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View Poll Results: NFs, would you marry an atheist?

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  • NO - I'm an INFJ

    10 8.26%
  • NO - I'm an ENFJ

    4 3.31%
  • NO - I'm an INFP

    9 7.44%
  • NO - I'm an ENFP

    9 7.44%
  • YES - I'm an INFJ

    27 22.31%
  • YES - I'm an ENFJ

    7 5.79%
  • YES - I'm an INFP

    32 26.45%
  • YES - I'm an ENFP

    23 19.01%
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  1. #51
    Senior Member Santosha's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EcK View Post
    The green bit: I absolutly agree. I believe most actually smart atheists do it more in reaction to\to create a counterweight to the positive claims of religion. In terms of PR if someone claims A and the other doesn't claim anything people will have a tendency to believe A by default.

    the brown bit: while I agree that all data has to be considered I think you probably select the bits you want to believe in. So far noone of these studies have any kind of results they were able to reproduce and contain so much procedural misteps biasing the data that it isn't even funny. There's one interesting experiment about esp done recently but it hasn't been reproduced yet though. here's a link, enjoy

    Also if you claim that studies are made looking into the 'paranormal' (i disagree with this terminology as all that is observed is part of the natural world, otherwise we wouldnt be able to observe it) and use it to point at the narrow mindedness of other people, how can you then claim that relying on logic and empirical data is suddently not the method to go by


    You're not a judge and atheism isn't illegal


    That's no more correlated with atheism than being an idiot is correlated with being human. Significant but not particularily so once you normalize the data with the witness sample. (I.E. People in general)
    I think that vision of the 'reedeeming atheist' is probably more of an urban legend than anything else by the way. I always hear religious types talk about it but I have yet to see it happen or see any data backing it up. If anyone has any study on the topic it'd be cool.


    Yes, that's how I meant by double standards. Check the methodology of the studies you refer to before saying things like this please.


    So, basically based on this I could claim anything as being true with no evidence. Unicorns and the Sauron and rings of power. Empirical evidence is something we use because it's testable and reliable. You don't believe in fairy tales BECAUSE of empirical evidence (i hope) so why does religion makes exception to that rule?


    And what is your alternative by the way?
    You need a kind of frame to think. Also People aren't absolutly rational, there's nothing rational about empathy for example, it's just a fact of human nature. But as a fact it can be assessed logically. It's not perfect but it works better than unreliable methods based exclusively on internalized states that translate badly in language. And if you can't communicate something you can't reliably test it. That's all well and good if you're talking about someone feeling happy, not if its about something with clear consequences for the 'outside' universe, such as the existence or not of unicorns, gods or ghosts.


    Yes, I don't know the guy, but generally the 'void' etc people talk about when talking about the absence of the belief in a god is something that only seem to bother atheist in the imagination of theists. I'm sure there are exception but anecdotal evidence is no proof.


    Yes, again, there is absolutly no more data to back that up than there is to back up fairies, and I'll remind you that you seemed to welcome empirical evidence when it fits your views, that's not reason but selective delusion.
    While this doesn't make your claim untrue it makes them into one possibility among at least 10 to the power of a hundred (far more than there is atoms in the universe) and then some with absolutly no reason to prefer your theory than there is to believe in any other fancy of the imagination. And that sort of claim to me take such utter disregard for other people or even bothering to back up one's view that it dwarves the narrow mindedness of hardcore atheists.
    Let me get back to you on this Eck. I'm heading to get a cold, wet, sparkley diet rockstar. I think some of what I've said has been taken out of context. Responce coming =)
    Man suffers only because he takes seriously what the gods made for fun - Watts

  2. #52
    Senior Member Santosha's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EcK View Post
    ANd you claim that something happens after one's death based on absolutly no evidence of any kind, selectively discard empirical evidence and logic and then use empirical evidence in a counter example, offer absolutly no other alternatives than your own unjustified beliefs and complete disregard for other people's viewpoint and yet call an atheist who at least has some kind of data to back their claims up as narrow minded only succeeding in showing how much, much more narrow minded and arrogant you are
    No. I don't claim anything is coming. I'm agnostic, and think everyone probably is. I believe the atheists are as bad as the theists.. taking a stance on something unknown. Atleast the agnostics KNOW they dont KNOW.
    Man suffers only because he takes seriously what the gods made for fun - Watts

  3. #53
    4x9 cascadeco's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Huxley3112 View Post
    Let me clarify.. The Atheist I was referring to is the atheist that believes NOTHING exists after death. Nothing. Not god, heaven, diety, energy change. You cease to exist in any form.
    Ok, there are people who think that. What are you trying to clarify?

    Actually I think that's quite possible. But I'm not in a position to KNOW that, nor am I in a position to know something else will happen. I have quite a number of reasons why I would reject a few of those notions. though.

    I often think though that most people are spiritual or religious due to this topic alone - the discomfort that there might actually not be anything post-death.

    Also, tying to some of Marm's comments, I can say I'm very much at peace and voidless as an agnostic/atheist. And a sidenote - I am also probably the biggest nature-lover/appreciator ever. I find the world/universe beautiful and amazing.
    "...On and on and on and on he strode, far out over the sands, singing wildly to the sea, crying to greet the advent of the life that had cried to him." - James Joyce

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  4. #54
    i love skylights's Avatar
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    an agnostic atheist, sure - i think it would be a little more difficult to sustain a relationship with a "certain" atheist. i tend to dislike dogma of any variety.

    i'm lightly spiritual / agnostic myself, no major convictions besides assuming the existence of something bigger than us, whatever form that may come in. i've been happy in relationships with a liberal protestant christian, an agnostic, and an agnostic atheist-by-belief, jew-by-culture.

    Quote Originally Posted by BAJ View Post
    I even went to Unitarian Universalist, and they seemed a little bit too militant to me...too intolerant...too argumentative. I'm hoping that the one service I attended what not representative. At least they weren't adamant in the God or no-God area, however.
    oh, yuck. i attended a great UU church for a while. they were really chill and open. sorry you had a bad experience with it

  5. #55
    Senior Member Virulence's Avatar
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    I'm agnostic with a pretty strong sense of spirituality.

    An atheist who was insistent on shoving "THERE IS NO GOD AND YOU'RE DUMB IF YOU THINK THERE IS" down people's throats? No.

    An atheist more with an attitude of, "I don't believe in a higher power or have an interest in organized religion at all, but I don't really care if anyone else does," yes.

    It's more related to wanting to be with someone who respects others and doesn't treat them poorly for silly reasons than taking any issue with atheism, though.
    I believe in make believe.

  6. #56
    Certified Sausage Smoker Elfboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicodemus View Post
    Any religion?
    any religion (or more importantly, any branch of a religion) that has some sort of strong core values. naturally, my biased response is to say that christianity teaches the best values, but there are other religions out there who teach perfectly good values and I believe they're better off without parents who have some sort of spiritual structure if you will. perhaps that's the mini ISTJ in me coming out

  7. #57
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    I would marry someone who respected my right to my own opinions just as I respected his. I'm fine with anyone who doesn't try to force his beliefs, whether atheist or religious, down my throat.

    That said, it would be easier for me to marry a militant atheist than a religious dogmatist, primarily because God doesn't feature heavily in my personal set of beliefs (although I believe in the existence of God more than not.)

  8. #58
    Senior Member Nicodemus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elfboy View Post
    any religion (or more importantly, any branch of a religion) that has some sort of strong core values. naturally, my biased response is to say that christianity teaches the best values, but there are other religions out there who teach perfectly good values and I believe they're better off without parents who have some sort of spiritual structure if you will. perhaps that's the mini ISTJ in me coming out
    Are there elements beside core values that make religions important?

  9. #59
    Senior Member syndatha's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicodemus View Post
    Are there elements beside core values that make religions important?
    How you perceive the world, for instance

  10. #60
    Cat Wench ReadingRainbows's Avatar
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    I'm a theist, I'd marry another theist. I have no preferences of christian or not. But belief in god is important.
    Quote Originally Posted by EffEmDoubleyou View Post
    St. Stephen took rocks and St. Sebastian took arrows. You only have to take some jerks on an internet forum. Nut up.

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