User Tag List

First 23456 Last

Results 31 to 40 of 78

  1. #31
    Senior Member Qre:us's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    4,909

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fluffywolf View Post
    Well, I'm sorry, but crying has never fixed a problem in human history. :P
    Cool rationalization sat at the heels of the master whose rage over an injustice spurred him to let loose the attack dogs.

    Most problems in history, and their subsequent resolution was due to a subjective perceived sleight felt by one party by the other.



    Sorry, you believe I'm ignorant.
    Huh? What? When? Are you leading with feeling again?

    I'll leave it at saying that thinkers and feelers just act differently, have different standards of what is important. And personally I'm glad I am a thinker. I probably would have killed myself had I been a feeler by now, what would be the point in that. :P
    I think thinkers and feelers process feelings in very different ways.

  2. #32
    Lex Parsimoniae Xander's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    9w8
    Socionics
    INTj
    Posts
    4,463

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fluffywolf View Post
    Hey, I totally respect the feelers way of life, whatever works for them.

    I only expect the same in return. :P
    But that's it isn't it. To be your type and your type alone is to be only half a person... well roughly 66% to be more precise.

    Some people may well not regard your emotions as prevalent but those close to you would probably welcome a more colourful you. It stops the whole effort of guessing all the time. The number of people I've driven to distraction as they try to guess whether their attempts at being nice have worked or not is staggering. Nowadays I hope I'm a little easier to estimate. Not that this has hampered my ability to be obtuse or mysterious
    Isn't it time for a colourful metaphor?

  3. #33
    Senior Member Qre:us's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    4,909

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Xander View Post
    Sorry to be harsh but I'm trying for clarity here...

    You're either wrong because you think that F is feeling as in feeling emotion (A) or you're wrong because you're thinking that an attempt at classification is the reality (B). A implies B does not imply that B implies A.

    Btw, assuming that ^ are A and B.

    A - F is feeling as in feeling emotion
    B - attempt at classificiation is a reality.

    Neither are my thoughts. You inferred incorrectly.

    A implies B does not imply that B implies A.
    Is illogical, given above premise.

  4. #34
    Senior Member ptgatsby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    ISTP
    Posts
    4,474

    Default



    I don't actually remember F having anything to do with emotions. In regards to the OP, in MBTI-speak, it really has to do with detachment... of course, detachment can lead to less motivation to do things, but I don't see any indication that Fs are more or less motivated than Ts. Differently orientated, perhaps, but... that's about it.

    I disagree with the article, however. What is being described isn't "emotion", but motivation, making it (to me, anyway) circular reasoning. I have been run over by motivated 'emotionless' people, and have seen emotional people flounder. Having said that, emotions can definitely be classed as 'reactive', however I also think the 'reactive' parts do not represent motivation, least not long term drive.

  5. #35
    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    9 sp/sx
    Posts
    9,422

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Qre:us View Post

    Huh? What? When? Are you leading with feeling again?
    Feeling? No, just my intuition.

    Quote Originally Posted by Qre:us View Post
    but, it's really just ignorance of a feeling-based problem, hence superficial 'control'.
    Quote Originally Posted by Qre:us View Post
    rather than thinkers (who ignore through rationalization....as you example so succintly pointed out).
    Unless you totally didn't mean what you said. :P
    ~Self-depricating Megalomaniacal Superwolf

  6. #36
    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    9 sp/sx
    Posts
    9,422

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Xander View Post
    But that's it isn't it. To be your type and your type alone is to be only half a person... well roughly 66% to be more precise.

    Some people may well not regard your emotions as prevalent but those close to you would probably welcome a more colourful you. It stops the whole effort of guessing all the time. The number of people I've driven to distraction as they try to guess whether their attempts at being nice have worked or not is staggering. Nowadays I hope I'm a little easier to estimate. Not that this has hampered my ability to be obtuse or mysterious
    I don't leave much for guessing, I'm a very no nonsense guy to people close to me, they know exactly where I stand. (In a positive light.)
    ~Self-depricating Megalomaniacal Superwolf

  7. #37
    Senior Member Qre:us's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    4,909

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ptgatsby View Post


    I don't actually remember F having anything to do with emotions. In regards to the OP, in MBTI-speak, it really has to do with detachment... of course, detachment can lead to less motivation to do things, but I don't see any indication that Fs are more or less motivated than Ts. Differently orientated, perhaps, but... that's about it.

    I disagree with the article, however. What is being described isn't "emotion", but motivation, making it (to me, anyway) circular reasoning. I have been run over by motivated 'emotionless' people, and have seen emotional people flounder. Having said that, emotions can definitely be classed as 'reactive', however I also think the 'reactive' parts do not represent motivation, least not long term drive.
    Can you give a conclusive, agreed-upon definition of the difference between feeling and emotion?

  8. #38
    Senior Member Qre:us's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    4,909

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fluffywolf View Post
    Unless you totally didn't mean what you said. :P
    Or, you misinterpreted what I said.

    Originally Posted by Qre:us
    but, it's really just ignorance of a feeling-based problem, hence superficial 'control'.
    Ignorance meaning simply, not knowing, i.e., not knowing that the problem has the potential to be feeling-based. Not you in particular, unless you think it strikes a personal chord...then, feel free to personalize it to *you*.


    Originally Posted by Qre:us
    rather than thinkers (who ignore through rationalization....as you example so succintly pointed out).
    Ignore the feeling aspect by going first to rationalization. As your example pointed out (I had no thought to whether that example you used was you or Mary Poppins).

    Again, please do not put words in my mouth such as me calling you ignorant.

    Ignorance (not knowing) towards dealing with feelings as a primary disposition, does not an ignorant make. Just like ignorance (not knowing) towards dealing with situations through logic as a primary disposition, does not an ignorant make.

  9. #39
    Senior Member ptgatsby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    ISTP
    Posts
    4,474

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Qre:us View Post
    Can you give a conclusive, agreed-upon definition of the difference between feeling and emotion?
    Assuming we are talking about MBTI, I'd use the five sub categories in Step II:

    Empathetic
    Compassionate
    Accommodating
    Accepting
    Tender

    --

    Otherwise, I'd probably use some combination of a person's physiological response to an event. This tends to include the normal definition of feeling (ie: you "feel" something is wrong tends to involve physiological changes).

    The key thing here is that F, as in MBTI F, does not measure the 2nd definition well, if at all.

  10. #40
    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    9 sp/sx
    Posts
    9,422

    Default

    Ignorance meaning simply, not knowing, i.e., not knowing that the problem has the potential to be feeling-based. Not you in particular, unless you think it strikes a personal chord...then, feel free to personalize it to *you*.
    Whereas I believe that there is no such think as a feeling-based or thinking based situation. Every situation is of the same making, feelers just make it feeling-based, thinkers make it thinking based.

    I do not find either wrong, although I'm ofcourse biased towards thinking myself for obvious reasons.

    Ignore the feeling aspect by going first to rationalization. As your example pointed out (I had no thought to whether that example you used was you or Mary Poppins).

    Again, please do not put words in my mouth such as me calling you ignorant.

    Ignorance towards dealing with feelings as a primary disposition, does not an ignorant make. Just like ignorance towards dealing with situations through logic as a primary disposition, does not an ignorant make.
    I did say pretty clearly we do not ignore the feeling aspect. We just deal differently with it. (Although maybe I should say I, instead of we, here.)

    And that is why I perceived your opinion of me to be ignorant to such situations. Which is exactly what ignorant makes. I highly disagree wit your stance towards what T is. And just find it unfortunate you have such a low value of it.

    :|
    ~Self-depricating Megalomaniacal Superwolf

Similar Threads

  1. How Relevant is Philosophy To Actions?
    By BlackDog in forum Philosophy and Spirituality
    Replies: 36
    Last Post: 11-25-2014, 11:01 AM
  2. [INFJ] Call to Action for all INFJs
    By yeghor in forum The NF Idyllic (ENFP, INFP, ENFJ, INFJ)
    Replies: 114
    Last Post: 09-16-2014, 02:23 AM
  3. Box of condoms leads to evacuation
    By rivercrow in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 05-19-2011, 04:55 AM
  4. Ambivalent Childrearing, OR "Confusion Leads to Illumination"
    By Ivy in forum Philosophy and Spirituality
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 08-06-2007, 08:39 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO