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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by poppy View Post
    (there are at least 3 or 4 people I've been putting off talking to)
    no need to chat for long at all, just maintain the appearance that you are 'in touch'


    Not sure if I am describing this correctly but: I feel like conversation with INTJs gets boring quickly. They are largely focused on one thing or 'thread', and if I want to flit around a bit the INTJ becomes stubborn and unwilling to follow or take seriously my hypothetical lines of thinking. Leads to a bit of a standoff.

  2. #32
    HAHHAHHAH! INTJ123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lamp View Post
    no need to chat for long at all, just maintain the appearance that you are 'in touch'


    Not sure if I am describing this correctly but: I feel like conversation with INTJs gets boring quickly. They are largely focused on one thing or 'thread', and if I want to flit around a bit the INTJ becomes stubborn and unwilling to follow or take seriously my hypothetical lines of thinking. Leads to a bit of a standoff.
    he's probably stressed out and obsessing over solving something in his mind. These are our less sociable moments.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Night View Post
    It's not the practicality of a career that motivates the INTJ, it's what 'career' provides as to better cultivate internal vision of identity. 'Career' is an excuse to pursue identity, while getting paid. Nothing more.

    Frothy terminology like 'job satisfaction' and '5-year plan' are often artificial landmarks offered as blunt distraction. Or as a shield, if you like, intended to haze unwanted visibility from his real goals. This is done to prevent misguided curiosity from changing the complexion of what he finds significant. Buying into 'workforce culture' is typically an expression of insincerity for the INTJ, as it requires abandonment of individuality in favor of easy group participation.

    I suspect this is one of the primary differences between xNTJs and xSTJs.
    yea it's something like that, let's just say a routine job well done at work feels pretty good, but a dream realized feels like an orgasm. SJs seem to get enough satisfaction in just doing their daily jobs.

  4. #34
    Senior Member Saslou's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by INTJ123 View Post
    yea it's something like that, let's just say a routine job well done at work feels pretty good, but a dream realized feels like an orgasm. SJs seem to get enough satisfaction in just doing their daily jobs.
    OK, so are there INTJ's out there where they haven't realised their dream? or they have realised it but not put it into practice. I mean people in their 30 - 40's.
    “I made you take time to look at what I saw and when you took time to really notice my flower, you hung all your associations with flowers on my flower and you write about my flower as if I think and see what you think and see—and I don't.”
    ― Georgia O'Keeffe

  5. #35
    Boring old fossil Night's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by INTJ123 View Post
    yea it's something like that, let's just say a routine job well done at work feels pretty good, but a dream realized feels like an orgasm. SJs seem to get enough satisfaction in just doing their daily jobs.
    I would take it a bit further, actually: The satisfaction of realizing internal truth is of far greater ecstasy than the temporary joy of orgasm.

    Almost a discovery of some profound cosmic pattern, previously obscured under (seemingly) conspiratorial terms. It's as if one has solved a decades-old investigation, wherein the evidence confirms an 'answer' long ago anticipated, but never before appreciated by anyone other than the INTJ.

    It's a grand confirmation of something. What it means specifically is relative to the individual.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by saslou View Post
    OK, so are there INTJ's out there where they haven't realised their dream? or they have realised it but not put it into practice. I mean people in their 30 - 40's.
    Yes there certainly are intjs like that out there, everyone is unique regaurdless of matching types. Realizing a dream is NOT EASY, it can take a lifetimes work of gaining knowledge, it can take a long time if not ever in their lives.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Night View Post
    I would take it a bit further, actually: The satisfaction of realizing internal truth is of far greater ecstasy than the temporary joy of orgasm.

    Almost a discovery of some profound cosmic pattern, previously obscured under (seemingly) conspiratorial terms. It's as if one has solved a decades-old investigation, wherein the evidence confirms an 'answer' long ago anticipated, but never before appreciated by anyone other than the INTJ.

    It's a grand confirmation of something. What it means specifically is relative to the individual.
    Yes I agree but to help the SJ understand I came up with a more sensual/tangible analogy of the experience.

  8. #38
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    sorry accidental double post

  9. #39
    Senior Member Saslou's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by INTJ123 View Post
    Yes I agree but to help the SJ understand I came up with a more sensual/tangible analogy of the experience.
    The SJ .. Lol. Thanks.

    I appreciate your thoughts and understand where you are coming from.
    “I made you take time to look at what I saw and when you took time to really notice my flower, you hung all your associations with flowers on my flower and you write about my flower as if I think and see what you think and see—and I don't.”
    ― Georgia O'Keeffe

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