User Tag List

First 12

Results 11 to 15 of 15

  1. #11
    Senior Member Chiharu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    MBTI
    ENFP
    Enneagram
    7w6 sx/so
    Socionics
    ENFp None
    Posts
    681

    Default

    That makes sense to me. I have a fairly good idea of where my strengths and weaknesses lie, and even at my lowest i can find good qualities about myself. My IxTP just collapses under a general sense of worthlessness.
    Be soft. Do not let the world make you hard. Do not let pain make you hate. Do not let the bitterness steal your sweetness." ― Kurt Vonnegut

    ENFP. 7w6 – 4w3 – 1w9 sx/so. Aries. Dilettante. Overly anxious optimist.

  2. #12
    Senior Member typologywhore's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    MBTI
    infj
    Enneagram
    4w3 sx/so
    Posts
    125

    Default

    Just read the OP atm, but will go back over other responses in more detail later.

    Quote Originally Posted by Viridian View Post
    Thinking you're not as good as other people, that you're a burden or a bother to them, that you have nothing to offer, etc. Feelings of envy or resentment, as well as depressive states, may follow.
    Basically, then: is this sort of "internalized worthlessness" more common among Fe types than Fi types? Is there no correlation at all and I'm only seeing things?
    ^Uh. Yuh. This, the bolded absolutely. lol~ #awkward

    have recurrent depressive disorder, generalised anxiety &social anxiety (though am slightly ambivalent about the "labelling" of a certain state in this way, because it seems to imply its permanence) ; &this strain of thinking is very common for me. i definitely envy people who are like how i [kinda] aspire to be - look like i wish i looked, are well-known&at the centre of in the social scene/community/group etc i care about. The resentment is there, i thiiiink, but it's not conscious; some superego-esque part of me has decided resentment towards others is "not allowed" or "bad" or something to that effect. &the thoughts about being a bother/inconveniencing people are very common when dealing with other people, especially those i feel i don't know very well. (Interestingly, it's not a problem when i really "click" with someone though; then i'm just completely absorbed in the interaction, and have a sense of equality and connection/unity with the other person/people. Don't experience this nearly as much as i'd like, though, because social anxiety. . _. )

    *slightly painful-to-acknowledge side note (..uh, yay..): a significant amount of this thinking may stem from being trans* [="transgender", as the general population usually knows it as]; thoughts like "no one will ever love me [bc of possessing a non-normative identity/body]", "i'm inferior/worthless [because of not fitting into binary gender roles/because i don't appear in physical terms like the person i (feel i?) am]" have substantial force.

  3. #13
    Senior Member Viridian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    MBTI
    IsFJ
    Posts
    3,088

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by darling devotee View Post
    Just read the OP atm, but will go back over other responses in more detail later.



    ^Uh. Yuh. This, the bolded absolutely. lol~ #awkward

    have recurrent depressive disorder, generalised anxiety &social anxiety (though am slightly ambivalent about the "labelling" of a certain state in this way, because it seems to imply its permanence) ; &this strain of thinking is very common for me. i definitely envy people who are like how i [kinda] aspire to be - look like i wish i looked, are well-known&at the centre of in the social scene/community/group etc i care about. The resentment is there, i thiiiink, but it's not conscious; some superego-esque part of me has decided resentment towards others is "not allowed" or "bad" or something to that effect. &the thoughts about being a bother/inconveniencing people are very common when dealing with other people, especially those i feel i don't know very well. (Interestingly, it's not a problem when i really "click" with someone though; then i'm just completely absorbed in the interaction, and have a sense of equality and connection/unity with the other person/people. Don't experience this nearly as much as i'd like, though, because social anxiety. . _. )

    *slightly painful-to-acknowledge side note (..uh, yay..): a significant amount of this thinking may stem from being trans* [="transgender", as the general population usually knows it as]; thoughts like "no one will ever love me [bc of possessing a non-normative identity/body]", "i'm inferior/worthless [because of not fitting into binary gender roles/because i don't appear in physical terms like the person i (feel i?) am]" have substantial force.
    Ah, yes, of course, my hard-and-fast "rule" could very well be skewed if we include the internalized discrimination of minorities, which is pretty pervasive and sociologically tangled in contrast with my original intent. I didn't assume systematic discrimination as a cause of low self-confidence, 'cuz that's a whole 'nother story, although it might also play into type preferences...
    Tentative typing: ISFJ 6w5 or 9w1 (Sp/S[?]).

  4. #14
    Vaguely Precise Seymour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    5w4 sx/so
    Posts
    1,565

    Default

    I'm been mulling this over, and here's my take:

    I think any type can have an inferiority complex (or suffer from feelings of being inadequate, worthless, etc), but it can look different from the outside. There's a way in which Fi looks proudly ego-centric from other perspectives, but that's not the necessarily the subjective experience.

    Like Ti users who have to think things out for themselves, Fi users have to "feel things out" for themselves. That is, the values and evaluations have to hang together in a coherent or harmonious way (just as for Ti users the logic of things has to hang together). It's not enough for someone just to say that something is good/important/meaningful, an Fi user has to know for themselves (again, parallel with Ti and determining if something is true/correct).

    So, in a certain kind of way, this can come off as a sort of egocentric self-confidence ("Why do you think you are more-moral/smarter/whatever than other people?"). However, that doesn't have much to do with a high self-evaluation of worth or high confidence.

    FPs still suffer if they don't live up to their own values—even when those values aren't shared by others. In fact, an FP may have unreasonably high standards that the surrounding society might (often correctly) dismiss as ridiculous or unworkable. This seems to be a common cause of depression for young NFPs, who may experience a huge gap between their vision and the reality around them. This mismatch can be especially emotionally trying when one's self doesn't measure up and falls far short of how things SHOULD be.

    FJs tend to be more practical and ends-driven (typically in a nurturing kind of way), and have the advantage of that practicality and a tendency to select from the available time-tested and reality-tested values around them. They may take a stand against a particular social practice or value, but they do so with a better grip on the social feasibility (and costs) of their stance.

    Clearly both Fi users and Fe users can think themselves superior, but the Fe version comes across as a nicer sounding "my values of my group/family/organization are the best, and as a member/protector of that group, the group's high, clearly functional values are reflected in me and my actions... don't be selfish and stand against them, you rude disruptive person." The Fi version is more "my individual values are the best, so don't oppress me, you immoral unfeeling person, with society's flawed values/practicalities/logic." In both cases, there can be a blindness to how a big a role self-interest can play in one's actions.

  5. #15
    Senior Member Viridian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    MBTI
    IsFJ
    Posts
    3,088

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Seymour View Post
    I'm been mulling this over, and here's my take:

    I think any type can have an inferiority complex (or suffer from feelings of being inadequate, worthless, etc), but it can look different from the outside. There's a way in which Fi looks proudly ego-centric from other perspectives, but that's not the necessarily the subjective experience.

    Like Ti users who have to think things out for themselves, Fi users have to "feel things out" for themselves. That is, the values and evaluations have to hang together in a coherent or harmonious way (just as for Ti users the logic of things has to hang together). It's not enough for someone just to say that something is good/important/meaningful, an Fi user has to know for themselves (again, parallel with Ti and determining if something is true/correct).

    So, in a certain kind of way, this can come off as a sort of egocentric self-confidence ("Why do you think you are more-moral/smarter/whatever than other people?"). However, that doesn't have much to do with a high self-evaluation of worth or high confidence.

    FPs still suffer if they don't live up to their own values—even when those values aren't shared by others. In fact, an FP may have unreasonably high standards that the surrounding society might (often correctly) dismiss as ridiculous or unworkable. This seems to be a common cause of depression for young NFPs, who may experience a huge gap between their vision and the reality around them. This mismatch can be especially emotionally trying when one's self doesn't measure up and falls far short of how things SHOULD be.

    FJs tend to be more practical and ends-driven (typically in a nurturing kind of way), and have the advantage of that practicality and a tendency to select from the available time-tested and reality-tested values around them. They may take a stand against a particular social practice or value, but they do so with a better grip on the social feasibility (and costs) of their stance.

    Clearly both Fi users and Fe users can think themselves superior, but the Fe version comes across as a nicer sounding "my values of my group/family/organization are the best, and as a member/protector of that group, the group's high, clearly functional values are reflected in me and my actions... don't be selfish and stand against them, you rude disruptive person." The Fi version is more "my individual values are the best, so don't oppress me, you immoral unfeeling person, with society's flawed values/practicalities/logic." In both cases, there can be a blindness to how a big a role self-interest can play in one's actions.
    I think you articulated the issues I was aiming at very well here! Maybe the phrase "inferiority complex" is somewhat dicey here, I'll admit - I wasn't able to think of any other way to put it, basically. The idea I was going for was the FPs - or Fi users as a whole - being more trusting of their "inner compass" even when depressed or distraugh, while FJs would be mistrustful or ashamed of their own feelings or values - or just plain not being able to discern them - and thus prone to latch unto external ones, which was more along the lines of what I saw as low self-esteem. I admit I'm biased here. ^^;

    Alos, I apologize if I implied FPs were "ego-centric". Love you guys.
    Tentative typing: ISFJ 6w5 or 9w1 (Sp/S[?]).

Similar Threads

  1. Type and Inferiority Complexes
    By Orangey in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 12-04-2012, 09:04 PM
  2. Fe/Fi and the desire to improve empathy and social abilities?
    By TenebrousReflection in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 12-26-2011, 03:01 PM
  3. [NF] Fi and Fe: Trying to Understand and Illustrate the Difference (in my head)
    By VagrantFarce in forum The NF Idyllic (ENFP, INFP, ENFJ, INFJ)
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 02-24-2010, 12:38 AM
  4. The Mid-life Crisis and Inferior Fi
    By Quinlan in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-21-2009, 05:26 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO