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  1. #31
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    The weird thing is I took a paid career test to see what fields I should go into and health sciences was at the top of my results. But now...I'm scared. Oh well, medical school isn't for everyone.

    Quote Originally Posted by mochajava View Post
    @Workaholics - fabulous post! I'd want you as my doc and not some crazy ES who won't give me the time of day!
    Exactly! I hate doctors who are rushed, explain things way too scientifically but are too much in a hurry to sufficiently answer your questions, and get a procedure done whether you're in pain or not. The best experience I've had with doctors is a dermatologist and nurse who sat down and explained things in detail and asked several times if I had questions, stopped a procedure to numb me because I was in too much pain, and asked if I was okay throughout the procedure to make sure I wasn't in pain. I wish all doctors and nurses were like them. They had very attractive qualities that patients like.

    Quote Originally Posted by Valerie View Post
    If you have ever seen the TV show House, many of the doctors actually treat people worse than he does.
    I'm scared again.

  2. #32
    Senior Member mochajava's Avatar
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    I want to know how feelers can get through hostile environments. My last work environment was like that -- getting yelled at a lot for stupid things, and it basically made me shut down. I did not function effectively at all, and I got too burnt out from withstanding the toxic environment that I didn't learn as much as I could have. Any ideas? Think I should start a thread on this?

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by mochajava View Post
    Think I should start a thread on this?
    That would help. This thread only draws in people interested in INFJ physicians.

  4. #34
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    Default INFJ Medical Student

    Hey all. This is my first time posting anything anywhere besides facebook, so I feel a bit shy :P. I heard about MBTI a long time ago but I've only really understood my INFJ self for the last year or so after my friend re-introduced me to MBTI and I've been acting sort of like an MBTI prophet, trying to convince everyone I get a chance to interact with, friends and acquaintances.

    I am responding to this thread because my day job is a third year medical student at a very "old school" medical school on the east coast, and boy have I had a rough time for a long time, and I know I'm still in the midst of it all, can't really see the end of the tunnel yet.

    So I'll start from the beginning. Why did I go into medicine? In all honesty, for a mix of reasons, good and "bad", their order of importance constantly shifting according to where I am in life and how I'm feeling. (1) I've always wanted to do some nameless big and great something for the world and humanity yadda yadda. Well you get the pictures. I thought medicine would fulfill my humanitarian instincts. (2) I love interacting with people on a meaningful basis. Sometimes I hate them, and I need more than my fair share of solitude, but god I love people as a whole. (3) Science/medicine is interesting. Not interesting enough to be the only subject I study day in and day out, unfortunately, but interesting. (4) Ah, prestige and respect from others. Oh yeah, baby. I am a bit bipolar in that I both love myself and hate myself simultaneously, and there is something about the prestige of medicine that really fuels/fueled my ego (not sure if my ego's really being fed at all at the present, but maybe a little from, like, the little old lady at the store who automatically likes you when she accidentally finds out you're going to be a doctor). (5) My parents but mostly my mom encouraged it. Not going to lie. (6) Enough money to live comfortably/more than comfortably. Of course! Though honestly, there must be an easier way to get into this salary bracket than this.

    My academic career, in terms of how well I did, has sort of been up and down. Did well in public high school. Got into a college with good name. College was seriously hard. Took a punch, though tamed by grade inflation. Didn't have high enough grades to get into med school. Did a special post-bac program, got really good grades that year, got into med school. First year of med school pretty easy. Second year ridiculously hard, inundated with information and didn't study very hard.

    About not studying very hard...you know, I'm not sure if I'm just particularly a lazy INFJ or if I developed bad habits early on, but I spent many years sort of cramming and then forgetting. I did best on my SATs, which required just "cracking" the test to excel. The MCATs were a little harder--you actually had to know some concepts. And the USMLE, ooo, not so hot. The more "specialized" the exams got, the more my ass got kicked. Call me crazy, but it's not really until now, in my clinicals, when I truly and clearly understand that I need to know sh*t to help people. I thought I would somehow learn everything I needed to know to be a decent doctor through osmosis or even magic, but f*ck, it requires sweat and blood and tears. And I don't think I invested enough of those bodily fluids into learning what I needed to know before I got into the clinic. And now, even when it's obvious how important it is that I know stuff, it's hard for me to work SO HARD for SO many hours at work before coming home to work some more??, and I have so much to make up for from years of nonchalance regarding my academics. Whew.

    So that being said, I'm still surviving, doing the best I can, I have a couple of NF friends here and there in med school, an ENFJ, an INFP, no INFJ though, and a bit of commiseration here and there helps, though only to a certain extent. As an INFJ in the hospital, I run into some problems: So I love people, but I'm introverted, so I can't spend too much time with people without going crazy, and all you do at work is interact with people. My N is raging, so my sensing function is way way under-developed. You have no idea how long it took me (and still takes me) to look up lab values and such. I'm not very logical or objective (sometimes I fool people into believing I am because I SOUND logical/objective because I can speak with conviction), but the true a to b to c type of deduction, eh...not my strong suite. I think my J in combination with other aspects of my personality makes me more proud than some other NF types, so I abhor being at the bottom of the hierarchy, being so lost and confused all the time (even the ESTJs admit med school/residency is hard), being criticized unnecessarily, etc.

    There's a lot more I could talk about, but I've procrastinated from studying long enough. One of the things I'm struggling with the most is what specialty to go into. Dare I ask are there niches in medicine where NFs are more heavily represented. Maybe psychiatry? It seems for most specialties, we are in the minority. Sigh, sigh, and sigh.

    Are there other struggling INFJ med students out there? Does any of this ring true? What about INFJ physicians? Is there really a light at the end of the tunnel? And for any young INFJs thinking of going into medicine, hope this description of my experiences are helpful.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Careberryz View Post
    And for any young INFJs thinking of going into medicine, hope this description of my experiences are helpful.
    ...as well as scary. I don't have the bad practice habits that you used to have, luckily, but the concept of med school still scares me. I sure hope you get through everything well!

  6. #36
    Senior Member King sns's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by intuitiveadrenalinejunkie View Post
    hey, im infj wondering about becoming a doctor... there are obvious things in the profession which appeal to me - however, i have some concerns with the rather strong Sensing aspect of the work detail...

    so are there any infj's around who are doctors? and who can tell me how they experience it?

    thanks a bunch!
    hmm.. I think that an INFJ is a very great personality for a doctor. Being such a high stakes and involved profession, nobody is going to master it immediately. Those S traits that you need will naturally be obtained in med school. If you're a decent and intelligent person, I highly doubt you'll go around accidentally killing people due to "not enough s." Just take it day by day and you'll be surprised about how much you will step up to the plate when you need to. Doctors require a high level of N qualities as well as S qualities, so like I said, nobody will fit the bill immediately without some training.
    06/13 10:51:03 five sounds: you!!!
    06/13 10:51:08 shortnsweet: no you!!
    06/13 10:51:12 shortnsweet: go do your things and my things too!
    06/13 10:51:23 five sounds: oh hell naw
    06/13 10:51:55 shortnsweet: !!!!
    06/13 10:51:57 shortnsweet: (cries)
    06/13 10:52:19 RiftsWRX: You two are like furbies stuck in a shoe box

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  7. #37
    Senior Member King sns's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Careberryz View Post
    Hey all. This is my first time posting anything anywhere besides facebook, so I feel a bit shy :P. I heard about MBTI a long time ago but I've only really understood my INFJ self for the last year or so after my friend re-introduced me to MBTI and I've been acting sort of like an MBTI prophet, trying to convince everyone I get a chance to interact with, friends and acquaintances.

    I am responding to this thread because my day job is a third year medical student at a very "old school" medical school on the east coast, and boy have I had a rough time for a long time, and I know I'm still in the midst of it all, can't really see the end of the tunnel yet.

    So I'll start from the beginning. Why did I go into medicine? In all honesty, for a mix of reasons, good and "bad", their order of importance constantly shifting according to where I am in life and how I'm feeling. (1) I've always wanted to do some nameless big and great something for the world and humanity yadda yadda. Well you get the pictures. I thought medicine would fulfill my humanitarian instincts. (2) I love interacting with people on a meaningful basis. Sometimes I hate them, and I need more than my fair share of solitude, but god I love people as a whole. (3) Science/medicine is interesting. Not interesting enough to be the only subject I study day in and day out, unfortunately, but interesting. (4) Ah, prestige and respect from others. Oh yeah, baby. I am a bit bipolar in that I both love myself and hate myself simultaneously, and there is something about the prestige of medicine that really fuels/fueled my ego (not sure if my ego's really being fed at all at the present, but maybe a little from, like, the little old lady at the store who automatically likes you when she accidentally finds out you're going to be a doctor). (5) My parents but mostly my mom encouraged it. Not going to lie. (6) Enough money to live comfortably/more than comfortably. Of course! Though honestly, there must be an easier way to get into this salary bracket than this.

    My academic career, in terms of how well I did, has sort of been up and down. Did well in public high school. Got into a college with good name. College was seriously hard. Took a punch, though tamed by grade inflation. Didn't have high enough grades to get into med school. Did a special post-bac program, got really good grades that year, got into med school. First year of med school pretty easy. Second year ridiculously hard, inundated with information and didn't study very hard.

    About not studying very hard...you know, I'm not sure if I'm just particularly a lazy INFJ or if I developed bad habits early on, but I spent many years sort of cramming and then forgetting. I did best on my SATs, which required just "cracking" the test to excel. The MCATs were a little harder--you actually had to know some concepts. And the USMLE, ooo, not so hot. The more "specialized" the exams got, the more my ass got kicked. Call me crazy, but it's not really until now, in my clinicals, when I truly and clearly understand that I need to know sh*t to help people. I thought I would somehow learn everything I needed to know to be a decent doctor through osmosis or even magic, but f*ck, it requires sweat and blood and tears. And I don't think I invested enough of those bodily fluids into learning what I needed to know before I got into the clinic. And now, even when it's obvious how important it is that I know stuff, it's hard for me to work SO HARD for SO many hours at work before coming home to work some more??, and I have so much to make up for from years of nonchalance regarding my academics. Whew.

    So that being said, I'm still surviving, doing the best I can, I have a couple of NF friends here and there in med school, an ENFJ, an INFP, no INFJ though, and a bit of commiseration here and there helps, though only to a certain extent. As an INFJ in the hospital, I run into some problems: So I love people, but I'm introverted, so I can't spend too much time with people without going crazy, and all you do at work is interact with people. My N is raging, so my sensing function is way way under-developed. You have no idea how long it took me (and still takes me) to look up lab values and such. I'm not very logical or objective (sometimes I fool people into believing I am because I SOUND logical/objective because I can speak with conviction), but the true a to b to c type of deduction, eh...not my strong suite. I think my J in combination with other aspects of my personality makes me more proud than some other NF types, so I abhor being at the bottom of the hierarchy, being so lost and confused all the time (even the ESTJs admit med school/residency is hard), being criticized unnecessarily, etc.

    There's a lot more I could talk about, but I've procrastinated from studying long enough. One of the things I'm struggling with the most is what specialty to go into. Dare I ask are there niches in medicine where NFs are more heavily represented. Maybe psychiatry? It seems for most specialties, we are in the minority. Sigh, sigh, and sigh.

    Are there other struggling INFJ med students out there? Does any of this ring true? What about INFJ physicians? Is there really a light at the end of the tunnel? And for any young INFJs thinking of going into medicine, hope this description of my experiences are helpful.
    As a nurse I know that you just can't know everything right off the bat, you just can't. (I know doctor/ nurse- completely different profession, but both dealing with patient care.) For me it's easier to learn on a patient to patient basis. You can't possibly memorize everything that they teach you in school. I think it's easier to put the whole thing together and actually become knowledgeable when your beloved patients are at stake. In the moment, you just struggle through it- look things up, and really learn at the end of the day. I don't think this has much to do with your type. Of course, some types are going to have different natural strengths than others- BUT, everyone is going to have to do some struggling to become something great.
    06/13 10:51:03 five sounds: you!!!
    06/13 10:51:08 shortnsweet: no you!!
    06/13 10:51:12 shortnsweet: go do your things and my things too!
    06/13 10:51:23 five sounds: oh hell naw
    06/13 10:51:55 shortnsweet: !!!!
    06/13 10:51:57 shortnsweet: (cries)
    06/13 10:52:19 RiftsWRX: You two are like furbies stuck in a shoe box

    My Nohari
    My Johari
    by sns.

  8. #38
    i love skylights's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mochajava View Post
    I want to know how feelers can get through hostile environments. My last work environment was like that -- getting yelled at a lot for stupid things, and it basically made me shut down. I did not function effectively at all, and I got too burnt out from withstanding the toxic environment that I didn't learn as much as I could have. Any ideas? Think I should start a thread on this?
    the ENFP route: yell back, and then Ne your way out of the corner by demonstrating how the way you're doing things is actually better aligned with the way things should be done.

    seriously though, for me, having a good friend or friends who i can talk to and who i trust to bolster me when things get rough is very helpful to me when i am in a high-stress situation. then i know that even if things are getting difficult, i can trust that person to listen to me, trust me, and help build me back up to fight again. having a friend inside the system who you can commiserate with is good as well - you can have your own contented "bubble" in the hostile environment. i also like thinking about how i can help change that environment.

  9. #39
    On a mission Usehername's Avatar
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    Coming from a huge MD family where everyone went to medical school and then married a classmate, and then their kids are now in medical school, I can weigh in as an observer!

    While I'm certain medicine requires both S and N, the xSxJ and xSxP MDs seem to be happier in their jobs than my xNxx MD relatives.

    ISTJ and ISTP surgeon aunts are happy to live in the operating room (even after each having 4 pregnancies! can you imagine how much their bladders must have hated them?!). ESTJ, ISFJ, ISFJ, they're all satisfied with their jobs. ISFJ of my generation is in med school atm and happy.

    HOWEVER,
    My INTJorENTP (he's hard to type like Night) uncle very seriously tried convince his wife to OK him quitting his job and become a long distance trucker where he could listen to podcasts all day because he was deathly bored and swapped too many specializations, all of which required a lot of detail-oriented work and repetitive tasks that weren't challenging him.

    His wife, my INFJ aunt, is a psychiatrist. She sort of shrugs about her career choice, and assures me that while it has its great moments, she's largely working the bureaucracy more than the patients. And gives the impression that she didn't exactly find a career where she could live her passion to the extent that she dreamed.

    My INTJ uncle is a radiologist married to one of the surgeon aunts who never has to see his patients and has limited social skills; he seems to love his job.

    ISTP kid of the double intuitive parents was premed and had the grades to get in, but chose to go another route because the life of an MD sucks. Her dad is still doing two weeks of night shifts as a highly ranked fellow because that is the life of a doctor. She eventually realized, presumably through her parents, that she wanted to be able to clock out and go snowboarding.


    Basically, the relatives that do well with being a doctor have no lives outside of it and their identity highly invested in their career. The ones that were more socially and otherwise (e.g. musician) multidimensional struggled and didn't see the point of clocking so many hours at the same old thing. You're caught up in a giant bureaucracy. Though you can use intuition at times, mostly you are an (important!) cog in the system that prevents old people from dying a little quicker than they otherwise might.
    *You don't have a soul. You are a Soul. You have a body.
    *Faith is the art of holding on to things your reason once accepted, despite your changing moods.
    C.S. Lewis

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Usehername View Post
    Basically, the relatives that do well with being a doctor have no lives outside of it and their identity highly invested in their career. The ones that were more socially and otherwise (e.g. musician) multidimensional struggled and didn't see the point of clocking so many hours at the same old thing. You're caught up in a giant bureaucracy.
    o___________o

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