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  1. #131
    ReflecTcelfeR
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    Do you understand why he doesn't have a personality? He's dead. Thus making this whole argument rather... pointless, as of now at least. You can ONLY interpret why he did his actions as I'm sure you did not know him personally. Typing him by his actions seems irrelevant because his actions don't necessarily lead to how he obtained his information, which is primarily what typing someone is doing.

    Now back on subject! I would say he was an ENFJ.

  2. #132
    ReflecTcelfeR
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    I also wouldn't just type him by his actions, but the goal he was aiming for, which would you give you more insight to his manner of thinking. I mean if we're going to do this let's look at all the information.

  3. #133
    What is, is. Arthur Schopenhauer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robopop View Post
    If Hilter was so great, why did he make all kinds of irrational decisions that cost him world war 2. And then he took the cowardly way out and killed himself. You aspire to be like that, Hilter is NO badass, more like a dickass coward.
    But, you see, no one said he was perfect.

    As for the suicide, some would say that suicide, instead of an act of cowardice, is a final act of bravery; as cowardice often prevents it.
    INTJ | 5w4 - Sp/Sx/So | 5-4-(9/1) | RLoEI | Melancholic-Choleric | Johari & Nohari

    This will not end well...
    But it will at least be poetic, I suppose...

    Hmm... But what if it does end well?
    Then I suppose it will be a different sort of poetry, a preferable sort...
    A sort I could become accustomed to...



  4. #134
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    Quote Originally Posted by MagnificentMind View Post
    But, you see, no one said he was perfect.

    As for the suicide, some would say that suicide, instead of an act of cowardice, is a final act of bravery; as cowardice often prevents it.
    I think that would have to depend upon the context of the situation and in Hitler's case I just can't find any bravery in it. In fact I just can't find bravery in any aspect of his "personality" whatever that "personality" was.

  5. #135
    What is, is. Arthur Schopenhauer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spin-1/2-nuclei View Post
    I think that would have to depend upon the context of the situation and in Hitler's case I just can't find any bravery in it. In fact I just can't find bravery in any aspect of his "personality" whatever that "personality" was.
    That's because you're taking it out of context.

    Do as you wish.
    INTJ | 5w4 - Sp/Sx/So | 5-4-(9/1) | RLoEI | Melancholic-Choleric | Johari & Nohari

    This will not end well...
    But it will at least be poetic, I suppose...

    Hmm... But what if it does end well?
    Then I suppose it will be a different sort of poetry, a preferable sort...
    A sort I could become accustomed to...



  6. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by MagnificentMind View Post
    That's because you're taking it out of context.
    No I think the problem is our individual definition of someone who is a coward and someone who is brave. Beyond the semantics of the words there are individual interpretations of behaviors, beliefs, actions etc that define said behaviors, beliefs, actions etc as either cowardly or brave - and we obviously don't agree on those interpretations.

  7. #137
    What is, is. Arthur Schopenhauer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spin-1/2-nuclei View Post
    No I think the problem is our individual definition of someone who is a coward and someone who is brave. Beyond the semantics of the words there are individual interpretations of behaviors, beliefs, actions etc that define said behaviors, beliefs, actions etc as either cowardly or brave - and we obviously don't agree on those interpretations.
    This paragraph did not need to be written.

    Why do you consider Hitler a coward?
    INTJ | 5w4 - Sp/Sx/So | 5-4-(9/1) | RLoEI | Melancholic-Choleric | Johari & Nohari

    This will not end well...
    But it will at least be poetic, I suppose...

    Hmm... But what if it does end well?
    Then I suppose it will be a different sort of poetry, a preferable sort...
    A sort I could become accustomed to...



  8. #138
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    Quote Originally Posted by MagnificentMind View Post
    This paragraph did not need to be written.

    Why do you consider Hitler a coward?
    There are so many reason it would really be impossible to list them all, so to be efficient I'll focus on what's been discussed here recently. His suicide.

    Supposedly he committed suicide because of a combination of imminent defeat and fear of ending up like Mussolini. Personally I find suicide under those circumstances cowardice. It isn't like he saved a round for himself (in the event he was captured and about to be tortured) and ran out to continue the "good fight". He never allowed others to surrender, he didn't even try to orchestrate a mass suicide of all Hitler supporting germans, which while delusional would have been a lot less cowardly (in the sense that he would finally at least be willing to extend the same comforts he gave himself to his men). I just don't see any bravery in anything Hitler did. He seemed to me to be a man that was out for vengeance and when it didn't go his way he killed himself rather than facing the music. If his cause was so just and so right why not defend it to the world courts at his trial or at least go down fighting with his men...

    To each his own, but Hitler just doesn't play out as brave to me.

  9. #139
    Senior Member Robopop's Avatar
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    Not only was Hilter an evil irrational asshole but both he and Stalin ignored reality. When their advisors and generals tried to warn them of impeding disasters, these were many times, they were threaten by execution.

  10. #140
    What is, is. Arthur Schopenhauer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spin-1/2-nuclei View Post
    There are so many reason it would really be impossible to list them all, so to be efficient I'll focus on what's been discussed here recently. His suicide.
    I don't really want to debate his entire life either.

    Supposedly he committed suicide because of a combination of imminent defeat and fear of ending up like Mussolini. Personally I find suicide under those circumstances cowardice.
    I see his suicide as more of a slap in the face to his enemies. To allow oneself to be made an example of, by those who you despise, is not honourable in the slightest. What honor and bravery is there in submission? None.

    They made an example of Mussolini; one that opposed his ideals. Hitler would have been paraded about like a prize and then executed in the name of something he did not believe in.

    A coward would have begged for mercy.

    It isn't like he saved a round for himself (in the event he was captured and about to be tortured) and ran out to continue the "good fight". He never allowed others to surrender, he didn't even try to orchestrate a mass suicide of all Hitler supporting germans, which while delusional would have been a lot less cowardly (in the sense that he would finally at least be willing to extend the same comforts he gave himself to his men).
    A dying slap in the face is a slap in the face. The troops were trained to kill others, not themselves and that is what they did, and that is why they died. They died in the name of a cause they believed in. Each soldier had the capacity to commit suicide with his gun, yet they chose to point it at the enemy instead, because they believed in something.

    Sure, Hitler could have ran out onto the battlefield with a pea-shooter and a flag, but if he had died on the field, morale would have died with him; along with each mans reason to fight. He did not surrender in the slightest and neither did his men.

    I also find it strange that you believe suicide is comfortable.

    I just don't see any bravery in anything Hitler did. He seemed to me to be a man that was out for vengeance and when it didn't go his way he killed himself rather than facing the music.
    Yes, he killed himself because he didn't get his way... Heh.

    If his cause was so just and so right why not defend it to the world courts at his trial or at least go down fighting with his men...
    As if they would have let him live... A laughable thought. Secondly, he did go down fighting with his men as they died believing in something he helped create. He gave them purpose. They all died in Berlin, my friend.
    INTJ | 5w4 - Sp/Sx/So | 5-4-(9/1) | RLoEI | Melancholic-Choleric | Johari & Nohari

    This will not end well...
    But it will at least be poetic, I suppose...

    Hmm... But what if it does end well?
    Then I suppose it will be a different sort of poetry, a preferable sort...
    A sort I could become accustomed to...



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