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  1. #11
    Blah Orangey's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the replies . I will get back with something more substantive to say in response later, but for now I just want to bump the thread.

    Actually, I would like to remark on the similarity of the responses so far. It seems that most of you prefer to be non-authoritarian and humorous (which I suppose I could have guessed myself), but I would still like to know how it 'feels' to you when you do it. Do you have to have an organized plan to be comfortable lecturing? Do you feel insecure in front of the students? Do you prefer lecturing to pure discussion (I'm thinking of the formats where you're in a circle and all that goes on is group discussion, which may or may not correspond to your plan for the lesson)? How do you deal with silences during discussion, if you have any?

    Anyway, I appreciate the responses so far, thanks.
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  2. #12
    movin melodies kiddykat's Avatar
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    -Hey, No problem..

    .. It really depends on the teaching environment and grade level. I know that in Cali, the k-6th grade level (perhaps even k-12), teachers are required to write up 'lesson plans,' which are basically packets that include an ENTIRE detailed, step-by-step outline of the lesson objectives and required materials. Takes forever to write one on top of grading papers. In that sense, it's pretty structured and unspontaneous. With kids, I took more of an informal approach. Yes- it's intimidating, especially not taking an authoritative role. It has its consequences. Keep in mind different types of student behaviors (ex- instrumental & hostile aggression) in order to set appropriate boundaries.

    Maybe these forums can offer some more in depth information:
    A to Z Teacher Stuff Forum
    Teacher Focus

  3. #13
    On a mission Usehername's Avatar
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    INFP (heavy on all 4 letters; really unbalanced guy though kind):

    *Let people quietly whisper while he was talking but was utterly offended when a student was talking and another student was whispering during class (he stopped everyone and took a moment to make it clear that "If you're going to talk over me, fine. But don't talk over your classmates. That is tasteless and completely disrespectful. You can leave the classroom if you're going to do that."

    *Took loads of time to provide insightful and extremely thorough comments on papers and marked them very quickly for us to learn from for the next assignment

    *Was all about class discussion, though he did have his long and passionate didactic moments

    *Had created a few enemies by the end of the term (again, he was very unbalanced with his 4 letters) because people had a really difficult time seeing where he was coming from, so they took things personally that really were just heavily INFP perspectives meant to be helpful and NF and all that. I taught some people MBTI and 3 of the "troublemakers" were like, "Oh. Well, if he really sees it this way, I totally see why he would react like that. I guess I can be more respectful to him in turn, then."
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  4. #14
    Blah Orangey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Viv View Post
    -Hey, No problem..

    .. It really depends on the teaching environment and grade level. I know that in Cali, the k-6th grade level (perhaps even k-12), teachers are required to write up 'lesson plans,' which are basically packets that include an ENTIRE detailed, step-by-step outline of the lesson objectives and required materials. Takes forever to write one on top of grading papers. In that sense, it's pretty structured and unspontaneous. With kids, I took more of an informal approach. Yes- it's intimidating, especially not taking an authoritative role. It has its consequences. Keep in mind different types of student behaviors (ex- instrumental & hostile aggression) in order to set appropriate boundaries.

    Maybe these forums can offer some more in depth information:
    A to Z Teacher Stuff Forum
    Teacher Focus
    Thanks for the information. I'm not really looking for any particular solutions here (though I see that it is a useful side-effect of the thread)...I just know that these are typical issues that teachers face, and I wanted to hear about the specific internal feelings or thoughts that go on with INFP's when they handle them. I'm really trying to compare it to what I experience internally when I face similar situations.

    Thanks for that, usehername. That's interesting that the MBTI information made them less irate.
    Artes, Scientia, Veritasiness

  5. #15
    Seriously Delirious Udog's Avatar
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    Do you have to have an organized plan to be comfortable lecturing?
    Yes. I could and would get off topic, but I needed that plan to keep my bearings. The one class where I had a 'looser' agenda didn't turn out so well.

    Do you feel insecure in front of the students?
    Public speaking isn't my strong suit, so that caused me some angst. However, I was secure in my authority, and actually the public speaking was easier than if I were giving a presentation to my peers.

    Do you prefer lecturing to pure discussion (I'm thinking of the formats where you're in a circle and all that goes on is group discussion, which may or may not correspond to your plan for the lesson)?
    The material didn't really lend itself out to that. If I were to teach again, I'd probably throw that in there somewhat.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Orangey View Post
    Thanks for all the replies . I will get back with something more substantive to say in response later, but for now I just want to bump the thread.

    Actually, I would like to remark on the similarity of the responses so far. It seems that most of you prefer to be non-authoritarian and humorous (which I suppose I could have guessed myself), but I would still like to know how it 'feels' to you when you do it. Do you have to have an organized plan to be comfortable lecturing? Do you feel insecure in front of the students? Do you prefer lecturing to pure discussion (I'm thinking of the formats where you're in a circle and all that goes on is group discussion, which may or may not correspond to your plan for the lesson)? How do you deal with silences during discussion, if you have any?

    Anyway, I appreciate the responses so far, thanks.
    I like to know the topics down to first principles. And like to have the key formulas at my disposal. After that I just work freely depending on what is happening. It can be very reactive. I don't feel insecure in front of students, but feel like I'm not teaching them as well as I could when I have to speak to the whole class in a formal way. It feels really impersonal.

    I don't mind group discussions because I can just throw in a comment occasionally to change the direction. It's sort of second nature for an ENFP. I don't mind silences, but if I'm a little disinterested and there is silence, I'm not really as assertive as I should be. If there is something to say though I'll get discussion going again. If you've met many ENFPs, you'll know we can be hard to shut up.
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  7. #17
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    I'm a 28 year-old male INFP and taught 6th grade for two consecutive years last year in a Title 1 elementary k-6 school. It was insanely difficult and although meaningful, I felt like I was drowning in all the details. In order to succeed and keep up, I felt like I had to disown my personality type and become something different, something more "J" like. I thrived on teaching writing and group discussions, but oftentimes the pressures for test scores forced me to teach the formulas rather than the process of learning how to learn, the exploration, and the fun! Internally, I felt like a wreck when dealing with student behavior. Everything felt so personal to me and like someone said earlier, I was most upset when students would show disrespect to one another. Externally, I had my systems, and was pretty consistent but i felt robotic and lifeless. Exposing my "real" self felt way too unsafe, so I took on an exterior of indifference, strictness, organization, and structure. Unfortunately my students didn't get to see much of my humor which is a big part of me. I would say I was a good teacher but didn't feel like myself. I have taken the year off and have decided to try to get into school counseling - something that feels like a much better fit.

  8. #18
    likes this gromit's Avatar
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    I taught Sunday School for several years, not the same as being a school teacher. There were lessons manuals we were supposed to teach from, but sometimes I just played games with the kids or adapted it more to their circumstances, focusing on being a good person, sticking up for yourself, working in school, etc. A lot of the times the example stories included in the lesson were cheesy/ridiculous, particularly considering the kinds of home life and economic backgrounds these kids came from.

    I just wanted them to have a positive experience and not be mean to each other. The kids were so fun though, and made me so happy, and said some of the funniest things. I did really like it, even though they were pretty crazy and pretty much would have been climbing all over the walls if they’d had their way. Disciplining them was one of the hardest parts to me. I wonder if I’d be better at it now though.
    Your kisses, sweeter than honey. But guess what, so is my money.

  9. #19
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    I can tell you what people think of me when I teach my pupils of 60+ in age in computer. I leave no place for people to feel stupid about their mistakes or fears in exploration. Infact I usually have them leave behind those thoughts as quickly as possible, so they can focus on what they want to learn. My pupils have commented that I posses allot of patience, and they do not feel rushed to do something. And I challenge them to recreate certain conditions with only their recent memory or self written notes to guide them.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pitseleh View Post
    From my experience, they tend to be (I have had 2 INFP English teachers: a male- 2 years, a female- 1 semester):
    very random in discussions... never knew where they would go next.
    Lenient
    Laidback
    strict when grading papers-perfectionists
    truly interested in getting to know students (fairly good at reading people)
    open-minded
    non-conformist- never really had traditional book work
    sensitive to the emotional energy in a room
    calm demeanor/low- energy
    hidden deepness inside (cheesy, I know)
    soft spoken
    thoughtful
    passionate/strong opinions
    disorganized
    try to make the students see from multiple perspectives
    they wanted to have an impact on their students like teaching was their cause

    The male teacher talked a lot about things like the purpose of life, love, death, rejection, epistemology. I guess,in short, the deeper things in life.


    I'm not sure if this is what you're exactly looking for... some points may be a bit irrelevant, sorry.

    This, in my experience

    I think that INFPs take on a separate persona when they are teaching (i.e. talking about their strengths). They will strive for perfection and expect the same of their students/others in the field. In unrelated conversations, however, they are very laid back and easy to get along with.

    I know from a friend who is starting to lecture on highly technical stuff

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