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  1. #11
    Senior Member Blown Ghost's Avatar
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    This seems like a very inconsistent method to such an important and, more-so, intrinsic part of life... I say that because it's hard to compare yourself to another person, recognize, and separate what you do and do not do from their behavior objectively because no matter how similar you are always dealing with a whole 'nother animal. The most solid tool I have found for not only self-awareness but most forms of self-development is meta-thinking. I understand that, at first, meta-thinking seems a little paranormal, but it's actually fairly simple and very enlightening once someone starts to make regular use of it.

    To perform meta-thought, start by realizing that at the very least you are entirely contained to yourself, everything you've ever known, know now, and will ever know contained in your brain. "It's all in your head" is very literally and concretely true, and it's an important foundation to reigning in emotions about what you're experiencing. Then, realize that this applies to everyone, and what largely separates the emotionally/psychologically/intellectually functioning and capable from the dysfunctional is what is contained in your mind (i.e. all thoughts and perspectives on life may exist and be recognized, but are not equal, healthy, and ultimately beneficial).

    Meta-thinking, then, is developing, altering, or even entirely removing what is within your mind based on a feedback loop. To meta-think, you must start by taking any thought in your mind, putting it into words as literally as possible, and then projecting exactly that onto an imaginary you.

    Using the realization of the concrete separation of persons in the second paragraph, if you can imaginary this other you entirely separate from yourself and build their behavior from your own mind. The idea behind meta-thinking is that instead of the typical "inside only" relationship to self, you can have a relationship with yourself that nearly matches the level of objectivity you can have of another person's behavior. Once you form a judgement about this person (which is actually you) you can pull the projected thoughts back and use the outside/inside view to change your thinking for the better. It might seem complicated, but it's kind of like what you do when you would look in the mirror to check your appearance and make adjustments.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blown Ghost View Post
    This seems like a very inconsistent method to such an important and, more-so, intrinsic part of life... I say that because it's hard to compare yourself to another person, recognize, and separate what you do and do not do from their behavior objectively because no matter how similar you are always dealing with a whole 'nother animal. The most solid tool I have found for not only self-awareness but most forms of self-development is meta-thinking. I understand that, at first, meta-thinking seems a little paranormal, but it's actually fairly simple and very enlightening once someone starts to make regular use of it.

    To perform meta-thought, start by realizing that at the very least you are entirely contained to yourself, everything you've ever known, know now, and will ever know contained in your brain. "It's all in your head" is very literally and concretely true, and it's an important foundation to reigning in emotions about what you're experiencing. Then, realize that this applies to everyone, and what largely separates the emotionally/psychologically/intellectually functioning and capable from the dysfunctional is what is contained in your mind (i.e. all thoughts and perspectives on life may exist and be recognized, but are not equal, healthy, and ultimately beneficial).

    Meta-thinking, then, is developing, altering, or even entirely removing what is within your mind based on a feedback loop. To meta-think, you must start by taking any thought in your mind, putting it into words as literally as possible, and then projecting exactly that onto an imaginary you.

    Using the realization of the concrete separation of persons in the second paragraph, if you can imaginary this other you entirely separate from yourself and build their behavior from your own mind. The idea behind meta-thinking is that instead of the typical "inside only" relationship to self, you can have a relationship with yourself that nearly matches the level of objectivity you can have of another person's behavior. Once you form a judgement about this person (which is actually you) you can pull the projected thoughts back and use the outside/inside view to change your thinking for the better. It might seem complicated, but it's kind of like what you do when you would look in the mirror to check your appearance and make adjustments.
    Well its certainly not that scientific. And yes, if we are not taking in all info we miss pieces- that mainly includes the info related to every day life so to speak, and not necessarily type.

    I still will say again that I believe that those of us who are less prevalent in type may miss out- At least I think I do. I savor the few experiences I've had knowing other ENFJs and wish I knew more.

  3. #13
    Senior Member animenagai's Avatar
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    I think watching the videos of other ENFP's really gave me some insight to my own type. That may seem weird to you, am I just projecting to be a type I'm not? Well, that's not quite I mean. For example, I watched Wonka and SS's vids and I realise that my Ne goofiness is why more expressed than theirs. I think people see them as being more sincere. I've had a 'problem' for a while, I was so goofy that I was pretty much an attention whore, or at least I was seen as one, I just goofed off to keep the buzz going in social situations. Now I at least try to talk more about someone else's problems. I also try not to cut people's sentences short (I wasn't trying to be rude, it was my way of showing that I was on the same page as others) as I've come to realise that it could be annoying. I felt that I learned some skills to deal with the other facets of being an ENFP, not just the off the wall Ne stuff I'm so fond of. So yeah, thanks guys.
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  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by animenagai View Post
    I think watching the videos of other ENFP's really gave me some insight to my own type. That may seem weird to you, am I just projecting to be a type I'm not? Well, that's not quite I mean. For example, I watched Wonka and SS's vids and I realise that my Ne goofiness is why more expressed than theirs. I think people see them as being more sincere. I've had a 'problem' for a while, I was so goofy that I was pretty much an attention whore, or at least I was seen as one, I just goofed off to keep the buzz going in social situations. Now I at least try to talk more about someone else's problems. I also try not to cut people's sentences short (I wasn't trying to be rude, it was my way of showing that I was on the same page as others) as I've come to realise that it could be annoying. I felt that I learned some skills to deal with the other facets of being an ENFP, not just the off the wall Ne stuff I'm so fond of. So yeah, thanks guys.
    Thank you animenagai. Just the kinda stuff that fascinates me.
    I really appreciate you going out on a limb and sharing.

  5. #15
    Seriously Delirious Udog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Afkan View Post
    How would you rate your self-awareness, and has it been boosted from others of your same exact type?
    I consider my self-awareness to be somewhat advanced, although I won't even pretend that I don't have HUGE blindspots. I know this because just a couple of days ago I uncovered a HUGE blindspot that will offer me an opportunity for growth, if I pursue it.

    When I first started at INFP Globalchatter and first came here, other INFPs provided a great deal of insight. Oftentimes, it was an INFP putting into cogent words the fuzzy thoughts that had only swirled in my mind. For example, another INFP E9 talked about how she loved Venn diagrams, and she would make them for almost everything. It made me realize I also created internal Venn diagrams during times of conflict, as I have found that conflict is best resolved by first identifying the common ground.

    My observations in the Fi-Si loop came from noticing how other INFPs seem to struggle in similar fashion. It quit being a *me* problem, and became a mental trap that people like myself fall into.

    Once I reached a certain point though, I quit receiving the big Ah-Hah!s from other INFPs. I would love to meet an INFP that has resolved the issues I am currently facing. As it is, I find that other types are now more helpful in digging up blindspots and offering thought out solutions on how to tackle them.

  6. #16
    Senior Member Wild horses's Avatar
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    It's great to observe people of my type because I can look at their behaviour and in some cases see my own objectively and understand why people react to me in the way that they do... I was having this conversation with a member last week... that MBTI describes personality and ennegram describes behaviour! and soto go a step further I understand and have learnt stuff about myself from observing those with the same ennegram type as me also. What I have found particularly illuminating is the way ENFP 7w6 behaves under stress and also the avoidance... in both cases it's hard for me to see my behaviour because when stress or put in confrontational situations that make me wanna run I'm acting on adrenalin and can't really think about my actions... so watching someone else display them is interesting!
    ... couldn't drag me away

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