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  1. #21
    Was E.laur Laurie's Avatar
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    Know your topic and focus on the knowledge you are imparting. That's all that really matters.

    I used to have trouble looking all freaked out. (speech class in college) The teacher said to just keep pushing forward and ignore how freaked my body was. Ahaha!

    I got over it when I had to do a speech to all the co-ops and my boss at Goodyear. It was sooo stressful that I had to find a way to overcome it.

    I think INFP could be awesome at public speaking but like everyone else would have to warm up to the idea.

  2. #22
    darkened dreams labyrinthine's Avatar
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    I'm in the performing arts by profession and had to work through performance anxiety. I think there can be advantages and disadvantages for the INFP type. The following are a few things that caused my anxiety.

    1. The social environment: Being in a highly competitive environment in which both success and failure in performance had negative social consequences of different sorts was one source of anxiety. I would tend to focus on possible social outcomes. Knowing other people to be competitive and primarily desiring their own success results in them often feeling badly if someone else does well. Failure shames mentors and peers who identify with the performer. A performance generates many complex social and emotional outcomes. Because of this environments like church were actually worse than the university and professional settings if I knew there were going to be social consequences I didn't want to deal with.

    2. Instinctual awareness: The act of having a group of individuals staring at you while you perform a task has good reason to trigger fight or flight instincts. Staring in nature typically means you are going to be eaten or chased off someone's territory. Staring is equivalent to aggression in nature. For whatever reason human society creates activities in which this is not the case, but there is still an element of judgment that occurs. When you add a dark room, bright spotlight, and loud applause, the instincts can be further triggered.

    A couple of things that can help include rigorous preparation of both the materials and the performance/speech. These are two different activities. Performing is a social activity that must be practiced in its own right in order to be prepared. Planning gradual steps between where you are now and where you need to be to give the speech is important. Perform for a friend, then a group, then in the setting in which you will have to give it, etc. If I have an important performance, I find a way to execute it at least 5-10 times in other settings. Nursing homes are great for practicing because they are appreciative and sweet about it in most cases. It also helps to focus on whatever few or many people will get something positive out of it and try to dismiss the negative reactions from the mind. Also, giving oneself permission to fail helps - it's actually okay to be human. I also try to imagine my own reaction if someone else fails. If I know my reaction to be kind and fair, then I know that is possible from others as well. Realize how much will stay the same in you life - the people who love you will still love you, whatever skill you possess is still present inside, etc.
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  3. #23
    Resident Snot-Nose GZA's Avatar
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    I'm usually fine... I'm quite certain I've overcome all nervousness when performing or speaking publically, and I'm usually decent at preparing something and improvising, so I feel comfortable.

  4. #24
    See Right Through Me Bubbles's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by toonia View Post
    I'm in the performing arts by profession and had to work through performance anxiety. I think there can be advantages and disadvantages for the INFP type. The following are a few things that caused my anxiety.

    1. The social environment: Being in a highly competitive environment in which both success and failure in performance had negative social consequences of different sorts was one source of anxiety. I would tend to focus on possible social outcomes. Knowing other people to be competitive and primarily desiring their own success results in them often feeling badly if someone else does well. Failure shames mentors and peers who identify with the performer. A performance generates many complex social and emotional outcomes. Because of this environments like church were actually worse than the university and professional settings if I knew there were going to be social consequences I didn't want to deal with.

    2. Instinctual awareness: The act of having a group of individuals staring at you while you perform a task has good reason to trigger fight or flight instincts. Staring in nature typically means you are going to be eaten or chased off someone's territory. Staring is equivalent to aggression in nature. For whatever reason human society creates activities in which this is not the case, but there is still an element of judgment that occurs. When you add a dark room, bright spotlight, and loud applause, the instincts can be further triggered.

    A couple of things that can help include rigorous preparation of both the materials and the performance/speech. These are two different activities. Performing is a social activity that must be practiced in its own right in order to be prepared. Planning gradual steps between where you are now and where you need to be to give the speech is important. Perform for a friend, then a group, then in the setting in which you will have to give it, etc. If I have an important performance, I find a way to execute it at least 5-10 times in other settings. Nursing homes are great for practicing because they are appreciative and sweet about it in most cases. It also helps to focus on whatever few or many people will get something positive out of it and try to dismiss the negative reactions from the mind. Also, giving oneself permission to fail helps - it's actually okay to be human. I also try to imagine my own reaction if someone else fails. If I know my reaction to be kind and fair, then I know that is possible from others as well. Realize how much will stay the same in you life - the people who love you will still love you, whatever skill you possess is still present inside, etc.
    Okay, I just wanted to say, wow. This is a great post, toonia. It puts things so clearly; it'd help anyone wanting to improve their speech skills, I think. Just wanted to give you props... ^^;
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  5. #25
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    I have had one manager whom I was pretty sure was an INFP. Could not hold a continuous train of thought when he was on the podium, and would basically speak in indecipherable fragmented sentences.

    After reading this thread, now I understand why! Serious performance anxiety I guess.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by DigitalMethod View Post
    Like BlackCat said I don't think it's really a type thing either.

    If anything, I think if the INFP could somehow put their passion into what they are speaking about they would perform a lot better than the average Joe.
    i agree with this

    Gandhi (who was most probably an INFP) was one of the best public speakers in the 20th century. he managed to make almost all Indians rally around the Indian flag and RALLY against the British one.

    India was the only country who managed to Protest the British Empire out of their country. and they used non violent ways. nobody got hurt(sounds INFP doesn't it?).

    the British Empire started leaving all Asian coutries only after they left INDIA.so basically GANDHI won the independence for all asian counties, including mine.


    ANYWAY,
    is was not ONLY his public speaking abilities it was also his "passion into what they are speaking about" which managed to achieve his goal.

    so i have to that with a little bit of practice INFPs make world class public speakers.

  7. #27
    reborn PeaceBaby's Avatar
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    Since public speaking is the number one fear of ALL people, I don't think being an effective one is isolated to any particular MBTI type.

    As an INFP, I would say I am nervous prior to getting started, but I can talk to a group of 5 or sing in front of 500 as required. Reading the audience during speeches / performances is a great asset, but it can be distracting if you sense you are not getting your message across. But I would rather be able to sense the temperature of the room than not!

    I have been told I seem very relaxed and comfortable, and particularly while speaking, some of my comedic side seems to come out and I try to enjoy, even relish, the experience and trust my verbal skills. I make an effort to get the adrenalin working for me rather than against me.

    I agree with toonia that some venues are easier than others. When I am singing at church for some reason that is one of the places where I have the most stage fright. Perhaps it is because I am revealing more of my authentic self and that feels scarier, more dangerous than in a play or a meeting at work where I am playing more of a role.

  8. #28
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    I teach public speaking and have personally experienced even the most socially gregarious students falter during a speech. One recently was an ESTJ who couldn't contain himself during discussion or arguments, but nervously stammered and "uhh"-ed and "uhhmm"-ed his way through most of his speeches.

    I don't really get to know my students well enough to suss out the INFPs, but I've had plenty of quiet IFP or IFJ seeming girls that did just fine in their speeches.

    Speaking for myself, I'm actually a pretty terrible public speaker (luckily you don't have to be a master performer in order to teach kids how to be discriminating in their language use, how to critique speeches as texts, or how to organize research for a speech). I've been known to speak in half sentences or sentence fragments, retract statements that I haven't yet made, be vague, and use big hand gestures to say little things. Then when people look at me like I'm crazy, I get flustered and embarrassed and decide not to speak again unless I have a clear idea of the words that I need to use beforehand.
    Artes, Scientia, Veritasiness

  9. #29
    Member Gengar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Orangey View Post
    I've been known to speak in half sentences or sentence fragments, retract statements that I haven't yet made, be vague, and use big hand gestures to say little things. Then when people look at me like I'm crazy, I get flustered and embarrassed and decide not to speak again unless I have a clear idea of the words that I need to use beforehand.
    You'd make a fine politician in Hong Kong

  10. #30
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    I have learned to be relatively comfortable in front of people (instead of puking in the bathroom afterward like I used to do!) I do a really good job with public speaking when I plan ahead. However, I still have to look at foreheads and not eyes. (Best advice I ever got.) My public speaking teacher disagreed, but this is the only trick that could ever help me do a good job. If I look at people's eyes, I assume they're thinking all kinds of horrible things about me and that I suck.

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