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  1. #11
    Member Fenekk's Avatar
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    Aaaaaand here's an INFJ who works in the art field and wouldn't want to be anywhere else. It's not that I can't do science. I can, and I love it - especially earth science. But I really feel like my calling is the arts, and I couldn't be happier. Besides, I have a way with words, colors, designs, and the pencil (okay, so I definitely need the eraser, ha!) that I feel would be wasted if I did anything else. I think my dad was really upset I didn't end up in science, though.
    NaNoWriMo 2010 [[Nahe: Iveor]]
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by musicnerd93 View Post
    Not in my case. I hate science. Too analytical.

    But, someone I know, that I'm almost positive is an INFP works for Lilly. So, I guess it's not impossible.

    Most INFP's, even if they don't work in an art field, still consider themselves to be artists "deep down."

    No reason a scientist can't be an artist as well.

  3. #13
    Sugar Hiccup OrangeAppled's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Biaxident View Post
    No reason a scientist can't be an artist as well.
    Some of us are good at both
    Often a star was waiting for you to notice it. A wave rolled toward you out of the distant past, or as you walked under an open window, a violin yielded itself to your hearing. All this was mission. But could you accomplish it? (Rilke)

    INFP | 4w5 sp/sx | RLUEI - Primary Inquisitive | Tritype is tripe

  4. #14
    Senior Member mochajava's Avatar
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    MIT has an event where people working for the university display their art or perform Also, music is the most common second major at that school. Yay scientists + artists!

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by OrangeAppled View Post
    Some of us are good at both
    Hubris.

    Quote Originally Posted by mochajava View Post
    MIT has an event where people working for the university display their art or perform Also, music is the most common second major at that school. Yay scientists + artists!

    Cool. You can't be a cold, emotionless, number crunching computer, all the time.

  6. #16
    Senior Member Scott N Denver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hilo View Post
    Thanks for the replies, all very interesting.

    I agree that either type can do it. ANY type can do almost any job, of course. I'm talking about likelihood merely because it came up in the context of this person - who I still can't type worth a damn (leaning INFP though, so there are others in hard science out there... )

    In my field (physics), the main type by far is ISTJ/ESTJ, followed by ISTP, INTJ, ENTJ, and INTP.

    As a Ti-user, I find there is a huge place for it in my work, along with Ne... I use them together to build systems to explain data. The 'P' if it may be considered on it's own, is quite useful in letting me jump out of the box and make connections that others won't because they're tied down to the current paradigms too much. Of course it also makes it hard for me to draw lines in writing up a result.

    I think it could depend on the person's personal development as well. For instance, male INFP (similarly situated in some ways as a female INTP) are going to be pushed early and often to develop other functions. Perhaps this gives them the kind of early balance which allows for them to use lesser-preferred functions ?

    Scott N Denver - if you don't mind my asking, if you got out of science, what do you think you would do? Would it necessarily be more people-oriented?
    My science education is in physics. For the record, 4 yr BS degree, MS, all required coursework for PhD, spent 5 years at grad school and 6.5 yrs in grad school. Primarily attended 2 grad schools [and quasi-attended a 3rd], worked in 2 govt research labs, have friends at and interviewed at 3rd govt lab.

    My graduating class from college was 6 people in physics, 5 of us went on to grad school. 80% going to grad school is avg for that program at that school. All people I specifically recall form my year are: 1 INFP [me], 1 ?ESTP?, and the rest INTJ's [at least 3]. It is my assessment that most of my classmates, who may have been 1 yr ahead or 1 yr behind me, were INTJ. The exceedingly vast majority of my peers at both grad schools were, in my assessment, INTJ's. When I looked at the undergrads, most in my assessment, were also INTJ. Second most common: INTP. Excluding technicians, I have only had 2 S coworkers that I know, both ISTP. I've seen a small smattering of ENT's in physics as well. Beyond a shadow of a doubt, I'd peg the number of "physics peers" I've had that were INTJ's as 75%. I know of only 3 NF's in all this time: INFP, ENFP, and INFJ. Only the INFJ actually went all the way to PhD.

    I've read MBTI about science and engineering students. Engineers actually have a much better balance between N's and S's. Civil is much more full of S's, I think ChemE is more evenly split, and EE and the more theoretical disciplines being more N-dominated. If you only accept people who had physics degrees, I know of only 2 S individuals ever that I've dealt with, ever.

    At one of my places we took a MBTI test, and got 2 S's [one without a physics degree], 1 INFP, INTP, several INTJ's, and two people who were IJ but unable to distinguish between F and T. Talking to my old advisor, most of the students at that tech school who took the MBTI came back INT

    Quote Originally Posted by INTPness View Post
    This piqued my interest. I agree with your post in large part about INTJ's dominating the science fields and being the most cut out for it, but I'd also like to understand why you think Ti has no place in science. What about Ti makes it not suitable to science? And also, if it's not suitable to science, what fields do you think it is more suitable for?

    I have my own personal answer for these questions already, but I'm interested to hear your opinion, since you have experience in the field.
    I think Ti *should* have a place in science. And if you get a INTP prof with a PhD you'll definitely see the Ti. I think of math as the prototypical example of Ti, and yes there is a lot of math in physics. However, IME, most physics peeps are NTJ's, and hence Te users. For almost all physics people I've met, math is nothing more than a crank one turns to calculate something. It seems to me like people have an idea, assert it, and then test something involving it. There idea and its assertion don't follow Ti. The best I've come up with is Ni and then Te execution, or just Te. Te excels at organizing. "what is efficient?" "how can we organize this system?" seem like prototypical examples of applying Te. Theoretical completeness is NOT a common concern of Te.

    Again, I think Ti ha s aplace in science, it definitely should ahve a place in science, but most physics peep are Te users, with Ni, and they teach and explain that way. If you try and go Ti on them, IME they get all pissy and annoyed like you are belaboring unimportant points, or wasting their types, or getting stuck in unimportant trivialities. This attitude is particularly expressed when it comes to attitudes towards math and teaching math. Quick and dirty [and poorly-defiined I would add seems to be the SOP of how physics teaches math, if you ask me. I wish it wasn't this way. It really sucks. I remember rereading textbooks 7-8 time or more, and never having it click, and then picking up a math text on the same subject, reading it once, and then understanding all of it almost effortlessly.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hopelandic View Post
    I don't agree with the idea of intjs' "dominating" the science fields. As in, found more in science than any other type. But I can see a very strong lean towards the intj mindset characterising modern science.

    I am doing an advance science degree, and in one of my subjects (basically a learning to be a scientist class) we had to take a keirsey test.

    And i'll quote myself here



    I think you might find certain types in certain sciences though. You might find more xnxx in applied science, and more xsxx in base research. You might find more xnfx in psychology, cosmology, environmental science etc. But 'more' in terms of located in a particular science field as opposed to others. Not 'more' as in, more of that type than any other, are found in that field.
    I've stated my experience with #'s/% of INTJ's above. Also, you should flip what was said, would be for basic research, and S for applied research.


    Other fields may be different. I've seen more ENTJ women in chemistry for example. I';d expecta much better TF balance in biology. But physics, IME, is INT as snot. Especially once you hit grad school, then its INTJ as snot. Throw in an obligatory ENTJ or INTP or two for good measure.

  7. #17
    Senior Member Scott N Denver's Avatar
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    Hilo, what year/level of physics are you in?

    Intro physics in college is required of engineers, which broadens the spectrum, but get through that so only the physics majors and minors are left, and its much more personality-segregated. If I had any ST physics peers, I'll bet they wanted to teach at the high school level. We had one physics/CompSci double, he seemed INTP. I think we had one INTP 1 or 2 yrs younger than my graduating class, and one INTP in grad school. INTP seemed more prevalent amongst physics profs though. Anyways, don[t discount year/level/program in terms of "personality segregation"

  8. #18
    Sugar Hiccup OrangeAppled's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Biaxident View Post
    Hubris.
    Healthy self-confidence (that I mostly fake). ESTJs know the necessity of this...that's why they get the jobs.
    Often a star was waiting for you to notice it. A wave rolled toward you out of the distant past, or as you walked under an open window, a violin yielded itself to your hearing. All this was mission. But could you accomplish it? (Rilke)

    INFP | 4w5 sp/sx | RLUEI - Primary Inquisitive | Tritype is tripe

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by OrangeAppled View Post
    Healthy self-confidence (that I mostly fake). ESTJs know the necessity of this...that's why they get the jobs.

    You know I tease.

  10. #20
    Senior Member hilo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott N Denver View Post
    Hilo, what year/level of physics are you in?

    Intro physics in college is required of engineers, which broadens the spectrum, but get through that so only the physics majors and minors are left, and its much more personality-segregated. If I had any ST physics peers, I'll bet they wanted to teach at the high school level. We had one physics/CompSci double, he seemed INTP. I think we had one INTP 1 or 2 yrs younger than my graduating class, and one INTP in grad school. INTP seemed more prevalent amongst physics profs though. Anyways, don[t discount year/level/program in terms of "personality segregation"
    About to finish Ph.D.

    My feelings for the balance of types are of course totally stemming from the people I have met at my school, so take it with a huge grain of salt Now that I reflect on it though, it's the applied physics side (where I have the most friends, because frankly they are more fun) that has most of the ISTJ/ESTJ types. My 'theoretical' hallway certainly has its share of INTP and INTJ, and a smattering of people so quiet that I haven't been able to type them. It's possible some of them are little secret NFs or something else. My boss is an ISTP, and there is definitely an ESTP across the way (we call him the "salesman"... I won't get into what I think of his science).

    I find it interesting that many INFP are adept at using Te. It's something I would like to learn to do better.
    I have come to believe that the whole world is an enigma, a harmless enigma that is made terrible by our own mad attempt to interpret it as though it had an underlying truth.
    - Umberto Eco

    INTP e9 (sx/so/sp)
    Ti = Ne (41.3) > Si (31.2) ~ Ni (31.1) ~ Te (30.1) > Se (24.1) >> Fe (21) & Fi (20.1)

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