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  1. #21
    Senior Member INFJ*'s Avatar
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    I never pictured myself as a teacher. I never wanted to at all, but I'm a teacher now by a total coincidence and I'm loving it. Most students who took courses with me come back to ask for me whenever they want to continue to advanced levels. All my students are adults and the sessions are one-on-one sessions. So it works great for my introverted side. ( I teach a language) some of the feedbacks I got:

    "You're the best teacher I have here." my boss

    Some of my students:

    "How long have you been doing this? Seems like you've been doing it forever" E.

    "You're a natural teacher" A.

    "You're a real teacher. It's like you were born to do this" D.

    "A substitute? No, I don't want another teacher, I want you. " M.

    "I enjoy every moment in your class" K.

    "I learn so much from you." C.

    "When I come back I will ask for you" J.

    "When I came back, I asked for you they told me you're not available then I canceled the course." T.


    I'm shocked myself.
    Let me melt in your soul. Slowly, slowly, slowly..


    I - 44
    N- 64
    F- 64
    J- 11

    4w3

  2. #22
    Senior Member penelope's Avatar
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    I worked at a daycare center for over a year, and while it was easily the most stressful job I'd ever had (and imagine I'd ever have in my lifetime), it was extremely rewarding. I get such fulfillment over working with children and watching them learn new things and see their eyes light up over the experience.

    I also taught at an art camp over the summer, and I found that I was an excellent teacher and ran the classroom really well (J-type, haha) due to my organization. I interact really well with students/children.

    I originally went to college to become an art teacher, but I changed my major to painting, though I still think I'd make an excellent art teacher. It's a profession I always imagined I'd end up in.

  3. #23
    Senior Member Eileen's Avatar
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    I'm an INFJ teacher. The introversion is tough. I'm exhausted from the job--and if you're not good at cutting off bullshit, it can be very demoralizing in addition to being just normally taxing.

    When I get to teach, I find it very energizing. But teaching's not all there is to the job. Tonight I am kind of fantasizing about getting out and doing a masters in counseling.
    INFJ

    "I can never be what I ought to be until you are what you ought to be. You can never be what you ought to be until I am what I ought to be. This is the interrelated structure of reality." -Martin Luther King, Jr.

  4. #24
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    I had a INFJ university lecturer for four years and he was excellent. INFJ's as educators touch all the bases and make sure you get a good foundation and a good education. They are great at assessment and give very pointed feedback to you on what it is you need to look to and what it is you need to develop, and how you might do that.

    So I think that can be adapted to any teaching situation.
    Speak Truthfully, Act Righteously

  5. #25
    Senior Member gloomy-optimist's Avatar
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    I think I read somewhere that INFJs are the best NF type when it comes to seeing a situation objectively (that might be because of our tertiary Ti function or something, who knows).
    If that's the case, then they might be good teachers because they have the NF caring-about-people thing going on for them, and at the same time still be able to see from a different view point, such as that of the student.

  6. #26
    Senior Member Kestrel's Avatar
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    INFJ's are hands-down the best 1 on 1 or small group teachers there are. Of this, I have no doubt. We're patient and can tell when someone doesn't understand something completely just by looking at their face or body language. This is obviously more difficult with larger classes.

    Also, I've also always had problems with speaking in front of large groups of people. In order to work, I always feel like I need some kind of feedback from the audience - whether it's words or body language. When I gave presentations in college, I found it easier not to look at anyone. Seeing even one bored, lifeless face was distracting and unnerving for me.
    I-44 N-88 F-62 J-67

    A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty. -Winston Churchill

  7. #27
    Senior Member the state i am in's Avatar
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    i always assumed i would become a professor in cultural studies or comparative literature. i think it is still likely, but being away from the "it's all academic" pedants and grammar police regulating each academic discourse so guarded and conservative and protecting their position and the bureaucratic institutional frustrations and obvious inconsistencies in our educational system has made me second-guess. plus i am greedy and hungry for recognition bigger than academic conferences and end of year teacher awards. listen to me, everyone! if i were an enfj i'd be shouting from a pulpit...

  8. #28
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    Weird this topic came up. I was just thinking[fantasizing] about teaching a few days ago. I think it would be an awesome profession for the infj. I feel like I'd be so much more inclined to teach the students and relate to them and connect to them unlike most teachers today. Oh well. Maybe someday.

  9. #29
    Senior Member hokie912's Avatar
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    I work as an in-school therapist with elementary and middle school students, and while I love that, I've come to decide that I wouldn't be fulfilled teaching that age group. I prefer the one-on-one or small group interactions with my kids rather than an entire classroom setting. I see teachers who are wonderful, but it's something like...the way you need to teach elementary school students is almost incompatible with the way I think about and learn things. I mentally jump around and learn concepts that I would have trouble communicating in a stepwise fashion. Which in itself would probably make me a bad teacher. I could more easily see myself teaching high school or college courses.

    I think I remember reading that intuitives are more likely to teach advanced courses, while sensors predominate in early childhood education.

  10. #30
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    Yea I read that too - about sensors predominating in early childhood education and intuitives in advanced courses. I can understand why... After all, when you are a kid, there are lots of drill exercises like learning verb tenses, multiplication tables, etc, often done in a rote manner. Intuitives on the other hand try to teach things globally. At least, I do.

    And I get disappointed when I get blank stares from those pupils who want to think strictly in terms of 'step 1, step 2, step 3' and cannot take a bird's eye's view and then zoom in. On the other hand, I find it extremely rewarding when teaching the advanced classes when there are INTJ and INTP because those are the ones to whom you can just give the over-arching principle and they've already mapped out the method or their own method in their mind and you can actually see their faces light up once they get it in an 'aha' moment. And they get to be confident in their own thinking. To such pupils, no problem is too complicated because their thinking is not encapsulated but freed. They easily see connections between various topics.

    The challenge for me is to get the sensors to think a bit like the intuitives and the intuitives to learn to check their work like the sensors. And for me to adapt my teaching method and make it fit all types.

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