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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by logan235711 View Post
    yep yep extremes, moderation, comfort in self
    Oops. You caught me before an edit. I changed "moderation" to "growing up."



    FL

  2. #12
    Senior Member logan235711's Avatar
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    what is your main difference between the two other than growing up encompassing more than just moderation? or maybe that's all it really is? :o

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by logan235711 View Post
    what is your main difference between the two other than growing up encompassing more than just moderation? or maybe that's all it really is? :o
    That would be a good subject for a general thread.

    In the case of people with HPD, I once read a long description that said HPD sufferers mainly just need to be induced to "grow up." So I wanted my post to reflect a strong emphasis on that. But since excess is such a big part of that particular disorder, I would guess that for HPD sufferers the concept of "growing up" is closely tied to the concept of practicing moderation.

    But for the general population? I don't know. I tend to think that the 16 personality types essentially constitute 16 different types of immaturity when taken to extremes. One could argue that the phrase "taken to extremes" implies that moderation of some habit (or perhaps moderation of an outlook) would be a big part of their process of growing up.

    Good question.

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  4. #14
    Senior Member JivinJeffJones's Avatar
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    Last edited by JivinJeffJones; 09-13-2007 at 02:28 PM.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by JivinJeffJones View Post
    That's a great profile. I now thoroughly wish I were something else.
    Meet a ISTJ. We can help.
    "Man is not made for defeat. A man can be destroyed but not defeated."
    - Ernest Hemingway

  6. #16
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    Last edited by JivinJeffJones; 09-13-2007 at 02:28 PM.

  7. #17
    ✿ڿڰۣஇღ♥ wut ♥ღஇڿڰۣ✿ digesthisickness's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JivinJeffJones View Post
    That's a pretty extreme solution dude. I was thinking more along the lines of joining the army or self-harm or suicide. Thanks anyway.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by JivinJeffJones View Post
    That's a pretty extreme solution dude. I was thinking more along the lines of joining the army or self-harm or suicide. Thanks anyway.
    Now I really think you need to be straightened up.

    Talking about suicide self-harm and other craps… how typical of INFP.

    I’ll kick your ass if I meet you.




    "Man is not made for defeat. A man can be destroyed but not defeated."
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  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tayshaun View Post
    Keirsey, in PUMII, in his paragraphs describing Healers [INFP], says the following:

    "Healers find it difficult to believe in themselves and to trust themselves. Deeply committed to the positive and the good, yet taught to believe there is evil in them, they can come to develop a certain fascination with the problem of good and evil, sacred and profane. They are drawn toward purity, but can become engrossed with sin, continuously on the lookout for the wickedness that lurks within them. Then, when they believe they have yielded to an impure temptation, they may be given to acts of self-sacrifice in atonement. Others seldom detect this inner turmoil, however, for the struggle between good and evil is within the INFP, who does not feel compelled to make the issue public."

    a little further, about mating, conveying the same idea:

    "INFPs cling to their dreams, and often find it difficult to reconcile a romantic, idealized concept of conjugal life with the realities of everyday living with another person. Even at the best of times, they seem fearful of too much marital bliss, afraid that current happiness may have to be paid for with later sacrifices. The devil is sure to get his due if one experiences too freely of happiness, or, for that matter, of success, or beauty, or wealth, or knowledge."

    What do you think about these statements?
    i don't like this description. the long one posted below the OP seems more accurate to me, but only as to the bad side of infp-ness. there is a good side too...

    i don't think in terms of good and evil at all but i do have incredibly high standards for myself as a person, which i am always falling short of, and which often makes me feel like a failure, but then i again i always seem to be able to get over it pretty easily too (though this is getting harder as i get older).

    Are you tormented by this inner, private, Manichean conflict?
    no, it's just how it is--you just make do because it is all you know.

    Is the image of the guardian angel popping over one shoulder and the inner-devil over the other appropriate?
    not so much, no. i think an albatross would be more appropriate :-)

    After a break-up do you often feel like you deserve to suffer?
    hhmmm...well, sort of, i guess... but --it is not so much that i feel i deserve to suffer but that i accept that i will suffer despite what i deserve or not.

    i don't really believe in the concept of "deserves/does not deserve"--it doesn't seem to have very much to do with reaility...
    Last edited by Meursault; 06-01-2007 at 11:54 PM. Reason: fixed quote

  10. #20
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    Does anyone notice how every description of INFP sounds like the it's most "dreamy" of the types? Their descriptions always seem more spiritual than any other types. Almost every description I've seen of them comments on what beautiful writers they are.

    Sure it's true for some, but I think it's just as possible for them to be beautiful painters or drawers. There is nothing in the INFP's functions that makes them devoid of the visual/spatial abilities normally attributed to ISFP.

    The point is that both verbal and spatial abilities can be both abstract or concrete.

    The only difference I see is that an ISFP's artwork and writing will be more based on direct observations and concrete experience -- more of a "slice of life"-type deal -- while INFP's artwork and writing will be more fantasy oriented.

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