User Tag List

First 1234 Last

Results 11 to 20 of 34

  1. #11
    Senior Member niki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    MBTI
    INFP
    Posts
    210

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by greed View Post
    I just tried to get all of my career goals to line up in the best way possible. I'd been interested in video game design from a young age, and I ended up going into simulation after being left completely unimpressed by engineering. Simulation conceptually overlaps greatly with gaming, it still allows me to be creative and adaptable, and it has an advantage in that it actually pays the bills.

    (I'm toying around with also picking up a side gig as an independent game developer, though.)

    I could get an even higher-paying job if I went corporate, but I would then lose the level of flexibility and the good environment that I have now. So that's where I have drawn the line.
    if I may know,
    what do you do now?
    and how did you able to get into the 'fantastic' job that you're having now?
    perhaps i could also get inspired from your reply/advices.
    thanks

  2. #12
    Intriguing.... Quinlan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    MBTI
    ISFP
    Enneagram
    9w1
    Socionics
    Booo
    Posts
    3,005

    Default

    If you are "doing what you love" then you will have a clear edge on others in your field that are just there for the money, therefore success and probably money will follow from loving that work.

    The problem is almost no one becomes an artist for the money (hah!) so the whole field is full of people who love it. So love for art is common amongest people in that field so goes unrewarded but genuine love for something like finance/property trading/beancounting etc. is much rarer and will get noticed and rewarded in job interviews and promotions so money will follow.

    So really it should be "do what you love and money will follow (within the context of fields where true passion is lacking)"
    Act your age not your enneagram number.

    Quinlan's Creations

  3. #13
    garbage
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by niki View Post
    if I may know,
    what do you do now?
    and how did you able to get into the 'fantastic' job that you're having now?
    perhaps i could also get inspired from your reply/advices.
    thanks
    University researcher, specializing in simulation. Well, "specializing" in simulation is a somewhat odd concept since simulation is broad-based and covers a variety of environments and subject matter. I've worked with shuttle risk assessments, patent trends, missiles, weather, psychology, coursework development, tools for hospitals.. the list goes on.

    I was studying engineering and co-opping for a local engineering company, and I hated it. Toward the end of my degree, I just decided to shift gears, and I'd heard that one of my professors was into simulation. I figured I might want to give that a try.

    I emailed him and asked about a potential position in the research center that employed him, and I got hired on as an undergraduate student assistant. I got paid much less than I did at my previous job, but part of me knew where it was going to take me. It was a risk, nonetheless.

    I graduated and decided to stick with it. Started my master's degree program and became a graduate research assistant, and shortly switched over to a full-time position. That was a risk, too, since it was unheard of for a research center to employ non-Ph.D.'s to full-time positions. I worked very hard as a full-time employee and a full-time student, and eventually graduated while rising through the ranks some more. Upon graduation, I started pursuing a Ph.D. with our research center's director as my advisor. I'm set to graduate in three years or so, depending on my pacing.

    Non-Ph.D. researchers don't make nearly as much as their colleagues out in the corporate workforce, but the Ph.D.'s are very greatly valued in research. That's what I'm banking on, just as I'd banked on simulation being a good fit for me and taking on a full-time position being a good choice.


    You'll notice here that the common theme all along has been taking a few risks, working my ass off, doing a bit of forward planning, and sacrificing somewhat for future gain. I could have easily entered the engineering workforce at twice what I initially made at the research center, but I would have hated it in the long run.

    Within the past year, I've finally gotten to a position where I can slow down a bit. I'm still thinking about the future to a certain extent, but I'm more lax about it. It takes a long while and a lot of effort to get to that position.

  4. #14
    morose bourgeoisie
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    MBTI
    INFP
    Posts
    3,859

    Default

    All I have to say is that if you don't engage in your passion for a purpose higher than money, you may as well not do it at all...music is about love, but also about self-sacrifice.
    And nobody cares what Beethoven was worth when he died.

  5. #15
    full of love Kingfisher's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    MBTI
    ESFP
    Enneagram
    9w8
    Posts
    1,687

    Default

    i don't think doing what you love and making money are tied to each other at all. sometimes they are compatible, sometimes not.
    the real question is whether or not you have the strength to keep doing what you love, even when it is utterly failing financially.

  6. #16
    Senior Member Galusha's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    MBTI
    ENTJ
    Enneagram
    7?
    Posts
    204

    Default

    I love making money. I will use the money to do things I love more than working, like traveling. if everyone does what they like, no one will take up the crappy jobs, and society will fall apart. just think of your unsavory way of making money as maintaining the base of society. good job!

  7. #17
    Senior Member INTJMom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Posts
    5,349

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by niki View Post
    ...
    that's why, along with that, now I also can't be completly agree with the popular saying (especially in those self-help & motivational books) :
    "you gotta do what you love, and money will come"
    this even including the famous Robert Kiyosaki & Donald Trump, saying this!

    my take on that is, no, when you DO what you LOVE, it will not always yield a lot, and big amount of money!
    in fact, some jobs/careers are just 'that' .....they still leave you with financial burdens, and even, lacking financially! I believe this is also a fact that most of us probably have also observed in reality, isn't it?

    some jobs gives you huge money, in relatively quicker, easier ways.
    while some other jobs give you less/lack of money, BUT, perhaps the 'good' trade-off is other things, and usually unseen, ie: happiness, lack of stress level, befriend with a lot variety of interesting people, experiencing new things, freedom to wander around, etc.

    what do you guys think on this one?
    and which one would u choose (or have already chosen) ??
    please share your opinion.
    I agree with you.
    Doing what you love doesn't guarantee an income large enough to live on.
    It depends on what you love, I guess.
    I love music, but it's extremely difficult to live on the income unless you become a big recording and performing artist.

    I am at a place in my life where I now have to enter the full-time work force, and I am struggling with what direction to take.
    At first I was looking at the "high-pay, in-demand" in my state, but then I realized that all those jobs also have high-stress, and at my age, that's probably not the right thing for me... even if I am "smart enough" to learn how to do those things.
    I think I'd rather learn to live on a modest income and have a lower stress job.

    However, I still want to do something I "love". I certainly wouldn't want to do something I'd hate! How much will I love it? A little, I hope.

  8. #18
    Senior Member niki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    MBTI
    INFP
    Posts
    210

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nebbykoo View Post
    All I have to say is that if you don't engage in your passion for a purpose higher than money, you may as well not do it at all...music is about love, but also about self-sacrifice.
    And nobody cares what Beethoven was worth when he died.
    i love what you said there.
    thanks for reminding me again..
    it's just that sometimes, I feel that I've gotta be 'practical' too, even in the field that I love,
    but I believe that even when my music won't "sell" , it's not like I'm going down to the road of starvation 'till dying..
    'cuz I know that it's not that bad, based from a lot of testimonies from my musician friends, from "zero to hero" !
    so I know it's possible to get financially-enough from music, but not super-rich (unless if I'm extremely very lucky, but then again, making music should not be solely about that, ie: desperately want to be famous).


    Quote Originally Posted by greed View Post
    University researcher, specializing in simulation. Well, "specializing" in simulation is a somewhat odd concept since simulation is broad-based and covers a variety of environments and subject matter. I've worked with shuttle risk assessments, patent trends, missiles, weather, psychology, coursework development, tools for hospitals.. the list goes on.

    I was studying engineering and co-opping for a local engineering company, and I hated it. Toward the end of my degree, I just decided to shift gears, and I'd heard that one of my professors was into simulation. I figured I might want to give that a try.

    I emailed him and asked about a potential position in the research center that employed him, and I got hired on as an undergraduate student assistant. I got paid much less than I did at my previous job, but part of me knew where it was going to take me. It was a risk, nonetheless.

    I graduated and decided to stick with it. Started my master's degree program and became a graduate research assistant, and shortly switched over to a full-time position. That was a risk, too, since it was unheard of for a research center to employ non-Ph.D.'s to full-time positions. I worked very hard as a full-time employee and a full-time student, and eventually graduated while rising through the ranks some more. Upon graduation, I started pursuing a Ph.D. with our research center's director as my advisor. I'm set to graduate in three years or so, depending on my pacing.

    Non-Ph.D. researchers don't make nearly as much as their colleagues out in the corporate workforce, but the Ph.D.'s are very greatly valued in research. That's what I'm banking on, just as I'd banked on simulation being a good fit for me and taking on a full-time position being a good choice.


    You'll notice here that the common theme all along has been taking a few risks, working my ass off, doing a bit of forward planning, and sacrificing somewhat for future gain. I could have easily entered the engineering workforce at twice what I initially made at the research center, but I would have hated it in the long run.

    Within the past year, I've finally gotten to a position where I can slow down a bit. I'm still thinking about the future to a certain extent, but I'm more lax about it. It takes a long while and a lot of effort to get to that position.
    thanks a lot for sharing this, greed!
    yes, those things you've mentioned seems to be the common theme , the ingredients for "success".
    if i may ask, though, referring to "forward planning",
    have you ever , at one point of time, or several points of time perhaps,
    have a lot of unsure, doubts, and uncertainty, and FEAR if what you're planning would turn out to be WRONG choice ??..
    if yes, then how did you eliminate these annoyingly-negative feelings?
    because this is what making me often procrastinate so much,
    fear if i've invested a lot of time, efforts, energy, and Planning,
    only to find that it's probably a DEAD-end, or WRONG path at the end
    (ie: "I shouldn't have taken this road, and wasted my time doing this") ?...
    how to make yourself very sure of your own Plannings?
    did you do a lot of researches? (but if only research & research, but not dare to take risks to DO it, then it's also going to be a series of meaningless, endless-researches?) , or just kinda "go with the flow" ?
    what is the best here?
    thanks.

  9. #19
    Senior Member Scott N Denver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    4w5
    Posts
    2,899

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by greed View Post
    University researcher, specializing in simulation. Well, "specializing" in simulation is a somewhat odd concept since simulation is broad-based and covers a variety of environments and subject matter. I've worked with shuttle risk assessments, patent trends, missiles, weather, psychology, coursework development, tools for hospitals.. the list goes on.
    Could what you do be accurately described as "numerical simulation" or "numerical approximation"? Would it be stuff like Finite elements, ODE modeling, PDE modeling, lots of linear algebra??? Most things that I've seen that get "modeled" are usually situations described with ODE/PDE. I wish I knew more about stuff like that. I'm working on learning more about it.

    Thanks!
    Scott

  10. #20
    garbage
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by niki View Post
    if i may ask, though, referring to "forward planning",
    have you ever , at one point of time, or several points of time perhaps,
    have a lot of unsure, doubts, and uncertainty, and FEAR if what you're planning would turn out to be WRONG choice ??..
    Always.

    I'm not certain of a lot. And when I'm very sure of something, I end up questioning why I'm so sure of it, so I end up doubting it. I can see situations from all possible angles, including how they might completely and utterly fail.

    All I can do is.. well, do it anyway.

    I had a lot of anxiety about buying my place while I was jobless. I wasn't sure whether taking on a full-time research position was a good idea. I was anxious about what I was going to do when I graduated with my masters; whether I'd have to move to find decent work.

    With most of these decisions, I collected all of the data that I could. It was my safety blanket. It was reassuring. But the data I had to collect with each decision dwindled as I began to trust myself.

    How do you get over it? Just do something. Practice just.. making decisions. An analogy that I will often repeat: It's easier to steer a car in the right direction if it's actually moving.

    Turns out it's not so bad once you get it going, but starting the engine and easing onto the gas for the first time can be nerve-wracking.

    It's hard, I know. I've been paralyzed by indecision more times than I can count.

    Have you ever faced a situation where you've got a huge list of chores that need to be done, but then you start one and end up knocking the rest out? It's kind of the same principle.

    Quote Originally Posted by Scott N Denver View Post
    Could what you do be accurately described as "numerical simulation" or "numerical approximation"? Would it be stuff like Finite elements, ODE modeling, PDE modeling, lots of linear algebra??? Most things that I've seen that get "modeled" are usually situations described with ODE/PDE. I wish I knew more about stuff like that. I'm working on learning more about it.
    There's a lot of math in what I do, but methods such as finite element modeling and differential equations are just a few simulation techniques that are available. I'd love to talk about this kind of thing some more.. maybe I'll start a(nother) blog..

    I also don't just do simulation.. there's a lot of business development, talking to customers, logistics.. so on and so forth. Par for the course when you take on lots of short-term projects.

Similar Threads

  1. [MBTItm] What do you Love and What do you Hate About NTs?
    By Tigerlily in forum The NF Idyllic (ENFP, INFP, ENFJ, INFJ)
    Replies: 70
    Last Post: 09-20-2014, 06:11 PM
  2. "Do what you love, and money will follow"
    By mujigay in forum Academics and Careers
    Replies: 76
    Last Post: 10-30-2011, 03:02 PM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-06-2009, 01:01 PM
  4. [NF] Fe and Fi, say what you love about your F function!
    By BlueScreen in forum The NF Idyllic (ENFP, INFP, ENFJ, INFJ)
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 11-17-2008, 06:25 PM
  5. People You Love and Admire
    By Mempy in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 44
    Last Post: 10-06-2008, 09:59 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO