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  1. #51
    Uniqueorn William K's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adasta View Post
    I have been told countless times in my life that I make people feel secure. I do absolutely nothing to engender this belief in others, they just have it. Something about me (us?) is calming to others. Perhaps ironic because some of the times I've been told I appear calm are the times when I am absolutely bricking it.
    We're human whisperers?

    But I can understand what you mean about looking calm outside. There have been times at work where my colleagues would comment that I'm so graceful under pressure when inside I'm like absolutely roiling with thoughts and feelings.
    4w5, Fi>Ne>Ti>Si>Ni>Fe>Te>Se, sp > so > sx

    appreciates being appreciated, conflicted over conflicts, afraid of being afraid, bad at being bad, predictably unpredictable, consistently inconsistent, remarkably unremarkable...

    I may not agree with what you are feeling, but I will defend to death your right to have a good cry over it

    The whole problem with the world is that fools & fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts. ~ Bertrand Russell

  2. #52
    Uniqueorn William K's Avatar
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    To answer the OP, not sure if it is considered practical but you could find an outlet to show your rich inner world to the outside. This could be in some form of creative arts (and no, commenting and starting threads on TypoC doesn't count as work ). Even a run-of-the-mill 9-to-5 job could give you pleasure if you know what your strengths/passions are and how to apply it in the right situations.

    And I don't know where this stereotype of an INFP who forgets to pay the bills comes from. Yes, we may get into a zone when we are doing something we deem important and lose track of time, but it's really not difficult to set up automatic bill paying with your e-bank account

    Oh, and I can vouch for life getting easier as we get older. It's as if we live life in reverse. We hit the mid-life and existential crises so early in life that by the time we survive to the 30s, anything else that can be thrown at us would seem like a piece of cake.
    4w5, Fi>Ne>Ti>Si>Ni>Fe>Te>Se, sp > so > sx

    appreciates being appreciated, conflicted over conflicts, afraid of being afraid, bad at being bad, predictably unpredictable, consistently inconsistent, remarkably unremarkable...

    I may not agree with what you are feeling, but I will defend to death your right to have a good cry over it

    The whole problem with the world is that fools & fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts. ~ Bertrand Russell

  3. #53
    You have a choice! 21%'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by William K View Post
    Oh, and I can vouch for life getting easier as we get older. It's as if we live life in reverse. We hit the mid-life and existential crises so early in life that by the time we survive to the 30s, anything else that can be thrown at us would seem like a piece of cake.
    Nice to know!
    4w5 sp/sx EII

  4. #54
    Senior Member flameskull95's Avatar
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    I guess what personality type doesn't assure you with are your talents, level of knowledge, or level of thinking or feeling. It's practically just the type of reactions you give life to. I'm def INFP, but I've been considered overly-orderly at times with my work... - in my case it gets work done faster and easier for later. But that's maybe because I'm inclined to be more of an INXP, - I don't know where it came about, but It's probably 'cause I'm a guy who was raised by academics. And yes, INFP girls are called 'lots of fun' while us INFP guys are usually called 'fags'/'weirdos'/'retards' or just 'crazy', I guess that can also be a root of INXPness. By just being an INFP, you're INXP because of they guy standards society imposes on you, most societies more than the rest, and every society is practically dominated by STs, so go figure.

    The 'practical purpose' I guess is created when we apply our ideals(which is like our life blood) to the real world, and make an effort out of our lives in doing so. I guess an INFP can amount to any practical purpose they set their minds to when they understand the futility of anxiety, organization/thinking & getting work done to some extent, which would be obstacles in the way of applying our ideals. When INFPs are stressed out, they reflect ESTJs the most practical, down to earth of extroverted types, so that goes to show INFPs can be practical, - and when they rarely are, they are the best at it. But OVERALL, I don't think all us INFPs have one practical purpose, but just traits that can incline us toward, in SOME WAY relative purposes. And it's usually through our ideals.
    I'm a INFP - The sociopath

    I think I'm either a 4w5, 4w3, 6w5 or 9w1. Most possibly 4w5.

    Feeling FiNe

  5. #55
    Senior Member flameskull95's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qlip View Post
    They make good trophies. Only the upper class can afford to own and maintain such an impractical thing as an INFP.
    Very untrue when it comes to the underlying meaning. INFPs are usually much less materialistic than other types and would be happy growing in any environment that is just understanding of them(which even in primitive societies is possible), and are more likely to reject materialistic qualities and upper class comfort at the sake of others(which is usually the case with the upperclass).

    Other than that, - 'ENFP' hey? Shouldn't you be somewhere trying your best to 'fit in' instead of creating a stir?
    I'm a INFP - The sociopath

    I think I'm either a 4w5, 4w3, 6w5 or 9w1. Most possibly 4w5.

    Feeling FiNe

  6. #56
    Post Human Post Qlip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by flameskull95 View Post
    Very untrue when it comes to the underlying meaning. INFPs are usually much less materialistic than other types and would be happy growing in any environment that is just understanding of them(which even in primitive societies is possible), and are more likely to reject materialistic qualities and upper class comfort at the sake of others(which is usually the case with the upperclass).

    Other than that, - 'ENFP' hey? Shouldn't you be somewhere trying your best to 'fit in' instead of creating a stir?
    It was a playful joke on the premise that people have to be 'good for something' for someone to justify their existence. Everybody else seemed to get it.

    Why don't you put a lid on that ENFP hate and save it for sometime where I truly mean to offend you.

    EDIT: Okay... overreaction there, but I will leave it for posterity.

  7. #57
    Senior Member flameskull95's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qlip View Post
    It was a playful joke on the premise that people have to be 'good for something' for someone to justify their existence. Everybody else seemed to get it.

    Why don't you put a lid on that ENFP hate and save it for sometime where I truly mean to offend you.

    EDIT: Okay... overreaction there, but I will leave it for posterity.
    ENFP hate? nah, that's my INTP counterpart kicking in. Most my friends are usually ENFPs, other than that... are you supposed to 'get it' when I contradict something, you were totally trolling on, only to lead the joke to a sad position.... didn't think so.
    I'm a INFP - The sociopath

    I think I'm either a 4w5, 4w3, 6w5 or 9w1. Most possibly 4w5.

    Feeling FiNe

  8. #58
    Post Human Post Qlip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by flameskull95 View Post
    ENFP hate? nah, that's my INTP counterpart kicking in. Most my friends are usually ENFPs, other than that... are you supposed to 'get it' when I contradict something, you were totally trolling on, only to lead the joke to a sad position.... didn't think so.
    Hmm, I haven't seen you around. Welcome to the forum. I believe our Fi's have already met. :wave:

  9. #59
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    I read this tonight and had another "aha!" kind of moment. I just read this book too and I am gratified to see that the author is some kind of crazy NF as well.

    If you ask my husband my best trait, he’ll smile and say, “She never gives up.” But if you ask him my worst trait, he’ll get a funny tic in his cheek, narrow his eyes and hiss, “She. Never. Gives. Up.”

    It took me a year and a half to write my earliest version of The Help. I’d told most of my friends and family what I was working on. Why not? We are compelled to talk about our passions. When I’d polished my story, I announced it was done and mailed it to a literary agent.

    Six weeks later, I received a rejection letter from the agent, stating, “Story did not sustain my interest.” I was thrilled! I called my friends and told them I’d gotten my first rejection! Right away, I went back to editing. I was sure I could make the story tenser, more riveting, better.

    A few months later, I sent it to a few more agents. And received a few more rejections. Well, more like 15. I was a little less giddy this time, but I kept my chin up. “Maybe the next book will be the one,” a friend said. Next book? I wasn’t about to move on to the next one just because of a few stupid letters. I wanted to write this book.

    A year and a half later, I opened my 40th rejection: “There is no market for this kind of tiring writing.” That one finally made me cry. “You have so much resolve, Kathryn,” a friend said to me. “How do you keep yourself from feeling like this has been just a huge waste of your time?”

    That was a hard weekend. I spent it in pajamas, slothing around that racetrack of self-pity—you know the one, from sofa to chair to bed to refrigerator, starting over again on the sofa. But I couldn’t let go of The Help. Call it tenacity, call it resolve or call it what my husband calls it: stubbornness.

    After rejection number 40, I started lying to my friends about what I did on the weekends. They were amazed by how many times a person could repaint her apartment. The truth was, I was embarrassed for my friends and family to know I was still working on the same story, the one nobody apparently wanted to read.

    Sometimes I’d go to literary conferences, just to be around other writers trying to get published. I’d inevitably meet some successful writer who’d tell me, “Just keep at it. I received 14 rejections before I finally got an agent. Fourteen. How many have you gotten?”

    By rejection number 45, I was truly neurotic. It was all I could think about—revising the book, making it better, getting an agent, getting it published. I insisted on rewriting the last chapter an hour before I was due at the hospital to give birth to my daughter. I would not go to the hospital until I’d typed The End. I was still poring over my research in my hospital room when the nurse looked at me like I wasn’t human and said in a New Jersey accent, “Put the book down, you nut job—you’re crowning.”

    It got worse. I started lying to my husband. It was as if I were having an affair—with 10 black maids and a skinny white girl. After my daughter was born, I began sneaking off to hotels on the weekends to get in a few hours of writing. I’m off to the Poconos! Off on a girls’ weekend! I’d say. Meanwhile, I’d be at the Comfort Inn around the corner. It was an awful way to act, but—for God’s sake—I could not make myself give up.

    In the end, I received 60 rejections forThe Help. But letter number 61 was the one that accepted me. After my five years of writing and three and a half years of rejection, an agent named Susan Ramer took pity on me. What if I had given up at 15? Or 40? Or even 60? Three weeks later, Susan sold The Help to Amy Einhorn Books.

    The point is, I can’t tell you how to succeed. But I can tell you how not to: Give in to the shame of being rejected and put your manuscript—or painting, song, voice, dance moves, [insert passion here]—in the coffin that is your bedside drawer and close it for good. I guarantee you that it won’t take you anywhere. Or you could do what this writer did: Give in to your obsession instead.

    And if your friends make fun of you for chasing your dream, remember—just lie.
    I liked it all except maybe about the advice for lying. I am so bad at lying, I still wouldn't get away with it because I would feel guilty, twitching with the "tell-tale" heart of it all... until at some point he'd say "Hey honey can you pass the remote?" and I'd start sobbing about what a jerky miss mcjerkface I am.

    In another note, I have started to think about writing!

  10. #60
    Senior Member BAJ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saturned View Post
    I liked it all except maybe about the advice for lying. I am so bad at lying, I still wouldn't get away with it because I would feel guilty, twitching with the "tell-tale" heart of it all... until at some point he'd say "Hey honey can you pass the remote?" and I'd start sobbing about what a jerky miss mcjerkface I am.

    In another note, I have started to think about writing!

    This made me tear up a little because, secretly, I'm one of the greatest artists.

    I went to Wal-Mart before reading this, and I bought numerous art supplies. It occurred to me that I want make my own shirts/ clothing. Not the clothing itself, rather, I'd make a whole bunch of orginal t-shirts, like dozens or hundreds. So I bought various paints and dyes.

    I wonder if this will just sit there like the kiln, which has sat there since last September.

    I also have lots of paint, which only occasionally gets used. Like a few thousand dollars worth of oil and acrylic artist paint.

    But, wow, I stop much quicker than 60 rejections. I need to take some vitamins or something.

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