User Tag List

First 23456 Last

Results 31 to 40 of 56

  1. #31
    #005645 phthalocyanine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    9w1 sx
    Socionics
    IEI
    Posts
    681

    Default

    ^ that depends on their concept of god...many christians believe god comes to humanity in their darkest hour of need.

    "We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.."
    -Oscar Wilde



  2. #32
    Senior Member TopherRed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    MBTI
    ENFJ
    Enneagram
    2w3 so/sx
    Posts
    1,273

    Default

    Only if they sit and observe their surroundings, Under. I'm sorry, but as an NFJ, I am prone to helping. If they had any Js at all among them, I'm 100% sure they'd follow and help improve things too.

    Here's the kicker to those who believe God is cruel:
    God does not do miraculously, what men can do naturally. He wants us to love one another, and we've been given the opportunity; specifically, he's called us to love our neighbors. We might not be able to help the starving children in Africa, but we can definitely help the poor and hungry in our own neighborhood. If a natural disaster ever happened in Sacramento, I would be held responsible to show love, by giving of myself whatever I could to help those affected by it.

    Look carefully at a world where nobody helps anyone else, and you have found a place where people blame God for not doing anything; the whole time, God is staring down at them, saddened by the fact that they choose to do nothing, despite the fact that the power to do so is in their grasp.
    Love is the point.

  3. #33
    #005645 phthalocyanine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    9w1 sx
    Socionics
    IEI
    Posts
    681

    Default

    good point. people who conceptualize god as some distant, passive figure and fail to see this god in themselves or others seem to miss out on a lot. personally, i don't get the point of this "passive faith"... it seems selfish and incomplete. most religions explicitly state that acts charity are faithful acts, and encourage their followers to engage in them. it's sad when the effective points of a religion are ignored in favor of the more questionable ones.

    -if there's no practical application of faith, why have it? that's like having strong political opinions and never voicing them or acting on them... they're as good as non-existent as far as the world at large is concerned; its not helping anybody. and in that case it seems more like a crutch for an individual rather than an instrument for a collective.

    maybe that was underradar's point...in that case i beg to differ. not all INFP's, or faithful people, or faithful INFP's are possessed of such a short sense of vision or activity.


    Quote Originally Posted by Fuzzcrossed View Post
    We might not be able to help the starving children in Africa, but we can definitely help the poor and hungry in our own neighborhood.
    i agree that charity begins at home, but i disagree that we can't help others, too. yes, problems like world hunger seem like such big mountains to cross, and they are, but limiting our sense of ability to combat these problems are a self-fulfilling prophesy. it is foolish to think that baby steps wouldn't be worth it.

    "We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.."
    -Oscar Wilde



  4. #34
    Senior Member compulsiverambler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Enneagram
    5w6 sp/so
    Posts
    446

    Default

    I'm deeply drawn to religion. The urge to join one comes and goes in waves. I'd even like to try living in a religious commune. Sadly I've concluded it would probably be a bad idea to pretend to believe in Jesus or Krishna Consciousness so I could do that.

    I'd definitely join an organisation or commune that didn't mind if you were just role playing in the rituals and didn't really believe in any of it, just as battle re-enactment clubs don't expect you to. Maybe I'll set one up one day.

    The appeal is in regularly getting lost and immersed in a mystical, awe-inspiring fantasy of the divine and the sacred and the symbolic or of living in romanticised times and places like pre-Christian Northern and Western Europe. Asatru looks like loads of fun but even some of them seem to take it too seriously.

  5. #35

  6. #36
    #005645 phthalocyanine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    9w1 sx
    Socionics
    IEI
    Posts
    681

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by compulsiverambler View Post
    The appeal is in regularly getting lost and immersed in a mystical, awe-inspiring fantasy of the divine and the sacred and the symbolic or of living in romanticised times and places like pre-Christian Northern and Western Europe.
    druids, lol.

    "We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.."
    -Oscar Wilde



  7. #37
    Senior Member compulsiverambler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Enneagram
    5w6 sp/so
    Posts
    446

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nanook View Post
    lol, try a laughing club
    Well, I guess they're not taking it too seriously, and there are no arbitrary rules to take home and inflict on the world.

    Looks like fun, though rather lacking in robes and chants and morbid story telling for my taste. They should spice things up with a mock sacrifice or two.

  8. #38
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    MBTI
    infp
    Posts
    19

    Default

    I come to clarify my point, so I hope everyone will understand it better.

    When I say 'god', I mean in term of god as in Creation's belief, like god who create the world, live above the sky and giving us blessing. So when I say there's no god, I meant we're all alone in our world which is chaotic, random, no high power up there who will punish bad people, or look after the good one.

    My point is, the only thing I have faith in is potential of humanity, that's the power is actually in our hands to change things for the better. Because of that fact make me interested in Buddhism's belief as well because it support the idea of human's growth; praticing meditation to gain more consciousness and wisdom, also overall Buddhism's philosophy that i find interesting. Having said that, I'm never praticing or anything.('why not?' is a long story.)

    PS. Sorry for my poor English. I hope you get it though.

  9. #39
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    MBTI
    infp
    Posts
    19

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fuzzcrossed View Post
    Only if they sit and observe their surroundings, Under. I'm sorry, but as an NFJ, I am prone to helping. If they had any Js at all among them, I'm 100% sure they'd follow and help improve things too.

    I think it's not about J or P function that determine people when they
    decide to help or not help something. Most of the time, I believe it's due to
    lack of inspiration which pronounce it more strongly in this world today.

  10. #40
    man-made neptunesnet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    5&4 sx
    Socionics
    INFj
    Posts
    1,232

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by souffle View Post
    I personally find it hard to believe that any Fi dominant could hold strong fundamentalist beliefs, which would mean to accept the eternal damnation, but feel free to correct me.
    Well, this is my correcting you.
    I hold strong fundamentalist beliefs while still being able to have the capacity to be empathetic to others at an extreme extent. Aren't INFPs always revered for their strong moral system? Did you miss that in the INFP description?

    Would it be feasible to say that INFP's would be more fond of religion as a personal and unique relationship with a loving and supportive God rather than a large scale, conformist, by-the-book worship of a God that is possessive and strict?
    Well...yeeah.


    Quote Originally Posted by brainheart View Post
    I hate it when people dis on religions or those who are religious with stupid sweeping generalizations like, "The Catholic Church is evil" or "Mormons are psycho", etc. It almost makes me want to go to church again just so I can rub it in their faces or something.
    I couldn't agree more. Before I started going to Quaker services, I was always hesitant to learn more about it because of other people's suspicion of the denomination. But now it feels normal. I couldn't even imagine what someone could see wrong with it.

    I liked my religious upbringing but no longer felt the need for it around the age of eighteen. I walk in and it doesn't seem relevant to me anymore; it's like writing a sixth grade diary entry while wearing clothes five sizes too small.
    Even though I'm fairly religious, I can also relate. My grandparents are Southern Baptists and, let me tell you, black Southern Baptists churches were FOUNDED on extraverts. I always felt out of place. If I didn't scream and shout out to my Lord (in the middle of service like everyone else, mind you!), then I wasn't truly experiencing him :rolli:. There isn't just one way to praise Him. My way is simply different from theirs. Done.

    Quote Originally Posted by underradar View Post
    I'm sure if all infp come to live in third world country, they won't believe in god anymore.
    Quote Originally Posted by phthalocyanine View Post
    ^ that depends on their concept of god...many christians believe god comes to humanity in their darkest hour of need.
    +1 for phthalocyanine


    Quote Originally Posted by Fuzzcrossed View Post
    Here's the kicker to those who believe God is cruel: God does not do miraculously, what men can do naturally. He wants us to love one another, and we've been given the opportunity; specifically, he's called us to love our neighbors. We might not be able to help the starving children in Africa, but we can definitely help the poor and hungry in our own neighborhood. If a natural disaster ever happened in Sacramento, I would be held responsible to show love, by giving of myself whatever I could to help those affected by it.

    Look carefully at a world where nobody helps anyone else, and you have found a place where people blame God for not doing anything; the whole time, God is staring down at them, saddened by the fact that they choose to do nothing, despite the fact that the power to do so is in their grasp.


    Quote Originally Posted by compulsiverambler View Post
    The urge to join one comes and goes in waves. I'd even like to try living in a religious commune.
    I'm seriously thinking of joining a religious commune after I graduate or while I'm in graduate school. The idea is just too attractive to me.

Similar Threads

  1. [INFP] Are INFPs "sexy"?
    By spacecadette in forum The NF Idyllic (ENFP, INFP, ENFJ, INFJ)
    Replies: 480
    Last Post: 04-24-2015, 08:36 AM
  2. [INFP] Are INFP's boring???
    By Scott N Denver in forum The NF Idyllic (ENFP, INFP, ENFJ, INFJ)
    Replies: 71
    Last Post: 06-14-2012, 10:22 AM
  3. [INFP] WHY THE HELL are INFPs so $(% depressed?!
    By Koocoomoo in forum The NF Idyllic (ENFP, INFP, ENFJ, INFJ)
    Replies: 38
    Last Post: 11-10-2009, 04:11 PM
  4. [INFP] Are INFPs Easy to Pick on?
    By Ginkgo in forum The NF Idyllic (ENFP, INFP, ENFJ, INFJ)
    Replies: 86
    Last Post: 10-27-2009, 03:11 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO