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  1. #1
    Dreaming the life onemoretime's Avatar
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    Default The ultimate NT books

    All opinions, of course.

    List what book you think best represents your personality type and its view of the world. While many of these can be your favorite book, they don't all have to be. Personally, I see this list skewing more toward the fiction side, but I'm having trouble seeing how it could be anything but a scientific treatise for an INTP. To start:

    ENTP: The Sun Also Rises, Ernest Hemingway - A group of friends constantly traveling with one another around Europe, with the only rationale often being "well that sounds like fun!". Near-constant consumption of alcohol with the intention of boosting the experience. The two main characters are highly impulsive in nature, with Brett constantly seeking new relationships with other men because of the inability to consummate her relationship with Jake, even though for all intents and purposes they have consummated already. It is the emasculation and thus prevention of climax that creates the longing, not necessarily the need to be totally with one another. Jake's gregarious nature is tempered by a need to retreat and process information. By the end of the novel, the characters grow unnerved by their inability to see any of their great long-term ideas through, which is a reflection of Western society's inability to save the promise of the turn-of-the-century from the self-destruction of World War I.

    Your thoughts?

  2. #2
    resonance entropie's Avatar
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    Hermann Hesse - Steppenwolf:

    This novel is supposedly the writings of Harry Haller, a lonely intellectual who feels isolated from the rest of the world. The story is the account of his existential transformation. Beyond the plot, it is an exploration, a painful one, on the hollowness, emptiness and meaninglessness of life. It talks about how lonely we really are, in the confusing and unexplainable world in which we live. It also talks about the desperation routine brings on, the fakeness of love, the necessity of death. But, in the final analysis, it also shows a probably undeserved love for life. This is not a simple "grunge" book: it's thoughtful philosophy expressed in a fine literary piece of work, which shows vividly some concepts that sometimes formal philosophy renders in abstract and obscure ways.
    Harry Haller, the steppenwolf, will meet a simple woman who takes him into the life of the flesh and the simplicity of people. This is very important: Haller comes to realize, in an intuitive more than analytical way, how we all humans feel the same loneliness and confusion, but how most of us manage to live and somehow enjoy many aspects of being alive.

    This is an intelligent, deep and moving novel. It is not always pleasant, but then again life is not always pleasant either. Steppenwolf is perhaps the novel in which Hesse best sums up many of the points made in his other novels, previous or subsequent. It is the round-up of a clear and interesting philosophy of life. No wonder people, especially young people, keep finding inspiration, advice and healing in his works. Maybe I shouldn't give it five stars, for it can't be compared with top-level literary masterpieces; but I think literature's importance is not only and not always stylistical. The content is important too, and at least for me, this is one of the most inspiring and memorable novels I've ever read.
    [URL]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tEBvftJUwDw&t=0s[/URL]

  3. #3
    DoubleplusUngoodNonperson
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    hmmm, did you only mean fiction books? because my copy of the basic works of Aristotle has become my fucking bible for scientific guidance

  4. #4
    Dreaming the life onemoretime's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nozflubber View Post
    hmmm, did you only mean fiction books? because my copy of the basic works of Aristotle has become my fucking bible for scientific guidance
    Nope, I figured INTPers would most likely be non-fiction: no time for flights of fancy when there's so much to learn from objective reality!

  5. #5
    Senior Member Valuable_Money's Avatar
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    HOUSE of Leaves
    Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh? wgah'nagl fhtagn

  6. #6
    Senior Member Willfrey's Avatar
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    I enjoyed reading 'The Elegant Universe'

    It was reccomended to me on here by a fellow INTP.
    ...Then I ducked my head and the lights went out, and two guns blazed in the dark;
    And a woman screamed, and the lights went up, and two men lay stiff and stark...

  7. #7
    Senior Member Galusha's Avatar
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    World War Z for the perspective, Candide for the schadenfreude, The Power of One for success and ambition, The Trial for reality

  8. #8
    Senior Member Shimmy's Avatar
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    Recommended for shy INTPs: Neill Strauss' - The Game.

    As for NT fiction I would recommend: Umberto Eco's - Foucault's Pendulum, Tolstoy's - War and Peace, Assimov's - Foundation. Joyce's Ulysses is the only book I've never been able to finish.

    I also like short stories by the hand of Asimov and Roald Dahl. They both usually write very witty short stories with a dark twist at the end.

  9. #9
    Circus Maximus Sarcasticus's Avatar
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    "Blood Meridian" by Cormac McCarthy. It appeals to me because it's very dark-- probably the most violent book I've ever read. But also because it turns the morality tale on it's head; the "bad guy" (and he is unbelievably evil) lives by a moral code of sorts (however twisted it may be), and the good guys (only marginally less evil) are caught in moral ambivalence at best, turpitude at worst. It's sort of a theme throughout McCarthy's work (fwiw he's an NT, probably INTJ).

  10. #10
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    Zen and the art of motorcycle maintenence really appealed to me. A lot of people read it and then never look back, but I've found it to be really intensive and deep. It essentially delves into what quality really is.

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