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  1. #31
    nee andante bechimo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IZthe411 View Post
    But isn't your question about control when you are around others- not when you're alone?
    It's all one big ball of control.

    Shifting perspectives once again. Extroversion. To be recharged by being with other people includes heavy elements of laissez-faire and acceptance of uncontrollable elements. Notice how ESTPs are one of the most if not the most extroverted of extroverts? They're SE dom P-types, very laissez-faire when it comes to acceptance of people in the here and now. No Si or Fi and barely an Ni. Whether they can rhyme like entjs is another story.

  2. #32
    Carerra Lu IZthe411's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Metaphor View Post
    It's all one big ball of control.

    Shifting perspectives once again. Extroversion. To be recharged by being with other people includes heavy elements of laissez-faire and acceptance of uncontrollable elements. Notice how ESTPs are one of the most if not the most extroverted of extroverts? They're SE dom P-types, very laissez-faire when it comes to acceptance of people in the here and now. No Si or Fi and barely an Ni. Whether they can rhyme like entjs is another story.
    I see where you are going. That's an interesting way to spin it.

    @ BOLD You inspire me LOL

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  3. #33
    Away with the fairies Southern Kross's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Metaphor View Post
    Hopefully this won't be offensive to anyone but this introversion/extroversion concept nags me.

    If by defining introversion/extroversion by charging with or without other people, we have to question why the difference of recharging. Do introverts (and I still might be one myself since some people drain me badly and others charge) lean towards a tendency to want to control the interaction, that in anticipating how the interaction would go, feel drained when it doesn't go the expected way so more energy must be put into the interaction to reroute it to anticipated results?
    I don't think it is about control.

    From what I understand introverts' brains have a high level of chemical stimulation and it doesn't take too much to overload them. They withdraw because they literally feel overwhelmed by more than a small amount of human interaction. Extroverts' brains are not as naturally stimulated so must seek out others to induce that chemical reaction.
    INFP 4w5 so/sp

    I've dreamt in my life dreams that have stayed with me ever after, and changed my ideas;
    they've gone through and through me, like wine through water, and altered the colour of my mind.

    - Emily Bronte

  4. #34
    nee andante bechimo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IZthe411 View Post
    I see where you are going. That's an interesting way to spin it.

    @ BOLD You inspire me LOL

    ESTP the coolest of the cool
    Ti+Se
    Equal worry free
    Come what may,
    Si-Fi-Ni don't get no play
    until they run up on an ENTJ!


    Nicely done!

    Quote Originally Posted by Southern Kross View Post
    I don't think it is about control.

    From what I understand introverts' brains have a high level of chemical stimulation and it doesn't take too much to overload them. They withdraw because they literally feel overwhelmed by more than a small amount of human interaction. Extroverts' brains are not as naturally stimulated so must seek out others to induce that chemical reaction.
    *takes a deep hit* Yeah, I'm feeling kind of munchie. Want some crackers?

    Okay, now seriously. Has this been scientifically proven, the difference between an introverts and extroverts brain? I'm asking since I honestly don't know.

  5. #35
    From the Undertow CuriousFeeling's Avatar
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    I tend to find one-on-one interaction more satisfying than a huge group. If I had to get up and lecture in front of people, I wouldn't have a problem with it, but I find huge crowds of people overwhelming. But I like to have a close group of friends I can confide with. I like to find someone who cares that I can take into my world of imagination, to be with someone who I can share my feelings and thoughts. I truly like people, just after a long amount of time being in a very high-intensity and high excitement environment, it takes energy away from me, and I like to spend time on my own reflecting on my experiences, as well as relaxing on my own to decompress. I find I gain much more energy from spending thoughtful reflective time at home. I like social interaction, but I usually need to give myself an energy boost to get through it.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

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  6. #36
    Away with the fairies Southern Kross's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Metaphor View Post


    Nicely done!

    *takes a deep hit* Yeah, I'm feeling kind of munchie. Want some crackers?

    Okay, now seriously. Has this been scientifically proven, the difference between an introverts and extroverts brain? I'm asking since I honestly don't know.
    I think so. I think I read an article on it somewhere...

    Here's one I found from USA Today. I don't know how scientific it is:

    Experts: Introverted youth have deep roots for behavior

    By Janie Magruder, Gannett News ServiceMon Nov 28, 7:36 AM ET

    The attitude that there's something wrong with introverted people is widely shared in society, where fast talk and snap decisions are often valued over listening, deliberation and careful planning. Extroverts seem to rule the world or, at least, the USA, which hasn't elected an introverted president for three decades, since Jimmy Carter.

    "The signals we get from the world agree that extroversion is valued," says Sanford Cohn, an associate professor in curriculum and instruction at Arizona State University. "A lot of the messages we get from society have to do with being social, and in order to be social you have to behave a certain way."

    But that is impossible for introverted kids. Raising them isn't easy, particularly if parents, family members, teachers, coaches and other adults don't allow them to be who they are.

    Introverted children enjoy the internal world of thoughts, feelings and fantasies, and there's a physiological reason for this. Researchers using brain scans have found introverts have more brain activity in general, and specifically in the frontal lobes. When these areas are activated, introverts are energized by retrieving long-term memories, problem solving, introspection, complex thinking and planning.

    Extroverts enjoy the external world of things, people and activities. They have more activity in brain areas involved in processing the sensory information we're bombarded with daily. Because extroverts have less internally generated brain activity, they search for more external stimuli to energize them.

    "It's the different pathways that are turned on that activate the behaviors and abilities we see in introverts and extroverts," says Marti Olsen Laney, a neuroscience researcher and author in Portland, Ore., who is credited with connecting introversion with its underlying biology. "It impacts all areas of their lives: how they process information, how they restore their energy, what they enjoy and how they communicate."

    Introverted children need time alone more than do extroverted children, says Laney, whose book, The Hidden Gifts of the Introverted Child, is due in January. "Extroverts gain energy by being out and about," but "being with people takes energy from introverts, and they need to get away to restore that energy."

    Laney says introverted kids also behave differently.

    They're not slow, inattentive or shy. Shyness is behavior that may diminish as children grow; introversion is a character trait that lasts.
    INFP 4w5 so/sp

    I've dreamt in my life dreams that have stayed with me ever after, and changed my ideas;
    they've gone through and through me, like wine through water, and altered the colour of my mind.

    - Emily Bronte

  7. #37
    Uniqueorn William K's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Southern Kross View Post
    From what I understand introverts' brains have a high level of chemical stimulation and it doesn't take too much to overload them. They withdraw because they literally feel overwhelmed by more than a small amount of human interaction. Extroverts' brains are not as naturally stimulated so must seek out others to induce that chemical reaction.
    I think that's more from the theory about highly sensitive persons (HSPs), who can also be extroverts.
    4w5, Fi>Ne>Ti>Si>Ni>Fe>Te>Se, sp > so > sx

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  8. #38
    nee andante bechimo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Southern Kross View Post
    I think so. I think I read an article on it somewhere...

    Here's one I found from USA Today. I don't know how scientific it is:
    This is interesting since there are studies that show that as a we age, our brain does a trim on neural pathways, leaving open only those that we utilize. So does this mean the introversion/extroversion dichotomy is something inherent from birth or is it something environmentally influenced that interact with our naturally heritable traits? In other words, do we all begin life wide open and due to a combination of traits and environmental influences, become one or the other?

    As a borderline extrovert/introvert, it's one of those issues that fascinate.

  9. #39
    Away with the fairies Southern Kross's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Metaphor View Post
    This is interesting since there are studies that show that as a we age, our brain does a trim on neural pathways, leaving open only those that we utilize. So does this mean the introversion/extroversion dichotomy is something inherent from birth or is it something environmentally influenced that interact with our naturally heritable traits? In other words, do we all begin life wide open and due to a combination of traits and environmental influences, become one or the other?

    As a borderline extrovert/introvert, it's one of those issues that fascinate.
    You make a good point about the neural pathways. I wonder how much is nature and how much can be changed in regards to that. Exposure to situations we find unpleasant can also help develop new neural pathways and make it easier on you to deal with them. I have severely reduced my level of introversion by forcing myself to deal with people but I do sense that I can only go so far with this. I still really struggle in social situations and at being so withdrawn. It makes me think that maybe all I did was reduce my shyness not my introversion...
    INFP 4w5 so/sp

    I've dreamt in my life dreams that have stayed with me ever after, and changed my ideas;
    they've gone through and through me, like wine through water, and altered the colour of my mind.

    - Emily Bronte

  10. #40
    nee andante bechimo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Southern Kross View Post
    You make a good point about the neural pathways. I wonder how much is nature and how much can be changed in regards to that. Exposure to situations we find unpleasant can also help develop new neural pathways and make it easier on you to deal with them. I have severely reduced my level of introversion by forcing myself to deal with people but I do sense that I can only go so far with this. I still really struggle in social situations and at being so withdrawn. It makes me think that maybe all I did was reduce my shyness not my introversion...
    Either is possible. I honestly don't know. But for sure, when I make the effort to reach out, it gets easier. I've also read that it's possible to forge new neural pathways. Don't know where the line is drawn in relation to aging.

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