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  1. #1
    Senior Member kathara's Avatar
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    Default INTPs - predisposed to Paranoid personality disorder?

    I'll just paste the wiki article, that should be enough for the basis of a discussion.

    Paranoid personality disorder is a psychiatric diagnosis characterized by paranoia and a pervasive, long-standing suspiciousness and generalized mistrust of others. (DSM-IV)

    For a person's personality to be considered a personality disorder, an enduring pattern of characteristic maladaptive behaviors, thinking and personality traits must be present from the onset of adolescence or early adulthood. Additionally, these behaviors, traits and thinking must be present to the extent that they cause significant difficulties in relationships, employment and other facets of functioning.

    Those with paranoid personality disorder are hypersensitive, are easily slighted, and habitually relate to the world by vigilant scanning of the environment for clues or suggestions to validate their prejudicial ideas or biases. They tend to be guarded and suspicious and have quite constricted emotional lives. Their incapacity for meaningful emotional involvement and the general pattern of isolated withdrawal often lend a quality of schizoid isolation to their life experience. [1]

    Differential diagnosis:

    * Because of the surface similarities of the paranoia involved, it is important that the paranoid personality disorder not be confused with paranoid schizophrenia, another totally different type of mental disorder where the patient has constant feelings of being watched, followed or persecuted.
    Descriptive diagnosis per American DSM-IV-TR

    Paranoid personality disorder is listed in the DSM-IV-TR as 301.00 Paranoid Personality Disorder.

    According to the DSM-IV-TR, this disorder is characterized by a pervasive distrust and suspicion of others such that their motives are interpreted as malevolent, beginning by early adulthood and present in a variety of contexts, as indicated by four (or more) of the following:

    * Suspects, without sufficient basis, that others are exploiting, harming, or deceiving him or her
    * Is preoccupied with unjustified doubts about the loyalty or trustworthiness of friends or associates
    * Is reluctant to confide in others because of unwarranted fear that the information will be used maliciously against him or her
    * Reads benign remarks or events as threatening or demeaning.
    * Persistently bears grudges, i.e., is unforgiving of insults, injuries, or slights
    * Perceives attacks on his or her character or reputation that are not apparent to others and is quick to react angrily or to counterattack
    * Has recurrent suspicions, without justification, regarding fidelity of spouse or sexual partner.

    The traits, behaviors and characteristics

    * Do not occur exclusively during the course of a mood disorder accompanied by psychotic features nor other psychotic disorders.
    * Are not due to the direct physiological effects of a general medical condition.

    [edit] International description per ICD-10

    The ICD-10 lists paranoid personality disorder as F60.0 Paranoid Personality Disorder.

    This personality disorder is characterized by at least 3 of the following:

    (a) excessive sensitivity to setbacks and rebuffs;
    (b) tendency to bear grudges persistently, i.e. refusal to forgive insults and injuries or slights;
    (c) suspiciousness and a pervasive tendency to distort experience by misconstruing the neutral or friendly actions of others as hostile or contemptuous;
    (d) a combative and tenacious sense of personal rights out of keeping with the actual situation;
    (e) recurrent suspicions, without justification, regarding sexual fidelity of spouse or sexual partner;
    (f) tendency to experience excessive self-importance, manifest in a persistent self-referential attitude;
    (g) preoccupation with unsubstantiated "conspiratorial" explanations of events both immediate to the patient and in the world at large.

    Includes:

    * expansive paranoid, fanatic, querulant and sensitive paranoid personality (disorder)

    Excludes:

    * delusional disorder
    * schizophrenia

    Personality Disorders

    A personality disorder is a severe disturbance in the characterological constitution and behavioral tendencies of the individual, usually involving several areas of the personality, and nearly always associated with considerable personal and social disruption. Personality disorder tends to appear in late childhood or adolescence and continues to be manifest into adulthood.

    It is therefore unlikely that the diagnosis of personality disorder will be appropriate before the age of 16 or 17 years. General diagnostic guidelines applying to all personality disorders are presented below; supplementary descriptions are provided with each of the subtypes.
    [edit] Diagnostic Guidelines

    Conditions not directly attributable to gross brain damage or disease, or to another psychiatric disorder, meeting the following criteria:

    (a) markedly disharmonious attitudes and behavior, involving usually several areas of functioning, e.g. affectivity, arousal, impulse control, ways of perceiving and thinking, and style of relating to others; (b) the abnormal behavior pattern is enduring, of long standing, and not limited to episodes of mental illness; (c) the abnormal behavior pattern is pervasive and clearly maladaptive to a broad range of personal and social situations; (d) the above manifestations always appear during childhood or adolescence and continue into adulthood; (e) the disorder leads to considerable personal distress but this may only become apparent late in its course; (f) the disorder is usually, but not invariably, associated with significant problems in occupational and social performance.

    ICD-10 copyright 1992 by World Health Organization.

  2. #2
    Senior Member tinkerbell's Avatar
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    eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeekkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk kkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk kkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk kkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk

    Sorry a personality dissorder, any of them to be picked up as a common dissorder would require something in the region of 3million cases in the US, there may be a sligh over empahsis of some MBTI type but given that INTP's are around 2-5% of the population, it would rquire a HUGE proportion of them to have a problem... It's a me thing... I know it just bugs me...

    Sorry I get twitchy generalising mental health dissorders, which I'm sure most people have figured out about me....

    All mental health dissorders/illnesses are normal tendancies taken to pretty extreme behaviours... I will PM you something

    Sorry you are not the Kat thought, sorry I've a bug bear about psyciatric dissorders being nocked out... it's not like you go round telling people you think they have MS or anything so why think you can diagnose a mental health dissorder.....

  3. #3
    Freshman Member simulatedworld's Avatar
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    I'd tentatively agree with the idea that INTPs might be more predisposed to paranoid personality disorder.

    I feel like INTJs are more likely to pop up with antisocial personality disorder...INTPs seem more desiring of personal interaction than INTJs, but sometimes don't know how to go about seeking it.
    If you could be anything you want, I bet you'd be disappointed--am I right?

  4. #4
    Habitual Fi LineStepper JocktheMotie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by simulatedworld View Post
    I'd tentatively agree with the idea that INTPs might be more predisposed to paranoid personality disorder.

    I feel like INTJs are more likely to pop up with antisocial personality disorder...INTPs seem more desiring of personal interaction than INTJs, but sometimes don't know how to go about seeking it.
    See I'd argue the opposite: I figured INTJs may be more susceptible to paranoia, while INTPs might be more schizoid/avoidant.

    But that's just because I identify more with schizoidal/avoidant behavior than I do paranoid behavior.



  5. #5
    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
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    I disagree. INTP's are probably least prone to be paranoid.

    We don't tend to make many assumptions at all. And definatly not without sufficient proof.

    I thought unhealthy Fi doms would be most prone to paranoya. Like unhealthy INFP's. :P

    I don't see how an INTP could be paranoid. Unless that INTP is just seriously unhealthy. In which case, what's being INTP got to do with it.
    ~Self-depricating Megalomaniacal Superwolf

  6. #6
    Senior Member Jaguar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tinkerbell View Post

    Sorry I get twitchy generalising mental health dissorders, which I'm sure most people have figured out about me....


    " I was robbed by a black man last week."
    " Oh really? I was robbed by a black man, last year."
    " Wow! I was robbed by a black man last month. Since all of us were robbed by black men, all black men must be robbers."

    Idiots.

  7. #7
    Senior Member kathara's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fluffywolf View Post
    I disagree. INTP's are probably least prone to be paranoid.

    We don't tend to make many assumptions at all. And definatly not without sufficient proof.

    I thought unhealthy Fi doms would be most prone to paranoya. Like unhealthy INFP's. :P

    I don't see how an INTP could be paranoid. Unless that INTP is just seriously unhealthy. In which case, what's being INTP got to do with it.
    At the same time, from a handful of clues we can build an entire scenario in our heads, finding logic and causality in random things.

  8. #8
    Freshman Member simulatedworld's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fluffywolf View Post
    I disagree. INTP's are probably least prone to be paranoid.

    We don't tend to make many assumptions at all. And definatly not without sufficient proof.

    I thought unhealthy Fi doms would be most prone to paranoya. Like unhealthy INFP's. :P

    I don't see how an INTP could be paranoid. Unless that INTP is just seriously unhealthy. In which case, what's being INTP got to do with it.

    Hmm, maybe, but you do tend to be very paranoid about trying new things because they might potentially go wrong...especially those of you with weak secondary Ne, because then Si comes in and reinforces Ti's introverted tendencies to unnecessarily high levels.


    Quote Originally Posted by Jaguar View Post
    " I was robbed by a black man last week."
    " Oh really? I was robbed by a black man, last year."
    " Wow! I was robbed by a black man last month. Since all of us were robbed by black men, all black men must be robbers."

    Idiots.
    Holy Christ in Heaven your Ne is horrible.

    Let me clue you in a little here, champ--this is a process called induction, by which we use patterns to suggest probable conclusions without absolute information. This thread is here to explain that he's noticed a correlation and ask if anyone else has noticed any similar correlations, which will either increase or decrease the probability in his mind of this correlation turning out to be significant.

    Nobody ever suggested that all black men are robbers; we're merely discussing a potentially higher probability for a specified grouping, not making 100% generalizations about every single individual member of the group.

    Seriously Donnie, you're out of your element here. I'd stick to barking orders and alienating people if I were you.
    If you could be anything you want, I bet you'd be disappointed--am I right?

  9. #9
    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kathara View Post
    At the same time, from a handful of clues we can build an entire scenario in our heads, finding logic and causality in random things.
    The key to wisdom and understanding is keeping answers in reserve. Everyone should know that.

    Whenever I 'build a scenario' as you so put it, without sufficient arguement or truth in it. I will most assuredly not commit myself to that assumption and keep an open mind.

    So one could say, being paranoid is being close minded. Again, nothing to do with MBTI. And I still don't see how INTP's are prone to paranoya. Not unless they're unhealthy to begin with.
    ~Self-depricating Megalomaniacal Superwolf

  10. #10
    Habitual Fi LineStepper JocktheMotie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by simulatedworld View Post
    ^ Hmm, maybe, but you do tend to be very paranoid about trying new things because they might potentially go wrong...especially those of you with weak secondary Ne, because then Si comes in and reinforces Ti's introverted tendencies to unnecessarily high levels.
    I think that's different from paranoia, since with paranoia there's usually a personal "how can this be used against me" sentiment with essentially everything. I don't disagree INTPs can be prone to precisely the behavior you mentioned...I just wouldn't call it paranoia.



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