User Tag List

First 123 Last

Results 11 to 20 of 23

  1. #11
    That chalkboard guy Matthew_Z's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    MBTI
    xxxx
    Posts
    1,256

    Default

    Details only exist if you notice them. Once you know your focus or general theme of your observation, you know what direction the details should lead in. If the disproportionality of the world is the focus, the the sizes of various objects are what to look for. The details are supposed to "speak." Two approaches are evident from this point: know the details and find what they say, know what they're supposed to say and find the voices that are speaking.

    If you don't even have a vague conception of either, then why did you even decide to start writing about this apparently impossible-to-describe world in the first place? If you have neither, rather than fabricating details, (which are more or less, objectively set) create a message(which is mostly subjective) of any sort and milk it to depletion.
    If a deaf INFP falls in the forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?

  2. #12
    "Everything in its place" fill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    MBTI
    entp
    Enneagram
    753
    Posts
    507

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by the state i am in View Post
    i have the same problem currently. as an Ni dom, how the fuck am i supposed to, rather than synthesizing the ideas i am interested in, focus on "telling a story" as if some pointless anecdote will become meaningful for me. context, context, context, right?

    we have to read all of these isfp spiritual writing books. and everyone seems to adore david sedaris. no thanks.
    Ahaha, you've made my night.

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew_Z View Post
    Details only exist if you notice them. Once you know your focus or general theme of your observation, you know what direction the details should lead in. If the disproportionality of the world is the focus, the the sizes of various objects are what to look for. The details are supposed to "speak." Two approaches are evident from this point: know the details and find what they say, know what they're supposed to say and find the voices that are speaking.
    I find this very interesting. I've not thought this before.

    If you don't even have a vague conception of either, then why did you even decide to start writing about this apparently impossible-to-describe world in the first place? If you have neither, rather than fabricating details, (which are more or less, objectively set) create a message(which is mostly subjective) of any sort and milk it to depletion.
    I believe the world can be described, but I have a very difficult time describing something by strict, "sensing" details. I can create an analogy or relate it to something familiar to the reader- it almost drains me to think and describe every minute detail. What kills me is that I was supposed to "observe" a sub-culture. I did, but I ended up recording things like, "just like other groups or teams that compete..." instead of, "three people sat on the lower rafters, waving their hands that suited gold gloves, while the men sang in unison..." I mean, there, I made something up- but if I'm going straight from my experience, color me screwed.
    "Poor bastard. Wait 'till he sees the bats. "
    enneagram - 7/5/3

  3. #13
    Ruler of the Stars Asterion's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5 sp/sx
    Posts
    2,334

    Default

    Are you sure that the teacher wants sensory details though... and not what you can gather/deduce/speculate from those details? Ne is your prefered function, but it doesn't have to be your best and only hope, you should actually be able to do it without much trouble MBTI wise. But if it's something untrained, naturally you're gonna struggle until you have some experience with it.
    5 3 9

  4. #14
    Writing... Tamske's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Posts
    1,764

    Default

    Ask yourself questions. Expand by the answers.

    Example: my novel starts in a temple. I've given this chapter to a friend for comments. Her reaction?
    "What do those statues of the gods look like? How big are they? Are they made of stone? Are you describing the statues there or are you describing the gods?"
    Just by reading the suggestion that people might think the statues were of stone, I realized I actually had a very detailed image of those statues and I had to write it down if I wanted the people to get the image right!
    They were made of wood, and painted in bright colours, and clothed in fine clothes in bright colours clashing with the paint, and with all sorts of sparkly things sewed unto them until they looked like an overdecorated Christmas tree, and...
    ... and actually they looked exactly like the statues of the saints I've seen in Bolivia five years ago...

    Ask someone else what mental image they get from your description. It will strike you as wrong and you'll realize that actually you know much more details than you've written down.

    You know the details but they aren't important to you. You don't see reason why it would matter whether the statues of the gods were made of stone or of wood. Until someone gets a picture of a very serene temple with simple stone statues while you wanted the temple to be gaudy, sparkly and colourful.

    At least, that's how it works for me. I hope this has been helpful.
    Got questions? Ask an ENTP!
    I'm female. I just can't draw women

  5. #15
    Senior Member sculpting's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    4,226

    Default

    My entp can remember every detail of past convos word by word. It is odd. She is much more verbal memory it seems than me. However she said she cannot remember past sensations. I realized I cannot either.

    However I can imagine future touch-taste-smell sensations and some visual sensations. She can imagine visual-auditory future sensations very well.

    maybe dont try and remember something from the past-instead imagine something?

  6. #16
    Writing... Tamske's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Posts
    1,764

    Default

    I can't recall images directly. However, I'm very good at recalling them indirectly. It seems my Si is filled to the brim with all sorts of images, sounds, tastes, smells and textures... only to get mixed up whenever I'm imagining something.
    I've described an old library in great detail, only to realize afterwards that I've mixed up the books from a real old library, the globes from a museum (adapted to represent the imaginary world), the roof from a theatre, the architecture probably from some lecture hall... Don't ask me how that real old library looked like.
    Got questions? Ask an ENTP!
    I'm female. I just can't draw women

  7. #17
    in-game Gamine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Enneagram
    3w2
    Posts
    815

    Default

    I had to do something similar for a creative writing class I took. It scared the beejeebers out of me. I ended up building a structure to cope with it:

    Step One: Pick a thing
    Step Two: Go through senses in order of imporatance for that thing (sight, sense, taste, touch, sound) and describe them on that level first, like a list
    Step Three: Make some fancy stuff up to fluff it to fill the work requirement
    Step Four: Slip in some jokes or satyrical comments to distract from the bullshit
    Step Five: Drink some more coffee, the paper still isn't long enough! It sounds so touchy-feely too
    Step Six: After spending more time procrastinating, decide to stick with touchy-feely and dry humour because I have other important things to do, like napping or not thinking about the paper
    Step Seven: Get the paper back after a time lapse of 5 times as long as it took me to forget I wrote the paper
    Step Eight: Rejoice! My prof likes my tone and enjoyed the different unique perceptions, takes them seriously (while I was giggling like a looney writing them, tearing up at the ridiculousness of the writing)
    Step Nine: Forget everything again until a thread pops up on TypeC
    "Beware Those Who Are ALWAYS READING BOOKS" - Bukowski

  8. #18
    Senior Member tinkerbell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Posts
    3,487

    Default

    Well I still pick up sensory information, I enjoy smells and sounds and feels - I just don't tend to want to write about them.

    I'd be tempted to cheat a bit, and write what I wanted to write, then go back and lace references to my 5 sences... but I suspect your teacher wants you to think about expereincing the actual moment, in order to provide a richer experience for the reader.

    I don't tent to like reading too much detail when I read either, but I do like a certain amoutn of detail.

    If you want an odd reading experience try a novel form Banana Yoshimoto some of them are pretty odd topics however they read like an orchid

  9. #19
    Geolectric teslashock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Enneagram
    7w6
    Posts
    1,690

    Default

    I know you say that you think your professor doesn't want "fluff" in your descriptive essay, but metaphors and similes are not fluff according to most writers. Incorporating metaphors and similes is a standard method and one of the major ways that we can make writing creative. Metaphors are as cardinal to writing as a spices are to Indian cuisine. Compare x to y, and make x and y be completely different things, but compare them in a way that makes sense and that makes the details and meaning of x even clearer. Any given novel is wrought with metaphors; just open up to a descriptive paragraph and you'll see this.

    Readers don't want you to tell them what a rug feels like or how a sunset looks; any given audience already knows this. Readers want you to describe the physical characteristics on a deeper level, a way that makes them view something differently, or in a way that makes them realize something novel about whatever it is you're describing, and metaphors are a great way of doing this. Metaphors are ketchup for your fries, telescopes for viewing the stars, a colorful scarf to liven up an otherwise plain outfit; they make your writing more personal and your descriptions even more appealing to the senses.

  10. #20
    "Everything in its place" fill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    MBTI
    entp
    Enneagram
    753
    Posts
    507

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by King-Of-Despair View Post
    Are you sure that the teacher wants sensory details though... and not what you can gather/deduce/speculate from those details? Ne is your prefered function, but it doesn't have to be your best and only hope, you should actually be able to do it without much trouble MBTI wise. But if it's something untrained, naturally you're gonna struggle until you have some experience with it.
    Yes, I'm very sure. We read example essays to guide us, and they were mostly comprise of, "I thought this. This happened. I asked this. I was answered this," instead of, "Because of this, I think that this is like this, which can be seen in this." I mean, we can make the essay subjective, but isn't that sort of dishonest- wouldn't I be required to omit certain details for the gain of my own opinion? And if I hardly have any detail, why omit any of it? Such would only make my paper shorter. I think the only way I could be subjective is to rant or praise my subject. ... I may just have to. I hate cheating- I really wish I could be graded for honesty.

    Quote Originally Posted by Happy Puppy View Post
    maybe dont try and remember something from the past-instead imagine something?
    I would love to, but she wants real data.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gamine View Post
    I had to do something similar for a creative writing class I took. It scared the beejeebers out of me. I ended up building a structure to cope with it:
    I really like this. I may follow the steps- maybe modify them a bit, too.

    Quote Originally Posted by tinkerbell View Post
    I'd be tempted to cheat a bit, and write what I wanted to write, then go back and lace references to my 5 sences... but I suspect your teacher wants you to think about expereincing the actual moment, in order to provide a richer experience for the reader.
    Yeah, this is exactly what she wants- unfortunately these moments don't exist.

    Quote Originally Posted by teslashock View Post
    I know you say that you think your professor doesn't want "fluff" in your descriptive essay, but metaphors and similes are not fluff according to most writers. Incorporating metaphors and similes is a standard method and one of the major ways that we can make writing creative. Metaphors are as cardinal to writing as a spices are to Indian cuisine. Compare x to y, and make x and y be completely different things, but compare them in a way that makes sense and that makes the details and meaning of x even clearer. Any given novel is wrought with metaphors; just open up to a descriptive paragraph and you'll see this.

    Readers don't want you to tell them what a rug feels like or how a sunset looks; any given audience already knows this. Readers want you to describe the physical characteristics on a deeper level, a way that makes them view something differently, or in a way that makes them realize something novel about whatever it is you're describing, and metaphors are a great way of doing this. Metaphors are ketchup for your fries, telescopes for viewing the stars, a colorful scarf to liven up an otherwise plain outfit; they make your writing more personal and your descriptions even more appealing to the senses.
    I like this a lot, too. Yeah; I might just do this- I just feel I'm giving the reader some sort of connotation subconsciously. I'll do this often; I describe something to someone, and they think I either do or do not like this something, when I really don't have an opinion on it at all- are there twitches in my face or something? And how does this work on paper?
    "Poor bastard. Wait 'till he sees the bats. "
    enneagram - 7/5/3

Similar Threads

  1. ESTP or Sensory ENTP?
    By Antimony in forum What's my Type?
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 11-21-2015, 10:29 PM
  2. [ENTP] Rant on ENTPs
    By Blackwater in forum The NT Rationale (ENTP, INTP, ENTJ, INTJ)
    Replies: 202
    Last Post: 09-30-2012, 10:20 AM
  3. [ENTP] ENTP personality type descritpion
    By SolitaryWalker in forum Myers-Briggs Type Profiles
    Replies: 54
    Last Post: 06-13-2010, 11:50 PM
  4. [ENTP] Are ENTPs aggressive/forceful?
    By substitute in forum The NT Rationale (ENTP, INTP, ENTJ, INTJ)
    Replies: 147
    Last Post: 05-04-2010, 06:13 AM
  5. [ENTP] Good Qualities of ENTPs
    By ygolo in forum The NT Rationale (ENTP, INTP, ENTJ, INTJ)
    Replies: 104
    Last Post: 11-29-2009, 09:16 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO