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  1. #1
    Summer laintpe's Avatar
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    Default INTP's in leadership positions?

    Soooo... my tennis team voted for team captain... and I'm it. It's not a major responsibility compared to other tasks... definitely not as much prep as leading a group of 20 calc students; however, it's more difficult in the sense that... I'm not very verbal, especially when it comes to subjective/emotional issues (and womens' tennis is outrageously dramatic). Anyway, I'm wondering if any other INTP's have leadership experiences/advice to share... especially those of you with a few more years of "real life" exposure.
    [B]Ti=Ne>Ni>Fe>Te=Fi>Si>Se

    LII

    Quote Originally Posted by Nocap
    Quote Originally Posted by laintpe
    Quote Originally Posted by Nocap
    Ideally I'll be the woman

  2. #2
    Emerging Tallulah's Avatar
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    I think an INTP's strength in leadership is noticing the strengths of others and encouraging them to be the best on their own terms--not measure up to someone else's standard. People appreciate someone having faith in them and giving them autonomy. It also helps to take note of which people need more rules/discipline in order to succeed, and which ones need more space or encouragement. That's what I've learned from teaching, anyway.
    Something Witty

  3. #3
    Senior Member Simplexity's Avatar
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    I never cared much for attention and didn't really see that as an integral part of my job as a player. I loved having fun and my shyness played out in me accepting compliments from others in a very awe struck way. I would usually try and deflect it in anyway possible.

    I did however have a way leading by action in a sense. I think one of my greatest abilities was never to sort of draw attention to myself. There were always little internal competitions that went on especially in regards to me, my position and how much I produced. I never really paid attention to it. I had sort of a selfless personality that way because I didn't really register much of the noise when it came to the intricate interpersonal issues that are rampant in sports. My introverted dedication really played out in game situations and I could really focus and not worry too much about other things other than the performances I could control. I was very simplistic in that sense. I think my ability to pace and rely on my ability to sense and project future scenarios and possible courses of action really helped me absorb and diffuse attention as I saw fit. I never really got jarred, I got intense, but I really loved taking advantage of situations. Practice was a different story all together. I loved taking the pressure off and making things a little fun to get people through.

    I think it would be a disservice to say that I didn't care and didn't put in effort. I did. I just always believed that working in a light open and interesting fashion while doing serious work always helped to prepare you for pressure situations. I was actually rather meticulous in fine tuning some aspects of my technical form down, but I would always try and sort of do it in an abrupt casual manner, Repetitively. Think of it sort of like idle theorizing during menial tasks, or moments of rest, only to have the answer to a complex problem come to you at a moments notice. That is what I tried to encourage. It helped get that little bit of perfection when it was most crucial.

    I think a lot of people really appreciated that consistency and deflection. They never really sensed an ego, and believe me there were a fair share of people. Sometimes it can serve to give people freedom to express themselves. A lack of barriers and a freedom to venture out were things people appreciated because it gave them more confidence. It created a surprisingly mellow environment. Genuineness and a lack of ulterior motives is another thing that people come to like. Listening and considering things are very interesting to me and that wasn't much of a struggle. A little humor and self deprecation didn't hurt either.
    My cold, snide, intellectual life is just a veneer, behind which lies the plywood of loneliness.

  4. #4
    Senior Member blanclait's Avatar
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    I've had quite some leadership experience back in High school. In terms of big group projects.
    You don't have to be a great speaker or anything, along as you take the initiative to show that you care, the members will appreciate it.

    In my case, i usually talk pretty fast, almost like ENTP in a business setting. Sadly, not many people in highschool couldn't keep up with what the hell I was saying except those with good linguistic intelligence. So its not about how much you talk that matters, but how effectively.


    In terms of emotional issues, you have to at least pretend you care.
    Remember INTPs tend to ALWAYS give logical support to those who may be upset or something. Sure this is good sometimes, but you have to recognize when they are actually asking for help or just want something to lean on.
    Mixture is always good too, if your not sure.

    Optimism 24/7 is essential. No ONE. i mean NO ONE likes pessimistic leaders. I had a couple manager/leader who was like that. It was hell, it really dragged the team down in terms of motivation.

  5. #5
    Habitual Fi LineStepper JocktheMotie's Avatar
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    I've had a couple instances where I was given additional responsibility and identified by my peers as being someone they thought should be given the responsibility of "leading" a group.

    In school, I was part of a group called "natural helpers" that basically specialized in peer mediation and you were basically voted in by your class, the question sheet involving "who would you trust most to talk to" or something like that. Debate teams, or group projects, whenever a decision was needed or an argument needed settling it was usually thrown to me, though I never liked these situations.

    I think your teammates voted for you because they see you as someone who goes about your business, you're not one to let a petty difference impede your decision making. I think we often come across as impartial observers, and that is recognized by others so when it comes to putting someone in charge of a group, that person may be a bit more highly regarded. I think something that is important to find out, is what type of "leading" the team needs to do well. And once you can determine what your team needs in order to be effective in what they're doing, you can do what you do.

    Might not be as helpful as Aimahn's thoughts [which were superb], but just trust in your intuition about what you think your team needs in a captain, and do your best to be that, I suppose.



  6. #6
    Summer laintpe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aimahn View Post
    I would usually try and deflect it in anyway possible.

    Practice was a different story all together. I loved taking the pressure off and injecting a lack of fun to get people through.
    I don't feel like I can goof around as much... with this coach anyway... especially now... after the "captain responsibility" spiel. The only perk I see about this is that I can add something besides tutoring in during interview questions that ask about leadership.

    Quote Originally Posted by blanclait View Post


    In terms of emotional issues, you have to at least pretend you care.
    Remember INTPs tend to ALWAYS give logical support to those who may be upset or something. Sure this is good sometimes, but you have to recognize when they are actually asking for help or just want something to lean on.
    Mixture is always good too, if your not sure.

    LOL pretend. it's true though, sarcasm does not go over well with quite a few people... including my coach.


    Quote Originally Posted by JocktheMotie View Post

    In school, I was part of a group called "natural helpers" that basically specialized in peer mediation and you were basically voted in by your class, the question sheet involving "who would you trust most to talk to" or something like that. Debate teams, or group projects, whenever a decision was needed or an argument needed settling it was usually thrown to me, though I never liked these situations.
    Funny thing... I was in a peer mediation "club" (i guess) in middle school because my friends and I ate lunch with the counselors (yeah, we were definitely the cool kids)... but we never used it... and I'm really glad we didn't after seeing these two huge, scary girls jump across the table during one of the counselor's attempts at mediation.

    In group projects, I'd usually take the whole assignment and do it myself... depending on the class... it wasn't so much me being a control freak as it was the rest of the group... doing nothing. Really though, I preferred doing it alone and knowing it would be complete over crossing my fingers... or telling them to do something... and them showing up with something they scribbled down when the lunch bell rang. Group projects sucked.

    EDIT: (btw, I can't tell stories well, at all)
    I have to add this... just thinking about it makes my day... because it's probably the only time I ever did anything about the other person doing nothing in a group project. Anyway, in Spanish... there are always those "conversation presentations" that focus on the new chapter vocab... and I was always stuck with this guy who 1. didn't know Spanish at all and 2. wouldn't even attempt to do anything to help with our Spanish conversation mini-projects. So, I went out of the chapter and wrote a really long script that basically had him saying, "I have no idea what I'm saying"... "Laine always does all of the work on our projects"... and I threw in a few lines that had him making fun of himself (of course he didn't know)... and what was even better... when everyone started laughing (teacher included), he seemed to think they were laughing because he was saying something witty.. so he just kept going with it.. until someone decided to let him know. i think he threw a meter stick at me, but it was worth it.
    [B]Ti=Ne>Ni>Fe>Te=Fi>Si>Se

    LII

    Quote Originally Posted by Nocap
    Quote Originally Posted by laintpe
    Quote Originally Posted by Nocap
    Ideally I'll be the woman

  7. #7
    Don't pet me. JAVO's Avatar
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    Many people can't see how I'm leading. This leads them to assume I'm not.

    The solution is to be more communicative and explicit to followers and those who put you in the leadership position regarding what you're doing to lead. In most cases, a leadership position isn't worth this effort for me.

  8. #8
    Member metamorphysics's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by laintpe View Post
    EDIT: (btw, I can't tell stories well, at all)
    I have to add this... just thinking about it makes my day... because it's probably the only time I ever did anything about the other person doing nothing in a group project. Anyway, in Spanish... there are always those "conversation presentations" that focus on the new chapter vocab... and I was always stuck with this guy who 1. didn't know Spanish at all and 2. wouldn't even attempt to do anything to help with our Spanish conversation mini-projects. So, I went out of the chapter and wrote a really long script that basically had him saying, "I have no idea what I'm saying"... "Laine always does all of the work on our projects"... and I threw in a few lines that had him making fun of himself (of course he didn't know)... and what was even better... when everyone started laughing (teacher included), he seemed to think they were laughing because he was saying something witty.. so he just kept going with it.. until someone decided to let him know. i think he threw a meter stick at me, but it was worth it.
    LOL, thats so cruel...

    As for me, when im not in an endless form of thought obsessing about all possible bad outcomes, im a great speaker. Just be aware of your situation, think about where you want to situation to go, and how to do that using whatever means. Basically know people, the situation their in, and know how to manipulate them for a desired outcome.

    For example...

    I was a slacker, though I never let slacking get in the way of group projects seeing as then my lack of work would effect someone else, which would lead to many outcomes that I deemed to be undesireable, and many times I would do more/better work than my partner, while doing all of this "modestly"(becouse than that person respects and "owes" me).

    Or i might make myself appear like a "jolly idoit that wasnt actually an idoit"(present myself as least threatening as possible while making the person "enjoy" life as much as possible) b/c than most people want to become freindly with you, this allowed me to be part of all the social groups and be accepted by everyone, and it also gave me alot of time to think about the meaning of life, etc w/o becoming alianted from society, seeing as acting in this way with others came naturally to me.

    In religius discussions, my desired outcome was usually to convince the person that god didnt exist... Instead of using my own ideas(which the person usually blindly rejected) to prove something I started using other peoples ideas against them. I found that most Religious people are unable to deal with the reality of their own existence and thus if you want to prove something you must do it on the basis of the existence that they created. Using this method i managed to persuade people of different misunderstandings they had.

  9. #9
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    Rule with an iron fist.

    Sorry, that's all I've got.

  10. #10
    Minister of Propagandhi ajblaise's Avatar
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    I like leadership positions. I think a lot of people appreciate humble INTXs as leaders. No one wants an ENTJ or ESTJ breathing down their neck.

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