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  1. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by YourLocalJesus View Post
    The biggest problem isn't introversion. The biggest problem for any feeling-type will be to overcome their black-and-white view on things and be able to look at things a little more detatched.
    Actually, being not detached can make a great teacher. It all depends if school is about giving marks, or educating people. Because if it is the latter, a connection to and understanding of the student is paramount.
    Freude, schöner Götterfunken Tochter aus Elysium, Wir betreten feuertrunken, Himmlische, dein Heiligtum! Deine Zauber binden wieder Was die Mode streng geteilt; Alle Menschen werden Brüder, Wo dein sanfter Flügel weilt.

  2. #32
    Senior Member the state i am in's Avatar
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    i could see myself some day coaching a team sport that was extremely tactical like soccer more than actually school teacher teaching. in soccer you have to teach. you help each person understand the big picture. it's interesting, plus kids pull out some crazy creative moves that make your jaw drop.

  3. #33
    Dali
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    I'm clearly not INFJ; I once considered going into English Lit (which I'm good at) then eventually teaching it at a secondary or tertiary level.

    I changed my mind after realising I'd probably be in jail for homicide by a week's end.

  4. #34
    Riva
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    i also want to become a teacher. i wanna beat the crap out of my students for small small things just like the way i was beaten up by my teachers.
    note - i am from sri lanka. and the teachers are allowed to hit you.
    i know its off topic. but i couldn't help myself.

    back to the topic, i think INFJs would make good teachers. my gut speaking.

  5. #35
    ish red no longer *sad* nightning's Avatar
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    The biggest problem I see with INFJ teachers is the stress level/ constant energy drain of teaching kids day in and day out.

    Every kid in the class become a project for the INFJ to work on. With a large class size, there's simply no way you can put that much attention onto every one. Yet the INFJ might feel the need for "perfection". They see it as their personal responsibility to make sure each kid will reach their full potential.

    Clearly it's an impossible goal. INFJs are only human... but it doesn't stop them from trying. Hence the burn-out.
    My stuff (design & other junk) lives here: http://nnbox.ca

  6. #36
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    I enjoy teaching at the more advanced level, but I've found it to be nerve-wracking at times. I don't teach anymore and I've never taught full time, but before I went to law school I taught LSAT prep classes. I would always get soooooo nervous before class and try to do everything I could to prepare, even though there really was only so much I could do. I just never felt ready. Once the class started, though, it was always fun and energizing.

    Ironically I had a much harder time with one-on-one tutoring. I enjoyed the actual sessions and felt more comfortable than in the classroom, but I felt so responsible for my students' success that if they didn't do well it would just bring me down for days. I still feel guilty thinking about some of my students who didn't do well, even though they clearly were not meant to practice law. I just wanted them to succeed and felt so badly when they beat themselves up.

  7. #37
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    I teach cosmetology. I am in the freshman room. We have structured theory in the morning and hands on in the afternoons. Theory includes interpersonal communication, ethics, client psychology, anatomy, chemisty, beauty (hair, nails, & skin) and how to pass state board with client safety. I share my personal expiriences in the salon, and as new students, they are excited about their new careers. I've been a stylist for 10 years, great for introverts because listening and playing counselor is part of the job. I give a demo in the afternoons (showcasing my artist skills, giving pointers, and modeling client consultation skills in scripted but relaxed questioning). Then the students work on manikins or each other while i sit quietly and grade tests/papers or make lesson plans. Because it's a creative field, i work with a lot of quirky fun types...with a couple of entp comedians in every class. I also work only 3 days teaching and 2 days in the salon, so i can take care of my clients.

  8. #38
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    I love it, but i definately cherish my days off.

  9. #39
    From the Undertow CuriousFeeling's Avatar
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    I think one of my struggles as an instructor is when I get off on an Ni-Ti loop when teaching a concept, and I end up teaching students way too much information than what they need, or end up sounding monotone; when in actuality, I'm carefully thinking out what I am going to say in a lecture. I also get quite passionate about science, and it kind of shows in the amount of content I want to teach my students, and unfortunately not all students will share that passion. I suppose it's almost like I become a preacher of science.

    But I absolutely love it when I teach students a topic, and then the gears start turning, and they ask very relevant and deep questions about the topic, or relate it to their everyday lives. This is when I know I've got my students interested. It's just called getting them to be quiet so then we can continue the lesson. Rather than shouting over students to tell them to be quiet, I just give them the Ni death-ray stare, and it works!
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

    Johari/Nohari

    “Thoughts are the shadows of our feelings -- always darker, emptier and simpler.”
    ― Friedrich Nietzsche




  10. #40
    Diving into Ni-space Crescent Fresh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nightning View Post
    The biggest problem I see with INFJ teachers is the stress level/ constant energy drain of teaching kids day in and day out.

    Every kid in the class become a project for the INFJ to work on. With a large class size, there's simply no way you can put that much attention onto every one. Yet the INFJ might feel the need for "perfection". They see it as their personal responsibility to make sure each kid will reach their full potential.

    Clearly it's an impossible goal. INFJs are only human... but it doesn't stop them from trying. Hence the burn-out.
    Yes. Yes. Yes!!!

    I have to say teaching is such a precious gift as I happened to be good at connecting to many of them. The problem is I always felt bad about not able to help as many students as to reach their full potential as it requires extra and additional time to bond with them. I'm a firm believer that most students didn't or couldn't realize their own inner-quality without a supervisor help them along the way.

    The problem to this is I felt immensely a great deal amount of responsibility that I ended up ignoring my own needs. Very often, I have to sacrificing my sleeping hours just to do the "extra" work for offering them various opportunities. For example, our school assigned each teacher to pick one kids for speech contest, I would end up picking five in the end. It's actually quite frustrating to constantly hear from my coworkers labelled me as a workaholic or just purely being ambitious; whereas my true intention is I want to offer as much opportunities to kids who I felt there's a indefinite amount of potential within them.

    Anyhow, I ended my first career as a teacher (taught for four years) and I'm now in the middle of a changing a different career. I do love teaching and still miss it fondly, though I just couldn't afford to keep feeling burning out by being too harsh on myself by offering as much or equal opportunities to all students.

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