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  1. #1
    Senior Member milkyway2's Avatar
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    Default How you decide what is the "right" thing to do??

    My mother and lots of other people I know seem to have some idea that there are "right" and "wrong" things to do.

    I don't believe in this.

    Explain it to me.

  2. #2
    The Destroyer Colors's Avatar
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    Sorry to all concrete up in here, but what's the situational example? What exactly don't you agree with?

    Of the concept in general- if you think of a decision as a Choose-Your-Adventure sort of story, and you can make two choices (getting all many-worlds interpretation in here)- isn't it possible to think that one world that could result is "better" (more favorably aligned to your ideal) than the other? 'Course that's all hinges on your confidence in your ability to read the outcomes. But we all do it to some extent-expect similar outcomes for similar situations. ("Reason", I suppose.)

  3. #3
    Supreme High Commander Andy's Avatar
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    I'd have to agree that morality of a decision depends upon the situation, but I'd also say that it hinges upon a persons perception and assessment of the situation.

    In general, the morally correct choice is the one that does the most good, or the least harm. However, it is usually impossible to know the outcome of a decision until it is made, so the morality rests in making a judgement call as to what will result in what. Following what one believes to be the correct course is moral, even if it turns out that your judgement is disasterously wrong.

    Because peoples perception of the world is different, it is possible for two people to be in exactly the same situation, make radically different choices and yet botth of them still be acting morally. Conversly, it is possible for two people to make the same choice, but one of them to be acting imorally because they chose that cause for dubious reasons. In fact, it's possible for two people to be trying to throatle the life out of each other over a difference of opinion and both to acting morally correctly.

  4. #4
    it's a nuclear device antireconciler's Avatar
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    Saying something, X, is the "right" thing to do in the situation, S, usually is just shorthand meaning:

    1) Cost-benefit analysis including consideration of consequences and means yields that X is the best action going forward in situation S.
    2) Temptation exists to take action Y which is not equal to X, which appears to promise a short-term personal gratification, but with consequences which are not as good as X, considered impersonally.

    It is then said in situation, S, that X is the "right" thing to do, which is equivalent to a plea to have faith and resist temptation, taking instead the course which is best in the long run.
    ~ a n t i r e c o n c i l e r
    What is death, dies.
    What is life, lives.

  5. #5
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    right wrong good bad

    I think it's sad.(not really)

  6. #6
    the Dark Prophet of Kualu
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    Quote Originally Posted by antireconciler View Post
    Saying something, X, is the "right" thing to do in the situation, S, usually is just shorthand meaning:

    1) Cost-benefit analysis including consideration of consequences and means yields that X is the best action going forward in situation S.
    2) Temptation exists to take action Y which is not equal to X, which appears to promise a short-term personal gratification, but with consequences which are not as good as X, considered impersonally.

    It is then said in situation, S, that X is the "right" thing to do, which is equivalent to a plea to have faith and resist temptation, taking instead the course which is best in the long run.
    Worth noting is that in national economics the basic principle behind is that a person maximizes his interests opposite of optimizing them; thus probably render the answer of Y critically more often than X.

    I dunno where that came from.
    In an objective view, there's no right or wrong, efficency nor inefficency or anything else subject to your views.
    So, I guess that's what you've come up with too, probably a more detailed description but that's my own best view.
    Open for interpretation.
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    Fell for the temptation: Nohari / Johari

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gtzk View Post
    Worth noting is that in national economics the basic principle behind is that a person maximizes his interests opposite of optimizing them; thus probably render the answer of Y critically more often than X.

    I dunno where that came from.
    In an objective view, there's no right or wrong, efficency nor inefficency or anything else subject to your views.
    So, I guess that's what you've come up with too, probably a more detailed description but that's my own best view.
    I still think you're both wrong.

  8. #8
    the Dark Prophet of Kualu
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miserable View Post
    I still think you're both wrong.
    Wait, what both?
    Ok, cool. Help me out, how have you thought about it?
    Open for interpretation.
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    Fell for the temptation: Nohari / Johari

  9. #9
    Senior Member Tiltyred's Avatar
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    I think post-modernism is a way to madness.

    It's frustrating sometimes to have to conduct your life while respecting a myriad of value systems that disagree with each other. It's easier if we can agree on certain rules of etiquette, some standards of behavior, some customs. We are less likely to disappoint and/or confuse each other if we're all on the same page.

    Don't you think?

  10. #10
    Senior Member Moiety's Avatar
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    Morality (or lack thereof) is a tool with certain goals in minds. Where goals differ, that's where morals differ. Social acceptance, self-preservation, etc etc You decide what is the right thing to do based on a conscious or subconscious ultimate goal. Priority.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tiltyred View Post
    I think post-modernism is a way to madness.

    It's frustrating sometimes to have to conduct your life while respecting a myriad of value systems that disagree with each other.
    You can always choose to disrespect, though.

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