

    Too vague, I guess. Plus a bit too mechanistic. Those people units are unruly when one fails to address their inner states.
    Antisocial makes sense for INTP. Especially if it manifests not as an active, hateful type of disorder but a passive disregard for humanity. It's something that all INTPs, I suspect, have had to wrestle with at some point. Usually this comes up when there is a conflict with two potential positions: screw everyone else and do whatever it takes to win (using all tactics/smarts available) or to actually come down to the level of a human being and do what is right or ideal in some way without assurance of a good personal outcome. As a younger human I would feel the desire to do both at various times.

    Aside from social alienation, which I hesitate to classify as "traumatic" because it is more of a long-term situational problem, I don't think INTPs are as easily traumatized as INTJ. We're more likely to just sit back and think about things.
    I have come to believe that the whole world is an enigma, a harmless enigma that is made terrible by our own mad attempt to interpret it as though it had an underlying truth.
    - Umberto Eco

    INTP e9 (sx/so/sp)
    Ti = Ne (41.3) > Si (31.2) ~ Ni (31.1) ~ Te (30.1) > Se (24.1) >> Fe (21) & Fi (20.1)

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