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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Huxley3112 View Post
    I'm going to bring something up here that I have not seen frequently mentioned in other inferior function writings. Jung claimed that beyond severe stress activating the inferior function.. another way that it can be activated is through the use of mind altering drugs. He said that the inferior function was really meant to remain unconscious, it was myers that focused on being able to develop each of the functions. I wonder if anyone has noticed their inferior at work with any mind altering agents? Its a bit funny to consider.. as I can't recall any LSD trips that turned me into an ESTJ or ISTJ, hahahaha. Actually, now i think about it.. I believe there might have been a pattern of ISTJ defenses kicking in when mind altering agents scared or confused me. Hmmmm. Too bad I won't touch those things with a 10 ft pole any longer... =)
    tis true about the LSD bit. I feel I can step into my Si/Te self when required without any drugs now...

  2. #12
    morose bourgeoisie
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    I tend to handle stress quietly. I simply put off my real gut reactions until the situation has settles down. I believe this is called post truamatic stress reaction.

    Also, the whole thing about INFPs turning into ESTJs when under stress is bullshit. My ENTJ sister barks orders and is mean-spirited when under stress, so what is she turning into? an ISFP? I don't think so. I like some of what Jung wrote, but this theory is largely false.

  3. #13
    reborn PeaceBaby's Avatar
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    I guess I am wondering if you mean acute or chronic stress. I see them as different entities.

    In acute stress I disconnect from emotions by necessity. Things need to get done, and I need to keep it together, so it's like a switch is flipped (not consciously) that places me into a calm and collected focus. Depending on the circumstance, I might feel scared and shocked, and may need a minute for adrenalin to ease off, but I need to act, so I address those feelings as best as I can in the moment (getting a hug wherever I can, eating chocolate, talking to family or friends) but for the most part, how I feel must take a back seat. It's been after the acute situation when I experience the fall-out, because those emotions do not vanish, they are merely banished for a while, and when granted reprieve from exile, they percolate to the surface of my life in a concentrated way. This can manifest as insomnia, anxiety, other physical symptoms such as heart palpitations and panic attacks. I have gotten better at working through this rush of emotional and physical fall-out because I now know it will come, and therefore I can do things like walking, zone-out daydreaming, healthy eating, physical pampering and healthy self-talk to help myself cope with that de-stressing period.

    In a state of minor acute stress, I might add a snippy comment here or there, but for me to "blow up" and spew emotions all over the place, barking orders... very atypical. So while I don't identify with the drill sergeant, I can identify with someone who is coordinating action and making sure that what needs to get done gets done.

    Chronic stress is somewhat different. The first sign for me of things piling up is a bit more crankiness, body tension and restless sleeping, which can turn to insomnia if I continue to try to ignore stuff piling up on me. My remedy here is to write in an effort to unwind all the strands of what's happening in my life contributing to this state, and then put a plan into effect to address those issues as best as I can. Sometimes there is nothing that can be done about one issue or another, and in those cases, I continue to write in an effort to fully explore the emotionality behind where I am and how I feel. If I try to cram my emotions down, they will work harder and harder to get my attention until they cannot be ignored. They refuse to be ignored. The only way out of that is through.


    While I do not feel like I am an ESTJ in these situations, I do identify with finding comfort in Si and recognizing a strong need to take action which I will presumably call Te. Ne - Te at times like this for me is in a hyper-focussed state to try to solve each problem to help enable the body and mind to return to a steady-state of functioning. I try to process the emotions myself without any kind of "lashing out" - which I might add, when an ESTJ is angry, even though it may feel intense it's generally not personal at all as opposed to when a tert or inferior Te user is angry, it is almost always very personally delivered indeed.
    "Remember always that you not only have the right to be an individual, you have an obligation to be one."
    Eleanor Roosevelt


    "When people see some things as beautiful,
    other things become ugly.
    When people see some things as good,
    other things become bad."
    Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching

  4. #14
    Senior Member Chiharu's Avatar
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    I withdraw, get really irritable or melancholy. I feel overwhelmingly guillty, deficient.

    To calm down I make lists. If it's really really really bad I do physical things like cleaning. Particularly scrubbing.

  5. #15
    libtard SJW chickpea's Avatar
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    i either isolate myself and wallow in self pity, or turn into a crazy, vindictive bitch. all depends on the source of the stress.

  6. #16
    ♪♫♪♫♪♫ luminous beam's Avatar
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    If I'm extremely stressed/exhausted/angry the ESTJ shadow self comes out and it ain't pretty. Think "Drag Me To Hell..." lol Okay, maybe not that bad, but pointing in that direction.


  7. #17
    mod love baby... Lady_X's Avatar
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    i clean and organize...i start freaking out about clutter. i want everything in it's place or thrown out....super severe desire to take an eraser to my life and start over.
    There can’t be any large-scale revolution until there’s a personal revolution, on an individual level. It’s got to happen inside first.
    -Jim Morrison

  8. #18
    Sugar Hiccup OrangeAppled's Avatar
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    One of two things happens:

    I become overwhelmed & shut down, withdraw, lay in bed for days, escape into daydream, just completely letting any responsibilities go. At the same time, a part of me is beating myself up for not doing what I know I need to do.

    Or I go into panic mode, become critical of everything, and try to pare things down to the essentials, which can be rash & destructive, as I describe below.

    One thing that almost always happens: I stress eat. I normally eat pretty healthy, but I'll crave & eat a lot of junk, as it's comforting.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lady X View Post
    super severe desire to take an eraser to my life and start over.
    I can relate to this. The desire to make things organized (literally & not so literally) in my life can become destructive. I will throw both physical things out when I am in one of these cleaning rampages, and I'll metaphorically throw out aspects in my life that seem too complicated or not essential. I guess the idea is to de-clutter, simplify, so I can deal with everything & not be so stressed. The problem is my judgment becomes so critical that I will toss things out which later I regret, because they actually had some significance. It feels easier to destroy stuff or get rid of it & start over than to try & improve what already exists, and the panic moves me to do what gives instant gratification in the form of stress-relief.
    Often a star was waiting for you to notice it. A wave rolled toward you out of the distant past, or as you walked under an open window, a violin yielded itself to your hearing. All this was mission. But could you accomplish it? (Rilke)

    INFP | 4w5 sp/sx | RLUEI - Primary Inquisitive | Tritype is tripe

  9. #19
    Senior Member Synapse's Avatar
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    How do I deal with stress, why glad you asked, like Russian roulette.

  10. #20
    Vaguely Precise Seymour's Avatar
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    I react much like PeaceBaby describes. Under acute stress I put my emotions aside, am generally calm, collected and purposeful until there is time to do emotional processing and freak out after the fact.

    Under chronic stress, I get grumpy and tend to withdraw from other aspects of life in order to conserve and focus my energy. Eventually I have to stop and picked up the dropped strands of my life, even if the stress is ongoing.

    I wouldn't say I feel particularly ESTJ-like at any point. I do sometimes use being in an irritated or frustrated state to do cleaning or culling of clutter, since it goes more quickly when I'm in a more draconian mood. Sometimes that very much a conscious choice to put my frustrated energy to good use.

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