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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    I have always been into both fiction and non-fiction... but I have noticed that I read a LOT more fiction when I was younger (escapism? Still learning?) and nowadays I don't read much fiction at all and just read lots and lots of non-fiction (i.e., priming the pump for my own thoughts).

    That's how I see it, anyways. Now I create my own "worlds" and need information to do it; while younger, I was just reviewing what other people had done and getting my imagination to engage.
    When I was young, I often liked having stories read to me, because I just got impatient with the details of reading things to myself. The other problem with reading fiction I have is that it's too linear. When I read something or do research on something, I tend to dive into the juicy parts and then I work my way out to understand how it got that way -- so I'm more inductive.

    But that's the way I think the Intuitive mind works. They want to go into the part which stimulates their mind the most. The Sensor, by contrast, will start at the beginning to end for purposes of entertaining themselves with a story.

  2. #52
    Oberon
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xander View Post
    Well he got it wrong. Most have messed around with straight cartridges where as I worked with necked rifle rounds. Plus most people have made moves toward changes in regard toward one thing or another where as I was just aiming for overall efficiency. The most efficient size was something like an 11.76mm round I think 54mm in length. Depending upon barrel length and extra toys though it could weigh up to 11kgs or more (about 24lbs for you backwards lot). Oh and also I think that this was using electrothermic charges and not standard refined powder weapons.

    I presume your referring to the Browning of the high power fame, the guy who designed one of the best recoil operated handguns for many years? Can't say that history is my strongest suit you see. If you are referring to him then you do know that the 9x19mm parabellum round is not really that good right? It's used lots cause that's what people make. A bit like the 5.56mm superseding the 7.62mm. I bet they wish they hadn't bothered now. All that retooling only for people to plink from 400yards or go in with carbines (which would better suit the 5.56 admittedly but it's not a hard and fast rule).

    Oh and if you think this is really geek like, try me on 120mm computer fans
    Oh, I'm WAY geekier than you on gun stuff.

    John M. Browning was in fact the Browning of Browning Hi-Power fame, but also very much more than that. His career spanned (and arguably drove) the great western renaissance of firearms design that accompanied the invention of smokeless powder. His first commercial gun design was the model 1885 Winchester (a dropping-block single shot rifle suitable for hunting buffalo), and his last was the legendary Ma Deuce, the M2 .50 caliber Browning Machine Gun (suitable for hunting trucks).

    In between he designed a great number of guns which were and are highly prized today, including many that are still in production

  3. #53
    Oberon
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    …including the classic model 94 Winchester, the Browning Hi-Power, and the Colt 1911A1 pistol.

    Browning did not, in fact, have anything to do with the invention of the 9mm Parabellum, a.k.a. 9x19mm or 9mm Luger. The 9x19 was invented when someone in the Wehrmacht decided that .30 Luger was a weak sister of a cartridge, and they should see what happened if you blew the bottleneck out of it and made it a straight-taper cartridge. The result was the 9x19, a favorite among western militaries and homies in da hood, but not particularly admired by myself.

    The cartridge I was speaking of as having been perfected in 1906 was the U.S. Government .30 Caliber of 1906, also known as the .30-06. This bottlenecked cartridge has a cartridge head diameter of .475 inches, a bullet diameter of .308 inches, and a case length of 2.5 inches. It was derived from the earlier, weaker .30-03 cartridge. The .30-06 (say: thirty-ought six) is no longer used in military applications but is still extremely popular among hunters and recreational shooters. As loaded today it shoots a bullet of 150 grains at upward of 2900 feet per second, or more than twice the speed of sound. Heavier-bullet loadings are also available for larger game, with a corresponding drop in velocity.

    The later 7.62x51 NATO, also known (more or less) as the .308 Winchester, is currently used in military applications, particularly in sniper rifles, the select-fire M14, and the M60 machine gun. This cartridge is a derivative of the .30-06, having been designed under a mandate to produce a cartridge that would equal the performance of the .30-06 while being lighter and less bulky to carry. The 7.62x51 NATO shares case diameter and bullet diameter with the .30-06. Its main differences are that it’s shorter and loaded to higher pressure.

    Interestingly, the .45 ACP (or .45 Auto) is also a derivative of the .30-06 cartridge. This pistol cartridge was invented when someone on the ordnance board for the US military took a hacksaw and cut off a .30-06 case to .9 inches long, and said “Here’s what you’ll have to work with.” The resulting cartridge became the basis for the designs of the M1911 and M1911A1 pistols and the Thompson series of submachine guns.

  4. #54
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    So, no, I don't think he got it wrong.

  5. #55
    Member Llenyd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oberon67 View Post
    The Bradbury book included a couple of stories that REALLY got my attention, namely "The Fog Horn" and "A Sound of Thunder," both of which remain to this day some of the best fantasy/sci-fi stories ever written IMHO.
    But unfortunately a stinker of a movie.

  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Llenyd View Post
    But unfortunately a stinker of a movie.
    That's what happens when you try to turn a nice tight short story like "A Sound of Thunder" into a feature film.

    "The Foghorn" became The Beast from Twenty Thousand Fathoms, again not exactly an Oscar candidate, but probably excusable because they were aiming for a B-grade monster movie and hit the mark.

  7. #57
    ✿ڿڰۣஇღ♥ wut ♥ღஇڿڰۣ✿ digesthisickness's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    Here is what I got: "Why on EARTH would you ever want to read an [entire set of] encyclopedia[s]???"
    me too. and my immediate thought then, and still is, is "how can someone NOT want to?!?" i've read dictionaries, encyclopedias for everything i've been able to get my hands on, the physician's desk reference, DSMs, the list goes on and on (and continues to do so).

    they ask 'why?' then don't even realize that when they want to know something, they come to you. you'd think the 'why' would be clear at that moment.

    Beautiful way to phrase it. I consider libraries "sacred ground" ... but never took it as far as to include the family watercloset... despite the actual shelf that was in our bathroom growing up.
    i exclude nothing.

    but you did cause me to realize i need a book shelf in my bathroom.

    right now, i've got my crime library encyclopedias, please understand me II, a few other psyche books, and about forty of my archie comics in there...

    Gathering those tomes only got worse for me as I aged. Currently, I have compendiums on many different topics, that I saw on sale and thought would be interesting to read and learn about -- running on topics from knot-tying and mushroom species and mythology systems to the quintessential "shark" anthologies and how all sorts of machines work (conceptually) and a large tome on all different sorts of booze and how it is made.

    (Along with my "What Life Was Like" Time-Life historical review of various cultures and time periods, plus four or five other entire series.)

    It is just crazy.
    yeahhhhh! same here. (and good god, i'd like to read all of that)

    one year, i decided to have a yard sale, and filled tables with books that i knew damn well i'd never read again. they weren't 'up to snuff' information or credibility-wise. then as people started buying them, i panicked and ended up taking them all back inside. why? two reasons. one was a nagging suspicion that they wouldn't really appreciate them properly and secondly... "just in case"

    sounds like a sickness.

    Quote Originally Posted by oberon67 View Post
    I think your post amounts to an entire explanation for the existence of the Society for Creative Anachronism. Different people, same process.
    it's at times like these, in threads like these, that i'm reminded of just how much MBTI makes real sense to me. it may not be a perfect system yet, but, to me, when it comes to people, it can only be so perfect. and it's damn close.

    Quote Originally Posted by Uberfuhrer View Post
    When I was young, I often liked having stories read to me, because I just got impatient with the details of reading things to myself. The other problem with reading fiction I have is that it's too linear. When I read something or do research on something, I tend to dive into the juicy parts and then I work my way out to understand how it got that way -- so I'm more inductive.

    But that's the way I think the Intuitive mind works. They want to go into the part which stimulates their mind the most. The Sensor, by contrast, will start at the beginning to end for purposes of entertaining themselves with a story.
    oh, fiction. i avoid it unless desperate. when they start describing a bush that has absolutely nothing to do with the story line, but is meant to make me feel like i'm 'there', then i skip, skip, skip, until i get to the relevant part again while mumbling, "fucking BUSH... who gives a shit??"

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by digesthisickness View Post
    one year, i decided to have a yard sale, and filled tables with books that i knew damn well i'd never read again. they weren't 'up to snuff' information or credibility-wise. then as people started buying them, i panicked and ended up taking them all back inside. why? two reasons. one was a nagging suspicion that they wouldn't really appreciate them properly and secondly... "just in case"
    Late yesterday my ISFJ wife was doing triage on our storage closet, which (being one big-ass closet) has one 8x16-foot wall covered with bookshelves, which are full. Many of these are relics from the time I worked at TAB books, and include such titles as Kitplane Construction, Stitch-and-Glue Boatbuilding, The TAB Circuit Encyclopedias (hardcover, large format, volumes One through Seven), Sand Casting with Copper and Brass, and Rebuilding Ford Flathead V-8s. I've got a number of titles on application software which I edited myself.

    And here's my wife standing there holding Concrete Construction for the Homebuilder and telling me "We've moved this book three times and you've never read it. Why should we keep it?" and I've got this feeling like invisible spiders are crawling all over me. I want to say "This closet was standing here with its door shut, not bothering anybody, and it's been fine for ten years. Why do you have to fix it if it isn't broke?!?"

    Of course, the truth is that the closet has been bothering someone, namely my ISFJ wife, and she's just been too patient to say anything.

    [sigh]

    I really may one day rebuild a Ford flathead V-8, you know.

  9. #59
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by digesthisickness View Post
    me too. and my immediate thought then, and still is, is "how can someone NOT want to?!?"
    They are completely insane. I don't know why they are so sick. They need help.

    i've read dictionaries
    People make fun of me for doing that, then complain about me winning Scrabble and Quiddler because I know words people have never heard of. "Listen, maybe if you REALLY cared to win, you'd crack open the Webster's once in awhile too...?"

    Actually, the winning is extra. The learning is what counts! *cough*

    DSMs
    Gawd, I forget how much money I shelled out for my hardback DSM-IV on half.com.

    but you did cause me to realize i need a book shelf in my bathroom.
    Then my work here is done! Ha!

    right now, i've got my crime library encyclopedias, please understand me II, a few other psyche books, and about forty of my archie comics in there...
    Crime library, wheee! (Let's all read three books on why Scott Peterson murdered his wife and everyone knows he is a cold-blooded amoral killer, and why some other numbnut insists he is completely innocent...) You can call it the "Albert Fish Memorial Bathroom Library."

    (and good god, i'd like to read all of that)
    Beg, and perhaps I shall be nice.

    one year, i decided to have a yard sale, and filled tables with books that i knew damn well i'd never read again. they weren't 'up to snuff' information or credibility-wise. then as people started buying them, i panicked and ended up taking them all back inside. why? two reasons. one was a nagging suspicion that they wouldn't really appreciate them properly and secondly... "just in case"
    No comment. <mumbles to herself>

    sounds like a sickness.
    But it's such a GOOOOD sickness...!


    when they start describing a bush that has absolutely nothing to do with the story line, but is meant to make me feel like i'm 'there', then i skip, skip, skip, until i get to the relevant part again while mumbling, "fucking BUSH... who gives a shit??"
    I find myself doing that without realizing it -- usually it's a matter of skipping over the two pages of city biography or other plot-unrelated information meant to establish setting. (Or the entire chapter "The Muster of Rohan" in Tolkien's "Return of the King," for example.)

    It really bumps up my pph (page per hour) ratio.

    Quote Originally Posted by oberon67 View Post
    Late yesterday my ISFJ wife was doing triage on our storage closet, which (being one big-ass closet) has one 8x16-foot wall covered with bookshelves, which are full. Many of these are relics from the time I worked at TAB books, and include such titles as Kitplane Construction, Stitch-and-Glue Boatbuilding, The TAB Circuit Encyclopedias (hardcover, large format, volumes One through Seven), Sand Casting with Copper and Brass, and Rebuilding Ford Flathead V-8s. I've got a number of titles on application software which I edited myself.
    Thank you for reminding me I need to purge the waterlogged bookshelf in the basement.

    ("It Is Time! Time! TIME!" And the giant stood up...)

    And here's my wife standing there holding Concrete Construction for the Homebuilder and telling me "We've moved this book three times and you've never read it. Why should we keep it?"
    Titania never really did understand the value of books except as door stops and furniture props. (But she bakes a mean wheat germ brownie! ...At least, they were always mean to me...grimace.)

    I've got this feeling like invisible spiders are crawling all over me. I want to say "This closet was standing here with its door shut, not bothering anybody, and it's been fine for ten years. Why do you have to fix it if it isn't broke?!?"
    It is hard when reality crawls all over your body with tiny spider-creepy-crawley appendages, isn't it?

    I really may one day rebuild a Ford flathead V-8, you know.
    Oh, I believe you. [That one day you MAY rebuild one.]

    Right after that book about Web Resources you and I try to sell once upon a time finally gets published. ("After all, it isn't a matter of if, but when...!") What was the name of our little collective: "Audacity R Us?"

    *poke poke*
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  10. #60
    Oberon
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    Oh, ouch!

    If you hadn't left the pursuit of the publishing company to me, it might have actually worked out, too.

    I still remember, like six months had passed, and I finally called the company back to talk to their acq ed, and my old contact had left the company and somebdoy new had taken over, and our project was out the door.

    Makes me very disgusted, both with the company and with me.

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