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Thread: NF and ADD

  1. #11
    Senior Member prplchknz's Avatar
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    I did terribly academically. Doctors and teacher's all tried to label me by second grade, if they had asked me what I thought about school. I would have said I hated it. I don't think my bad grades was my inabilty to focus or unable to grasp the concepts. I think I didn't care enough to do the work. I also had bad test anxiety. I would never study because I'd inevitably forget the answers. My desk was messy, as was my back pack. My parents were even told in middle school to get me a laptop for all my notes and homework. I refused, I didn't like being the odd one out. My point is not all children who do bad at school have some disabilty. maybe they can't see the point of half the crap.

  2. #12
    Aspie Idealist TaylorS's Avatar
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    I'll guess that ADHD correlates with ESxP while non-hyperactive ADD correlates with INxP.
    Autistic INFP


  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by ptgatsby View Post
    So, for example, while OCD might correlate to J quite strongly, it doesn't mean that Js will correlate strongly to OCD.
    Sorry to pick a nit here pt, but what defenition of correlation are you using?

    I tried to find a website regarding social research, incase it was different from what I was familiar with.

    Correlation

    Unless you're working in a system where commutativity doesn't hold, it seems to me, that you can swap x and y in the formula for r, and get the same answer as before.

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  4. #14
    Senior Member ptgatsby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ygolo View Post
    Sorry to pick a nit here pt, but what defenition of correlation are you using?

    I tried to find a website regarding social research, incase it was different from what I was familiar with.

    Correlation

    Unless you're working in a system where commutativity doesn't hold, it seems to me, that you can swap x and y in the formula for r, and get the same answer as before.
    Correlations remain intact within the data set, yes. So, you are correct in the sense that if you take 100 data points and it turns out that it is perfectly correlated, then it should be perfectly correlated in reverse. However, this only remains true while the relationships exist. Think of it like having multiple datasets - the exact correlation only exists within the data. If there is bias in one of the sets, the corelations will be skewed from the others.

    An obvious example would be to get a whole bunch of teens together, seperate the ones that have had sex, then ask if they think sex at their age is ok... It's safe to say that "teens that have sex think having sex is ok!"... not so safe to say "Teens think that having sex is ok!" just because they came from the "Teen group". However, the correlation does remain, it's just diffused.

    If you take 1000 data points, eliminate 900 of them because they don't fall in what you are measuring (ie: 10% of Js are OCDs, but take only the OCDs for analysis), then see is those 100 are highly correlated to OCD, it is easy to conclude that Js are likely OCDs. In truth, OCD->J might be 100% predictive while J->OCD might only be 10% predictive.

    The correlation remains, yes, but the sample is biased (the key word being "strongly" in my OP that you quoted - the correlation is diffused when you consider the master group.)

  5. #15
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
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    OCD and ADD are not mutually exclusive and I will not say how I happen to know that.
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
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  6. #16
    darkened dreams labyrinthine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GZA View Post
    What are you're thoughts on NF's and ADD?
    Specifically ADD (not ADHD) sounds a bit similar to who i was when younger: the daydreaming, compliance, overpoliteness, etc.

    Even now i'll run an errand to Target to see if they have a bigger size of a really cute shirt i picked up at another location, will start analyzing something in my mind while driving, manage to find a decent parking space, get out, and realize I'm at Macy's.

    Sometimes my absent-mindedness gets really frustrating.
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    I want to be just like my mother, even if she is bat-shit crazy.

  7. #17
    Aspie Idealist TaylorS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cafe View Post
    OCD and ADD are not mutually exclusive and I will not say how I happen to know that.


    I know, I have both. Fortunately my OCD isn't of the extreme "washing my hands every 5 minute" type.
    Autistic INFP


  8. #18
    Aspie Idealist TaylorS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by toonia View Post
    Specifically ADD (not ADHD) sounds a bit similar to who i was when younger: the daydreaming, compliance, overpoliteness, etc.

    Even now i'll run an errand to Target to see if they have a bigger size of a really cute shirt i picked up at another location, will start analyzing something in my mind while driving, manage to find a decent parking space, get out, and realize I'm at Macy's.

    Sometimes my absent-mindedness gets really frustrating.
    :yim_rolling_on_the_
    Autistic INFP


  9. #19
    Senior Member Vortex's Avatar
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    I don't think I have ADD, but looking over the symptoms list I recognize almost all the points. I can also see how it'd correspond to others in my social circle I believe to be NF.

    Without any data or anything to back me up I believe that a lot of people are misdiagnosed. It seems to me that one could easily turn distinctive character traits into an illness, when one consults the list of symptoms.

  10. #20
    Senior Member celesul's Avatar
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    ADD isn't just having certain traits, it's the degree that one has them. If you have all of the traits but can function perfectly well in society, then you don't have ADD. It's ADD if you show enough symptom at home, with friends, and at school or work. If you only show symptoms in one situation, then it's probably just your personality. Or if you only show symptoms at school or work, then you're probably bored.

    About all disorders rely on situation and degree. If your symptoms don't interfere with functioning, you don't have whatever the disorder is that requires it to interfere with functioning. (ex. Most people can be pretty obsessive, like maybe after they scratch one arm they feel they have to scratch the other in the exact same spot. A bit odd, but not OCD. It in no way interferes with funtioning.)
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