User Tag List

123 Last

Results 1 to 10 of 22

  1. #1
    Blah Orangey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    MBTI
    ESTP
    Enneagram
    6w5
    Socionics
    SLE
    Posts
    6,364

    Default INFP Teaching Style

    I just got done reading an extensive teaching description given by an INTJ at some 16types forum and it inspired me to start this thread. I have witnessed the teaching styles of INFJs, INTJs, ENFJ's and ISFJs, but I have yet to actually experience an INFP in the classroom. I am curious to see how INFP teacher descriptions compare to my own experiences with teachers of different types, my personal teaching style, and what I envision would be an INFP teaching style according to what I know (theoretically) about INFPs.

    Therefore, INFPs, if you have taught or are currently teaching, how would you describe your style? And for the purposes of this thread, let's try not to include functions in your descriptions. Just describe what you do, how you do it, and why you do it...as honestly as possible, as though you had never heard of MBTI (as far as that is possible, though I know that it is an impossibility. So please don't waste time reminding me of this fact).

    Oh, and I wasn't sure if I should put this in the NF section or in the academics section, so I chose the former because it gets WAY more traffic.
    Artes, Scientia, Veritasiness

  2. #2
    Blah Orangey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    MBTI
    ESTP
    Enneagram
    6w5
    Socionics
    SLE
    Posts
    6,364

    Default

    And actually, now that I think about it, I would be interested in hearing descriptions from all NFs (or anyone else interested in posting).
    Artes, Scientia, Veritasiness

  3. #3
    Glycerine
    Guest

    Default

    From my experience, they tend to be (I have had 2 INFP English teachers: a male- 2 years, a female- 1 semester):
    very random in discussions... never knew where they would go next.
    Lenient
    Laidback
    strict when grading papers-perfectionists
    truly interested in getting to know students (fairly good at reading people)
    open-minded
    non-conformist- never really had traditional book work
    sensitive to the emotional energy in a room
    calm demeanor/low- energy
    hidden deepness inside (cheesy, I know)
    soft spoken
    thoughtful
    passionate/strong opinions
    disorganized
    try to make the students see from multiple perspectives
    they wanted to have an impact on their students like teaching was their cause

    The male teacher talked a lot about things like the purpose of life, love, death, rejection, epistemology. I guess,in short, the deeper things in life.


    I'm not sure if this is what you're exactly looking for... some points may be a bit irrelevant, sorry.
    Likes The Wailing Specter liked this post

  4. #4
    Senior Member surgery's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    Four
    Posts
    258

    Default

    I suspect my current English professor is an INFP (if not that, definitely still an NF with enneagram type 4). Expectedly, he's really lenient and off beat, which makes him an easy target for mockery (sometimes blatantly in front of him.) Overall, his teaching style is very informal. For example, he uses slang terms, occasionally curses, and addresses us as "cats." When teaching, it seems like he sometimes has trouble articulating his ideas. As a result, the students commonly complain that his assignments are too vague. On the other hand, he does a good job of letting us know that he's ready and willing to go out of the way to help us. Still, I wouldn't say that most of my classmates respect him as good teacher, but they like that class because he's so easy-going and entertaining.
    Not surprisingly, while he tries to be friendly and personable, I think he tries hard to differentiate himself from us. At the beginning of the quarter, he flatly said that he's is not our friend. In class, he regularly focuses his lectures around Facebook to make his them more relevant to us, but will very subtly seem to criticize us for having one, as if he is just way to mature (although, he's only 29) for something so silly. Also, I've noticed that he also has a self-deprecating sense of humor.
    "Why had he never appreciated what a miracle he was, brain and nerve and bounding heart?"

  5. #5
    Blah Orangey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    MBTI
    ESTP
    Enneagram
    6w5
    Socionics
    SLE
    Posts
    6,364

    Default

    That's interesting IDK123 and ofugur, thanks for the responses. I can't say I've ever really had an instructor/prof like that before. Ofugur, is your prof disorganized or organized generally? Does he have notes that he refers to frequently, or is he more free form? Can you usually follow the logic of the class progression? How does he present the material (e.g., powerpoint, lecture, discussion, circle discussion)? I'm interested in knowing if there's a correlation between NF personality preference and a penchant for more radical pedagogy (making the students and the instructor equal in terms of power and so forth).

    I would still like to hear from any of you who teach, though, so that I can get the inside perspective.
    Artes, Scientia, Veritasiness

  6. #6
    Senor Membrane
    Join Date
    May 2008
    MBTI
    INFP
    Posts
    3,190

    Default

    I don't teach but I considered it as a career choice. The reason I would like to teach is that the way I see it, the kids in high school are confused and need some classes where they can think about life and what they would do with it and so on. Maybe some group socializing and stuff like that.

    So, my plan was that now that I have graduated from the media communication, I could take a year to get license to teach also. Then I could start a company that sells the schools "Media Education", which would mean that we make short films with the students and then discuss about them. The idea is to get all the students working for single goal, so that they get a clearer picture about how a team should work. They would get to respect each person of the group for their unique talents (since it takes a wide range of talents to make a short movie). And through the artistic expression and plot development we could discuss about many things that are not being discussed at school.

    I wouldn't even call this teaching, though, since it would be more like shaping their attitudes towards other people and life in general...

  7. #7
    Seriously Delirious Udog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    MBTI
    INfp
    Enneagram
    9w1 sp/sx
    Socionics
    INFp None
    Posts
    5,295

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Orangey View Post
    Therefore, INFPs, if you have taught or are currently teaching, how would you describe your style?
    Quote Originally Posted by Orangey View Post
    Ofugur, is your prof disorganized or organized generally? Does he have notes that he refers to frequently, or is he more free form? Can you usually follow the logic of the class progression? How does he present the material (e.g., powerpoint, lecture, discussion, circle discussion)? I'm interested in knowing if there's a correlation between NF personality preference and a penchant for more radical pedagogy (making the students and the instructor equal in terms of power and so forth).
    I only taught a single semester at a local community college, so I didn't really get a chance to learn from my 'rookie errors', but my thoughts...

    First, I taught "Introduction to C", which is a computer programming class, so I didn't go into the touchy-feely. However, I was at my best when we would get slightly off topic into things that were still computer related, but less detailed-oriented and more big-picture. Oftentimes when we'd get off track I'd lose myself in the conversation with the class and manage to slip in some humor, and during those times I could feel the energy and tell I had their attention. However, I'm pretty good at intuitively sensing the passing of time, so I'd snap out of it and go back to the lecture, killing the energy and momentum I had just generated.

    I think the material was inherently dry (oohh... memory allocation, incrementing FOR loops, sorting arrays.. RIVETING), but I tried my best to explain things in simple terms initially, and build upon them to the more complicated material. To help I often created visual illustrations and used metaphors, with perhaps even overdoing the metaphors. I remember using an egg carton to help explain a two dimensional array, and if I had thought of it I would have hard boiled my eggs and 'accidently' dropped one near a students desk for a bit of a joke. Overall I was very proud of my lectures, and considered it my strength.

    On the minus side, I wasn't really a good lecturer. I felt nervous and tense, and the material inherently doesn't play to my emotional passions, so I was a bit 'off'. Some of that would have gone away with experience, but I didn't really outgrow it during the semester. I preferred MS Power Point (with lecture specific notes on the bottom) and used the chalk board to explain more dynamic things like linked lists, but I pretty much stuck to my lecture as my life line. It didn't help that I didn't write and prep my lecture until the day before, not giving me a chance to practice it. Sadly, that also caused my overall semester structure to be a bit sloppy... something I would correct if I ever taught again.

    I was generally pretty lax in rules that other teachers freak out about. I took attendance, but was up front with my class that they are adults and attendance won't directly affect their grades, but COULD play a role in leniency for border line cases at the end of the semester. Turns out, it did. I had two students get a 59% (failing), one of whom I spent alot of time with, did all their homework, and attended all of the class, and another that only showed up for the tests. I passed one and failed the other. The one that failed asked if there was anything that he could do, after hearing about his final grade, and told him no, his grade stands. I also gathered my paper work together to make my case if he were to try and argue it. (Felt terrible about the whole thing afterward, too.)

    Wow, that grew long. I'll end by saying that I was always open to my students and would go above and beyond to help them with any issues they had. While my end of semester evals hit me hard when it came to lectures, I received top of the line scores for responsiveness and helpfulness.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Anja's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    MBTI
    INFP
    Posts
    2,967

    Default

    I've taught both High School English and various 101 level college classes as a grad assistant.

    My style is pretty obviously INFP. I like interactive teaching and lecturing. It's important to me to get to know my students and I work for individual involvement. I reinforce mutual respect.

    While I value being prepared for each classroom session I tend to be flexible and and open to students' different ideas. A skill I value is to be able to take the various thoughts and draw them into a meaningful conclusion at the end of each class. I tried to apply what we were discussing to RL.

    I'm fun and sometimes funny; kids like me and I like them. Loved that hour with the students and despised the bureaucracy which overlaid and squelched the learning process.
    "No ray of sunshine is ever lost, but the green which it awakes into existence needs time to sprout, and it is not always granted to the sower to see the harvest. All work that is worth anything is done in faith." - Albert Schweitzer

  9. #9

    Default

    I'm ENFP.

    My teaching style is really laid back, interactive, personal, and I tend to think on the fly. Work a lot one on one with people, and work on a pretty high connection level with students; like get to know each student, and adapt to each student's style of learning. I'm very non-authoritarian, and usually meet students on a level playing field. I break quite a few of the set teaching guidelines also.

    I always think of Robbin Williams in Dead Poets Society as a good example of the ENFP type teacher. Reinforce the imaginative side of the students, and to a point let them lead and move beyond the rules of the classroom. Sometimes completely ignore the rules of the classroom. (I'm a little saner than Robbin Williams though)
    Freude, schöner Götterfunken Tochter aus Elysium, Wir betreten feuertrunken, Himmlische, dein Heiligtum! Deine Zauber binden wieder Was die Mode streng geteilt; Alle Menschen werden Brüder, Wo dein sanfter Flügel weilt.

  10. #10
    movin melodies kiddykat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    MBTI
    ENFP
    Enneagram
    4, 7
    Socionics
    IEE
    Posts
    1,115

    Default

    Back in the days, I used to teach an after school program for elementary school kids and then in college, I tutored math to adults and people my age..

    My teaching style was more about really listening to each student and really giving them quality time. Everyone's personalities different. Some people require more of a personal kind of communication. Some people are a bit more impersonal, straightforward, wanna get things done 'now' kind of attitude. So it takes some adjusting for each personality type.

    With kids, I think it's a more sensitive approach. There are some kids who are the *bullying* types, who are popular and know how to kiss butt, so they'll play politics (yes- kids are just as smart, they can be just as conniving- these kids grow up to be politicians), so I have to be aware of that and make sure that the target of their bullying gets a fair chance, too. Addressing boundaries is important just as much as validation. So it's fair to really listen to all sides. They all need to be 'heard.'

    Teaching really is a hard job. I commend teachers. They get paid way too little for the time and effort they put in. It really is more than a full-time job.

    Lastly, it's also important to make learning a fun experience. Kids actively learn when they're having fun. It's good to break the ice by getting them to do something exciting *together* as a way to enhance the group experience, to promote teamwork, unity. It's also beneficial to get them to laugh at themselves so they're not too hard on themselves. When they take things lightly, the build self-esteem, which ultimately leads them to want to learn more. Sometimes, this also requires a mixture between goofiness and seriousness on the teacher's part. Teaching truly is an art. Good Luck!

Similar Threads

  1. [MBTItm] Teaching styles
    By DreamBeliever in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 04-04-2015, 01:46 AM
  2. Teaching/Learning Styles and Type
    By BlueScreen in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 11-20-2010, 10:32 PM
  3. [INFP] Questions for INFPs about INFPs
    By marm in forum The NF Idyllic (ENFP, INFP, ENFJ, INFJ)
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 01-02-2010, 01:48 AM
  4. [Fe] Teaching an INFP to better use Fe
    By TheEmeraldCanopy in forum The NF Idyllic (ENFP, INFP, ENFJ, INFJ)
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 10-16-2009, 03:12 PM
  5. [INFP] INFP-style economics: give banks a big hug
    By speculative in forum The NF Idyllic (ENFP, INFP, ENFJ, INFJ)
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-18-2008, 04:35 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO