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  1. #41
    Protocol Droid Athenian200's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by INTP View Post
    Yea but hes being critical from analytical and objective perspective and thats something that Ti does if its placed over Fi. If he would be nf, he wouldt have Ti analyzing like that, or atleast not that easilly and he wouldnt trust this kind of analysis that much.
    That's true in general, but I would advise you to be careful about hardening general assumptions into hard-and-fast rules. It's only far less likely for an NF to use Ti like that. A really depressed ENFJ with developed Ti use might make such an analysis in certain situations, for instance.

    Ti over Fi only indicates on its own that he's not an FP.

    I just said it didn't prove anything on its own, not that it couldn't indicate anything. There's a difference. A rather important one.

    Also, I do actually think he's an INTP (or at least NT), but not based on this thread.

    Besides, he already admitted that he didn't intend the title literally, but as an attention getter, and that such an assertion wouldn't hold up to analysis.

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shimmy View Post
    I made an observation about myself yesterday which, after a bit of theorizing made me realize why I couldn't possibly be an NF...
    The realisation that everything I felt was merely a physical reaction with a logical cause and effect was soothing. I knew the reaction would end.
    In response to the original post, you describe the psychological defense mechanism "Intellectualization."
    Freud's Defense Mechanisms See "Intellectualization."

    Hate to burst bubbles but anyone can use this regardless of personality type.

    In fact, NFs possibly use this as a majority more healthily than NTs...because NFs need to rationalize their emotions to create balance.

    Is not homeostasis the goal for all organisms?

    According to Jungian Cognitive Function theory we develop processes as we age and adapt that are opposite to those existing originally, or developed early in life.

    I do not argue that you are NT and definitely not NF.

    However, your great desire to prove you are not NF may suggest that you are avoiding emotions. From my experience, someone such as yourself most likely has always used such a technique. Its very comfortable for you, no?

    So as a Teacher Idealist, I myself must as always compulsively mention that in the future you may find you want to grow, challenge yourself, reach outside your comfort zone.

    I do congratulate you for sharing such a personal experience. I really enjoyed reading it, and I understand from your account it was far out of your comfort zone.
    Quote Originally Posted by Athenian200 View Post
    A really depressed ENFJ with developed Ti use might make such an analysis in certain situations, for instance.

    Emotions: not that complex, just biology
    I myself have done a bit of thinking on this topic. I find rationalizing emotions proves quite useful.

    There have been times in my life when I overused intellectualization as a rule, and during those times I was not my healthiest self.

    However, I do not know that if an ENFJ follows the same analysis she/he is depressed, ie unhealthy.

    On the contrary, ENFJs can benefit from such an analysis to counter such intense emotions as one would expect an ENFJ such as myself to experience.
    Last edited by Afkan; 10-25-2009 at 03:58 PM.

  3. #43
    Senior Member Shimmy's Avatar
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    Afkan, have you not read the first paragraph in the OP?

    As for the dividing of emotions and happiness. Apparently Buddhist monks figured out as well how to do it.

    click!

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shimmy View Post
    Afkan, have you not read the first paragraph in the OP?

    As for the dividing of emotions and happiness. Apparently Buddhist monks figured out as well how to do it.

    click!
    Did I mention happiness?

    And yes I did read the first paragraph of the OP. Yet I wouldn't change any of my original response to your original post.

  5. #45
    Senior Member Shimmy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Afkan View Post
    Did I mention happiness?

    And yes I did read the first paragraph of the OP. Yet I wouldn't change any of my original response to your original post.
    The happiness thing was not in response to your post. It was just something I came across today on the world wide interwebs that day.

    As for your post:

    Hate to burst bubbles but anyone can use this regardless of personality type.
    This sentence struck me as obsolete. I already mentioned that the title of this thread does not cover my constatation. You are not "bursting my bubble". I'm sorry if I made it seem like I disagreed with you entirely.

    For the rest I greatly appreciate your post. I already stated that I indeed have always used this technique to some extend, tho it's only recently that I've come aware of it as I tend not to get into an emotional mess in the first place. I do believe that after all the good with this past relationship outweighs the bad and I'd do something similar again without a doubt. You are right that I find the technique very comforting. That's what this thread is about actually. I hope other people will find my learnings of use. And last but not least, yeah this was out of my comfort zone. I spend quite some time on the OP, just thinking, phrasing, doubting about what to write etc. I couldn't have done it if I felt particularly strong about it, and I wouldn't have felt the need if I didn't feel as strong about it. It was a fine balance.

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shimmy View Post
    The happiness thing was not in response to your post. It was just something I came across today on the world wide interwebs that day.
    Oh, heehee.... I get defensive in regards to my sometimes overly positive outlook and read meaning that didnt exist... sry bout that!

    Quote Originally Posted by Shimmy View Post
    As for your post:
    This sentence struck me as obsolete. I already mentioned that the title of this thread does not cover my constatation. You are not "bursting my bubble". I'm sorry if I made it seem like I disagreed with you entirely.
    I see. Well I'm glad you pointed that out then, I'm sure it was irrelevant.
    And the phrase "I hate to burst your bubble" is rather argumentative in the first place, so I apologize.

    Quote Originally Posted by Shimmy View Post
    For the rest I greatly appreciate your post. I already stated that I indeed have always used this technique to some extend, tho it's only recently that I've come aware of it as I tend not to get into an emotional mess in the first place. I do believe that after all the good with this past relationship outweighs the bad and I'd do something similar again without a doubt. You are right that I find the technique very comforting. That's what this thread is about actually. I hope other people will find my learnings of use. And last but not least, yeah this was out of my comfort zone. I spend quite some time on the OP, just thinking, phrasing, doubting about what to write etc. I couldn't have done it if I felt particularly strong about it, and I wouldn't have felt the need if I didn't feel as strong about it. It was a fine balance.
    I really enjoyed reading your OP. And you are definitely the best judge of if you are balanced, by far better than me of course, so I definitely believe you.
    I was a little preachy and annoying, sry bout that too.

  7. #47
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    An NT probably wouldn't care about breaking up with the ex in the first place.

  8. #48
    Senior Member Shimmy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Triglav View Post
    An NT probably wouldn't care about breaking up with the ex in the first place.
    If I wouldn't have cared that would've meant that I wouldn't have cared about her in the first place, which in return would've meant that we wouldn't have been together anyway, or maybe just for the sex.

    I care, but I'm not making a problem out of it.

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