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  1. #1
    Senior Member tinkerbell's Avatar
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    Default Learning to screw up....

    Something that seems to be coming through from folks recently is the fear of screwing up - or being seen to screw up.

    An example of what I mean
    I work in a fairly fast paced enviroment and I've worked hard to encourage my team to foster a culture of excellence.. In order to make this a reality it's neessesary to make the culture equaly supportive of screwing up...

    The whole thought behind this is you are not pushing beyond your comfort zones if you are not screwing up occationally... Which may appear counter intuative.. but better to be hauling people out of trouble than having to push them to do stuff.. Yes the idea is not haivng to haul them out of trouble but the bottom line is fostering of bravery of the attempt.....


    But don't limit yourselfs to work - I mean life too....
    Anyone got view on screwing up, making yourself more comfortable with fear of failure, encouraging yourself to be brave or do things you normally wouldn't do.

    Some possible examples
    Chatting to the girl in the shop
    Asking someone out
    Moving countrys
    Leaving your partner
    Quitting your job

    Things stop you doing stuff you want to do... what helps you feel the fear and do it anyways (sorry thats the title of a book)

  2. #2
    ♪♫♪♫♪♫ luminous beam's Avatar
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    I think how "courageous" a co-worker should be depends on his role within the company. If he/she has a role where the company would benefit from them taking risks, despite making potential mistakes, then they should be motivated to do so. However, if you have a company and employees required to follow regulations and procedures, I would discourage adamant risk taking. Usually, CEOs, managers and supervisors are left to make the risque decisions. Those need to be the courageous ones and innovative thinkers. The rest are usually minions.


  3. #3
    Senior Member tinkerbell's Avatar
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    Hi LuminosB

    I didn't just mean at work, but you are spot on, I have been working in an innovative creative environment which is fostering an organisational culture change.

    I wasn't on mass recommending advocating risk taking at work, more the concept of being restrained by fear of failure/screwing up in everyday life.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Shimmy's Avatar
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    [CLICHE]Hmm, there is no such thing as a screw-up, only learning experiences.[/CLICH]

    Obviously I think screw ups should be avoided if possible, but when they do occur, it's look at them rationally, learn from them, improve and retry. There is no point in condemning screw ups since they're prone to happen occasionally.

    The only really bad screw up is the one made twice.

  5. #5
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    Default

    I think the big issue is fear of punishment and embarrassment when one makes a mistake.

    If people feel they will be ridiculed, or people will think they are incompetent, or they think they might get docked a raise or lose a bonus or suffer some other tangible hardship for making a mistake, then they won't go there.

    There are also passive people who naturally are not comfortable leading. Try to get them to "lead" (i.e., show initiative) within their area of competence, but don't expect them to be someone they are not.

    I think when people are not reacting out of fear or potential loss, they will naturally invest and engage in whatever matters to them.

    Hire people who are good at what they do.

    Get them training in their work if they feel they have weak spots.

    Don't punish them / Encourage them when they take risks.

    If a problem occurs because someone goofed, deal with it without lots of recrimination. Don't make mistakes personal. have a post mortem, see what can be done differently next time.

    Foster communication on the team -- everyone is everyone else's resource. No one needs to just "make decisions" and risk failure, they can get someone else's input first.

    Get work delegated to appropriate people, rather than forcing people to work outside comfort zone all the time.

    I dunno... just random ideas.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  6. #6
    pathwise dependent FDG's Avatar
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    Yeah, you're right. I think the problem is often seen under either a lens of career advancement, or a lens of possibility of being fired. In more "horizontal" companies it should be easier to encourage personal innovation.

    Talking about personal life, that's harder. People will criticize you for whatever you do, rarely looking at their own mistakes (although it gets better with people that had to go trough something similar), and the "better" you are, the higher the expectations will be, the harder people will be on you. This type of vicious cycle doesn't foster entrepreneurship.
    ENTj 7-3-8 sx/sp

  7. #7
    ♪♫♪♫♪♫ luminous beam's Avatar
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    In terms of individuals taking risks, overcoming fear of failure, challenging themselves to step out of their comfort zones, it is something that has to be done without putting much thought on, especially not if you're terrified of failing. You fix your goal on overcoming fears and expanding your boundaries and so you do that, despite how it makes you feel. Usually, doing something out of the ordinary, especially something that you dislike, is very tiring, stressful and takes a toll. However, the reality is that like any other habit, you can re-train yourself to do things differently. Eventually, you could even enjoy challenging yourself to do the opposite or the least likely if you didn't enjoy doing so already. Some people just really like growing and improving as a person, but in order for that to happen we must confront the things that hinder us.


  8. #8
    Senior Member tinkerbell's Avatar
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    I had better point out, we don't force people to push their boundaries... just encourage them to do so... And not everyone is ready for it... I have a particularly senior team (who have a load of experience)....it helps them not get board.

    I would point out that one persons brave/couragous is another man's peice of cake...so it's a real moving feast.... The team love the sense of freedom they have - and they really do reach for the stars which is awesome to be part off...

    I have to say my attitude to personal risk has changed and I think I'm a bit more reserved now than I use to be.... which isn't that reserved...

  9. #9
    Senior Member tinkerbell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FDG View Post
    Talking about personal life, that's harder. People will criticize you for whatever you do, rarely looking at their own mistakes (although it gets better with people that had to go trough something similar), and the "better" you are, the higher the expectations will be, the harder people will be on you. This type of vicious cycle doesn't foster entrepreneurship.
    That is SO true... damned if you do, damned if you don't. I guess it's all boils down to what you think the consiequences (?sp) are...

    GEEK ALERT
    I did a stats class at Uni which went through the 5 decision making constraints...

    Min - min - put a little in get a little out (tasting something)
    Min - max - put a little in get a lot out (investing in shares)
    Maxi - min - trying to get a minimum outcome (damage limitation)
    Maxi -max - Trying to get the most (gamblng)
    Least possible regret - best option - avoiding things you don't want....

    I have to say I make most of my decisions on the last one...

  10. #10
    pathwise dependent FDG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tinkerbell View Post
    That is SO true... damned if you do, damned if you don't. I guess it's all boils down to what you think the consiequences (?sp) are...

    GEEK ALERT
    I did a stats class at Uni which went through the 5 decision making constraints...

    Min - min - put a little in get a little out (tasting something)
    Min - max - put a little in get a lot out (investing in shares)
    Maxi - min - trying to get a minimum outcome (damage limitation)
    Maxi -max - Trying to get the most (gamblng)
    Least possible regret - best option - avoiding things you don't want....

    I have to say I make most of my decisions on the last one...
    Nice, it's actually never been mentioned to me as a 5-fold decision making process, it's a really good way to look at it. I feel like many people love if you (especially if they "care" about you) take the maximin approach, that is avoiding all possible pitfalls - but that also could be due to me having SJ parents.
    ENTj 7-3-8 sx/sp

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