User Tag List

View Poll Results: At what age you develop your current MBTI personality

Voters
70. You may not vote on this poll
  • Age 0-11

    35 50.00%
  • Age 11-20

    26 37.14%
  • Age 20-30

    9 12.86%
  • Age 30 and after

    0 0%
First 23456 Last

Results 31 to 40 of 108

  1. #31
    Senior Member Misty_Mountain_Rose's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    4w5
    Posts
    1,123

    Default

    You know... I put the second option 20-30 I think it was... but looking back I think I must have been pretty close. I can actually remember the changes though.

    Before age 7 when my parents divorced I was a bit of a clown and an extrovert. I liked people.

    Age 7-19 I was most constantly INTJ

    Somewhere around age 20 I began to have tons of feelings that I'd buried and ignored all throughout my childhood bubbling to the surface and became maybe an INTJ under stress, calling on Se and Fi most heavily, but didn't feel at all like myself. I made horrible decisions, cried a lot and had emotional breakdowns left and right while I tried to figure out what to do with all of this overwhelming excess.

    Around 27 I finally found the balance I'd been looking for, oddly enough aligning with when I began learning Kung Fu. Probably not a coincidence.
    Embrace the possibilities.

  2. #32
    heart on fire
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    8,457

    Default

    I've daydreamed my life away...a quiet rebel.

    At about 33 experienced a strong onset of what I assume is Te, no longer content with being so quiet or passive, became far more cynical and have darker sense of humor.

  3. #33
    Intriguing.... Quinlan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    MBTI
    ISFP
    Enneagram
    9w1
    Socionics
    Booo
    Posts
    3,005

    Default

    Prior to about two-thirds the way through high school I was pretty much stereotypical iSFP and probably came across that way, after that point I completely shut down from the outside world and probably came across to others as a very serious, quiet and somber ISTJ kind of person.
    Act your age not your enneagram number.

    Quinlan's Creations

  4. #34
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    693

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaguar View Post
    You owe all ESTP's an apology.

    BTW, don't even try: "I was just kidding."
    That bullshit comment you just laid on Qre:us, won't fly with me.
    Here's a little history of your posts about Sensors:

    "SP's are chaotic, random, aggressive, and rather tasteless. "

    "Well, if people like those are Sensors... I talk to them as little as possible, because they bore and annoy me. They're like two-year olds."

    "No, no... you see, sensors ARE supposed to BE the mob. We intuitive types are the victims of the mob."

    "To be frank with you, I almost never consider S as a typing for someone I like "


    Like I said, don't even try to claim you are kidding.
    Your snide remarks precede you.
    Knock it off and grow up.
    Jag,

    I think she is newer to this stuff and thus takes it more seriously than it really is. You can always spot the newbies when they talk about sensors as if they are a different species. I mean c'mon we all use s and n. I'd even venture to say there are many "s" types who have developed their intuition beyond that of many supposed "n" types. To paraphrase all of the psychologists and psychotherapists I have drilled on the subject, MBTI is much more useful as lighthearted cocktail party conversation than it is as way to understand others.

  5. #35
    failure to thrive AphroditeGoneAwry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    MBTI
    INfj
    Enneagram
    451 sx/so
    Socionics
    ENFj Ni
    Posts
    5,651

    Default

    i think you're born with the personality type you're born with, right? kinda like physical features. sure, they change somewhat with growth and time, but they're always fundamentally the same.

    i also wonder how likely it is to have children with absolutely different functions than both their parents. for example, if a man is istp and a woman is isfp, how likely is it that they have 'enj' kids? not likely? doesn't matter? what?
    Ni/Ti/Fe/Si
    4w5 5w4 1w9
    ~Torah observant, Christ inspired~
    Life Path 11

    The more one loves God, the more it is that having nothing in the world means everything, and the less one loves God, the more it is that having everything in the world means nothing.

    Do not resist an evil person, but to him who strikes you on the one cheek, offer also the other. ~Matthew 5:39

    songofmary.wordpress.com


  6. #36
    garbage
    Guest

    Default

    I tended to keep Ne to myself, using it on my hobbies such as game programming and composing songs. I kind of suppressed it until I got into research, where I've found it to be immensely useful. Multitasking and brainstorming rules. Now, I also let it loose in social situations and in weird Facebook status updates, and I'm told that it "gives me a lot of character." Constantly.

    Oh, and this.

    So, to answer the OP.. how old am I now?

    Quote Originally Posted by aphrodite-gone-awry View Post
    i think you're born with the personality type you're born with, right? kinda like physical features. sure, they change somewhat with growth and time, but they're always fundamentally the same.

    i also wonder how likely it is to have children with absolutely different functions than both their parents. for example, if a man is istp and a woman is isfp, how likely is it that they have 'enj' kids? not likely? doesn't matter? what?
    My dad's ENTP*, I'm ENTP*, my mother's ISFJ, and my sister is ESFJ. We've got a weird family..

    I think there are some type and genetics threads that might be interesting.

    *yes i have said otherwise; no need to point this out to me

  7. #37
    Senior Member Jaguar's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    12,443

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank View Post
    Jag,

    I think she is newer to this stuff and thus takes it more seriously than it really is. You can always spot the newbies when they talk about sensors as if they are a different species. I mean c'mon we all use s and n. I'd even venture to say there are many "s" types who have developed their intuition beyond that of many supposed "n" types. To paraphrase all of the psychologists and psychotherapists I have drilled on the subject, MBTI is much more useful as lighthearted cocktail party conversation than it is as way to understand others.
    Frank--

    Athenian is a "he."
    I agree with the rest of your post.
    Having said that, it gets old reading:

    "why do NT's suck dolphin dick?"
    " why do SP's suck tennis balls?"

    It gets to the point where you have to just say: WTH is wrong with people?

  8. #38
    Protocol Droid Athenian200's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    4w5
    Posts
    8,828

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank View Post
    Jag,

    I think she is newer to this stuff and thus takes it more seriously than it really is. You can always spot the newbies when they talk about sensors as if they are a different species. I mean c'mon we all use s and n. I'd even venture to say there are many "s" types who have developed their intuition beyond that of many supposed "n" types. To paraphrase all of the psychologists and psychotherapists I have drilled on the subject, MBTI is much more useful as lighthearted cocktail party conversation than it is as way to understand others.
    Yes.

    Seriously, I say things about "Sensors," half-jokingly (especially considering that in the case of ESTPs, I should be complaining about my own shadow) but I wouldn't make any judgments about an individual until I got to know them. If I liked them as individuals, I certainly wouldn't think less of them if I found out their type.

    "Sensing" is just the best way to describe, within MBTI, the qualities that frustrate me most in people. But there may be no such thing as sensing. If you want my honest opinion, I don't think Sensing/Intuition is a real dichotomy. People usually use it to mean several things.

    The whole point of MBTI is that everything you say about someone else, is only from your own perspective, a projection of how you relate to that part of yourself. People seem to forget that and take part of the system with them, trying to apply it as if it were externally valid like an aptitude test. And along with that, people take things said about types as if it were a statement about an actual group of people, like racism, instead of taking it correctly as a statement of one's feelings towards one's own set of projected internal archetypes.

    So, with that, I'll leave you with two thoughts:

    "We don't see things as they are, we see things as we are."

    "It takes one to know one."

  9. #39
    Senior Thread Terminator Aerithria's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    5w4
    Posts
    568

    Default

    I remember being ridiculously argumentative from a young age, which is probably a sign, given my type's reputation. However, I was friends with an ESTP for a looong time, who was a fairly big troublemaker, which greatly influenced my childhood. Those were interesting times, heh. I think I acted pretty ISFJ-ish for a lot of that. It wasn't until she and I went our separate ways was I able to be my quirky oddball self, so around 12 for me.
    [insert funny quote/saying/etc.]

  10. #40
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    693

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaguar View Post
    Frank--

    Athenian is a "he."
    I agree with the rest of your post.
    Having said that, it gets old reading:

    "why do NT's suck dolphin dick?"
    " why do SP's suck tennis balls?"

    It gets to the point where you have to just say: WTH is wrong with people?
    Yeah I get what you mean. I'm starting to think WTH is wrong with me for wasting so much time here. It was entertaining for awhile but as you said, it gets old.

Similar Threads

  1. [Jung] At what age do one's cognitive functions become too developed to be typed?
    By PocketFullOf in forum Myers-Briggs Type Profiles
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 12-31-2016, 11:32 PM
  2. At what age can you be typed?
    By themightyfetus in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 08-07-2015, 05:18 PM
  3. Have you developed your tertiary function? Look at your enneagram.
    By Kensei in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-06-2015, 01:47 PM
  4. At what age did you learn how to play chess ?
    By Virtual ghost in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 38
    Last Post: 11-11-2009, 01:46 PM
  5. Why did you choose your current (or past) avatar(s)?
    By Totenkindly in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 53
    Last Post: 07-12-2007, 11:03 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO