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  1. #171
    The High Priestess Amargith's Avatar
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    We're thin-skinned since we're more in tune with emotions. We pick up on the smallest flicker, which means that if you throw a frigging truck-load of bad emotions at us we're going to suffer more from it than those who didn't notice the flicker in the first place

    And this also explains the need to be liked. If you can constantly pick up on anyone feeling slightly annoyed with you (even if it's just coz of one sentence you said and after they don't give it another thought and therefore in general might even like you), it makes you acutely aware of this. Since it's not a pleasant sensation, you try to avoid it from happening again.

    As for moods, sorry, but NTs are just as prone to those as we are, it's just expressed differently ime. Same goes for depression or stress.
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    "Harm none, do as ye will”

  2. #172
    meh Salomé's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Antisocial one View Post
    All of this sounds nice but this is not the real problem.
    ....
    In a way I am after your emotional baggage
    Err. Who has the problem here?

    Since people were hidding bad emotions. (at least that is how that looked like me)
    Why don't you tell us more about your mother?




    What was I saying about NTs being straightforward?
    Yeah, scratch that.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
    Gosh, the world looks so small from up here on my high horse of menstruation.

  3. #173
    meh Salomé's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amargith
    And this also explains the need to be liked. If you can constantly pick up on anyone feeling slightly annoyed with you (even if it's just coz of one sentence you said and after they don't give it another thought and therefore in general might even like you), it makes you acutely aware of this. Since it's not a pleasant sensation, you try to avoid it from happening again.
    False. I know certain people dislike me. I couldn't give a damn. Haven't you heard that you can't please all of the people all of the time?
    Also, you seem to go out of your way to annoy some people.
    As for moods, sorry, but NTs are just as prone to those as we are, it's just expressed differently ime. Same goes for depression or stress.
    True.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
    Gosh, the world looks so small from up here on my high horse of menstruation.

  4. #174
    The High Priestess Amargith's Avatar
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    I've learned a long time ago that you indeed can't please everyone. Those that you cannot please no matter what you do, I don't bother with anymore. Wasted energy, really. I don't ever go out of my way to annoy people, but if who I am annoys them, and I know that nothing can change that, I stop caring and be mindful of their quirks and preferences.

    I'm sure you can tell when someone dislikes you. But I doubt you pick up on every subtle emotion you cause in others and actually feel what they feel or are probably feeling . Otherwise I'm pretty sure you would care.
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  5. #175
    Boring old fossil Night's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amargith View Post
    We're thin-skinned since we're more in tune with emotions.
    This is an interesting point, Amargith.

    Does familiarity with emotion necessarily presume vulnerability to emotion?

    Could it be conversely argued that comfort with emotional expression should instead permeate a sense of resilience, and not susceptibility?

  6. #176
    The High Priestess Amargith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Night View Post
    This is an interesting point, Amargith.

    Does familiarity with emotion necessarily presume vulnerability to emotion?

    Could it be conversely argued that comfort with emotional expression should instead permeate a sense of resilience, and not susceptibility?
    Compare it to a dog who is way more sensitive to high-pitched noises than we are. If then you produce a high pitched and very loud noise..who's going to suffer most, do you think?

    On the other hand, produce a very soft high pitched noise, and the dog will be the one to pick up on it. Not us.



    And...I'd also argue that those who have learned to deal with this 'sensitivity' (aka are more mature), will be able to deal with it better at a higher intensity than those who have never had to deal with it and are suddenly exposed to it. Example: the intensity/rush of feelings of a crush or love.
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  7. #177
    Boring old fossil Night's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amargith View Post
    Compare it to a dog who is way more sensitive to high-pitched noises than we are. If then you produce a high pitched and very loud noise..who's going to suffer most, do you think?

    On the other hand, produce a very soft high pitched noise, and the dog will be the one to pick up on it. Not us.
    That's more-or-less the response I was driving for; it makes sense that saturation of trait expression is likely linked to individual diversity in experience.

    That is to say, a F will have a higher probability of a nonlinear approach to emotion, whereas an T will have a greater chance of adopting a creative outlook towards reason.

    This principle is certainly more anecdotal than rational; moreover, it shouldn't imply that diversity in experience will automatically translate to success in practice. It's kind of a truism, but I think it holds water.

    Know what I mean?

  8. #178
    Queen hunter Virtual ghost's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Night View Post
    This is an interesting point, Amargith.

    Does familiarity with emotion necessarily presume vulnerability to emotion?

    I think that this correct. Since you need emotion to accept and understand emotion. (if we overlook the most basic ones).

  9. #179
    The High Priestess Amargith's Avatar
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    ..I think I do


    Basically, being sensitive to emotions has the added danger of getting 'too close to the fire' and getting burned that way.
    I doubt logic holds the same amount of danger for NTs
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  10. #180
    Boring old fossil Night's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amargith View Post
    I doubt logic holds the same amount of same danger for NTs
    Actually, I think for some folks, the availability and sensitivity to conducting a 'logical approach' to life can be paralytic.

    The desire (urgency) to behave reasonably can intellectually freeze behavior, both as an expression of contemplation and insecurity at the notion of failure (being 'illogical' in thought/practice).

    Of course, this methodology suffers from the same extremism as the 'thin-skinned' ideology currently under review. Intensity of focus and efficiency in movement don't always march in cadence; more often than not, the greater visibility one has, at some point, must successfully integrate with mechanical effort for it to have real-world 'relevance' - both in external reinforcement for the user and real-time application for his theories.

    Unless satisfaction is derived from the relationship between paralysis and wisdom. Fleshing this connection is probably more about what one seeks on an individual level.

    Quote Originally Posted by Antisocial one View Post
    I think that this correct. Since you need emotion to accept and understand emotion. (if we overlook the most basic ones).
    Thanks -

    What do you think of Amargith's counterpoint? Does emotion/logic exist on a continuum where one's 'ideal' frame of reference is centered on moderation in awareness?

    That is to say, do people who know a 'good amount' have a greater chance at implementation than those who only have a slight -or- profound understanding of either/both trait? (Think of the Bell Curve and real world success)

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