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  1. #11
    seor member colmena's Avatar
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    It's a little bit ooohh, it's a little bit aahhhh.
    http://badges.mypersonality.info/badge/0/6/68764.png
    Ti Ne Fi Ni

    -How beautiful, this pale Endymion hour.
    -What are you talking about?
    -Endymion, my dear. A beautiful youth possessed by the moon.
    -Well, forget about him and get to bed.
    -Yes, my dear.

  2. #12
    Senior Member bluebell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Liquid_Laser View Post
    I don't tend to have any problems with ExFP's. IxFP's are another story though. When I talk to them it feels like I am navigating a mine field. I never know when I am going to say something that will make them blow up at me. IxFP's have a million strongly felt personal values, and you have no warning as to when you are going to violate one until after you have already done it. The other possible outcome is that you seriously pissed them off, but they never let you know it. Either way you're screwed. With Fe types at least you know where you stand with them, because they tend to wear their heart on their sleeve. With Fi you'll never know until it's too late.
    I've found that I can usually work out the values systems of IxFPs if I spend enough time with them IRL. Then I can (mostly) avoid the mine fields. It's harder to do online though, I think. I find it harder to pick Fe-dom values - for some reason I find it easier to work out what makes introverts tick. I haven't worked out yet how to reliably decode extraverts, particularly Fe-extraverts.
    ...so much smoke pouring out of each chromosome.

  3. #13
    Senior Member Sunshine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nemo View Post
    Fi is pretty subtle.

    It's one of the "perceptual" decision making processes (along with Ti), which means it's good at making decisions in the middle of massive, nonlinear hits of unstructured information (Te and Fe need their info structured to deal with it).

    But unlike Ti, it's more personalized; it encourages a personal relationship with the evolving information. But a prerequisite for any personal relationship is prior experience to determine what's acceptable or not.

    An *extremely* simple-minded example of how Fi works is cooking. Say you're making sauce. You need to taste your sauce as you're cooking it and add whatever ingredients you need to make it taste "good". There's no way to structure that kind of information spontaneously, and Fi and Ti don't need to.

    Even though you might say that you're taking in the information via S, you're making decisions on the fly in terms of what will make the sauce "good" or "bad". You need to personally know the difference between good and bad beforehand via prior experience. And you need to know it in your bones. Ti lacks this personal relationship in deciding what to do with sense-impressions, so, to Ti, the terms "good" and "bad" are meaningless in this context.

    But Fi naturally discriminates between "good" and "bad" like that -- in terms of personal experience. It strikes other types as odd because, since it's perceptual, it's nonverbal, receptive, and guided by perceptions it can't quite explain. And on a much larger scale than cooking sauces, it derives its principles from prior experience of being human.

    An added benefit of being perceptual (Fi/Ti) as that it doesn't need to take things apart so finely; Fi has the capacity to see things as a whole, apart from the assumptions we've been socialized into accepting. It can then reason wholistically to determine the integrity of our actions. Fe has a stronger emphasis on the prevailing social norms, and thus has a harder time providing this kind of wholistic decision-making.

    But a negative is that it's very hard to express the nonlinear/nonverbal machinations of Fi's decision-making process. Combined with the emphasis on what's personally good or bad in terms of fundamental human values, this difficulty to clearly and linearly lay out one's line of reasoning to others can be interpreted as being dogmatic and polar, and their deeply-held human values aren't always self-evident to other people.

    On the other hand, the emphasis on personalizing perceptions gives Fi a remarkably strong point of reference. Take a tragic play, for example. The emotional impact and meaning of the play are entirely dependent on whether or not we have a strong inner reference shaped by the experience of being human -- the kind that bypasses all the social constructs and strikes on what is essentially human. This gives people who use Fi an amazing amount of empathy.

    I think others are bothered by Fi because it can appear so dogmatically certain about things that strike others as relative -- concepts like "good" and "bad" -- yet it has difficulty expressing its justification.

    That's how I understand it anyway.
    Thank you.
    "To find beauty in loss, hope in darkness."

  4. #14
    Senior Member prplchknz's Avatar
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    what is this misconception, of if you insult me I'll blow up? not likely to happen, I do have control over my emotions believe or not. It takes a lot to get me angry, trust me I have non INFP friends who get more pissed about what someone says then I ever do. Words don't bother me. Now actions that involve harming someone do, talking about those actions probably won't bother me but doing such a thing would.

    maybe I'm not an INFP, because I am not oooh so sensitive, I'm kinda tired of this misconception of Fs are weak and we cry when we see a car wreck and Ts are cold they feel nothing.
    In no likes experiment.

    that is all

    i dunno what else to say so

  5. #15
    Oberon
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    I am so blind to my own emotional state that I actually have depended on feedback from others to tell me how I'm feeling.

    A former boss once told me "I can tell you're not happy." And when I thought about it I realized he was right, but I didn't know it up until then. I've seen myself throw things (extremely rare) and observed internally "Hey, I must be angry."

    So, while my internal emotional climate certainly influences my behavior and probably influences my decisions, it does so while taking a complete and total detour around cognition.

  6. #16
    Striving for balance Little Linguist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oberon View Post
    I am so blind to my own emotional state that I actually have depended on feedback from others to tell me how I'm feeling.

    A former boss once told me "I can tell you're not happy." And when I thought about it I realized he was right, but I didn't know it up until then. I've seen myself throw things (extremely rare) and observed internally "Hey, I must be angry."

    So, while my internal emotional climate certainly influences my behavior and probably influences my decisions, it does so while taking a complete and total detour around cognition.
    This is really interesting!!!
    If you are interested in language, words, linguistics, or foreign languages, check out my blog and read, post, and/or share.

  7. #17
    Don't Judge Me! Haphazard's Avatar
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    I've found the Fi of an ETJ much more frightening than that of an IFP, honestly.
    -Carefully taking sips from the Fire Hose of Knowledge

  8. #18
    RETIRED CzeCze's Avatar
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    ^^ Interesting. Could you explain?
    “If you want to tell people the truth, make them laugh, otherwise they'll kill you.” ― Oscar Wilde

    "I'm outtie 5000" ― Romulux

    Johari/Nohari

  9. #19
    Don't Judge Me! Haphazard's Avatar
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    What happens... is it's like, their conviction is just as strong, but they haven't thought through these values very much, and decide that winning is crushing their opponents rather than convincing them to turn to the light side.

    Sometimes IFPs can get like this, but it's more common to ETJs. Like... if you look at news shows, if there's somebody yelling over the other guy about WHAT IS RIIIIGHT!!!! while what seems to come out of their mouth is utter nonsense, they're probably an ETJ.
    -Carefully taking sips from the Fire Hose of Knowledge

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by prplchknz View Post
    what is this misconception, of if you insult me I'll blow up? not likely to happen, I do have control over my emotions believe or not. It takes a lot to get me angry, trust me I have non INFP friends who get more pissed about what someone says then I ever do. Words don't bother me. Now actions that involve harming someone do, talking about those actions probably won't bother me but doing such a thing would.

    maybe I'm not an INFP, because I am not oooh so sensitive, I'm kinda tired of this misconception of Fs are weak and we cry when we see a car wreck and Ts are cold they feel nothing.
    Same here.

    Someone would really have to try hard to "violate my personal values". I think it might be because none of my values have anything to do with other people, they can act how they want.

    I try to avoid becoming passionate or emotional in any way, as it's in these states I'll find it hardest to follow my values. As a result, I only ever allow my emotions free reign in a controlled enviroment.

    For me, I think Fi is what keeps me constantly checking for consistency with values, every action, thought, and state of mind is checked to see if it is in line with the system. Thus I constantly reshape myself and try and move closer to the ideal image I've made. These feelings and values are intense, mystical and what not, but that's all I can really express clearly about the subjective side to them

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