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  1. #11
    Senior Member JivinJeffJones's Avatar
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    Dostoevsky? Meh. Chicks go for that? He has a cool name, I'll admit...

  2. #12
    now! in shell form INA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JivinJeffJones View Post
    Dostoevsky? Meh. Chicks go for that? He has a cool name, I'll admit...
    We are not chicks. We are NTs.

  3. #13
    Senior Member JivinJeffJones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IF3157 View Post
    We are not chicks. We are NTs.
    NTs = people (occasionally female) with unexciting taste in authors?

  4. #14
    now! in shell form INA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JivinJeffJones View Post
    NTs = people (occasionally female) with unexciting taste in authors?
    Excuse me while I vomit on your Dean Coontz. Or is Dan Brown more your speed?

  5. #15
    Oberon
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    Mmmm.... keep talking!

    *bats Neutral Good lashes of Charisma*
    While you're batting, have you seen the Crystal Pig anywhere? I'm getting hungry...

  6. #16
    Senior Member JivinJeffJones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IF3157 View Post
    Excuse me while I vomit on your Dean Coontz. Or is Dan Brown more your speed?
    Dean Coontz can be very erotic.

  7. #17
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JivinJeffJones View Post
    NTs = people (occasionally female) with unexciting taste in authors?
    unexciting? I'm not even sure the American Movie Rating system could handle some of the things in D's books. For example, from The Brothers Karamazov (whited out to protect from more delicate eyes):

    "But I've still better things about children. I've collected a great, great deal about Russian children, Alyosha. There was a little girl of five who was hated by her father and mother, 'most worthy and respectable people, of good education and breeding.' You see, I must repeat again, it is a peculiar characteristic of many people, this love of torturing children, and children only. To all other types of humanity these torturers behave mildly and
    benevolently, like cultivated and humane Europeans; but they are very fond of tormenting children, even fond of children themselves in that sense. it's just their defencelessness that tempts the tormentor, just the angelic confidence of the child who has no refuge and no appeal, that sets his vile blood on fire. In every man, of course, a demon lies hidden- the demon of rage, the demon of lustful heat at the screams of the tortured victim, the demon of lawlessness let off the chain, the demon of diseases that follow on
    vice, gout, kidney disease, and so on.

    "This poor child of five was subjected to every possible torture by those cultivated parents. They beat her, thrashed her, kicked her for no reason till her body was one bruise. Then, they went to greater refinements of cruelty- shut her up all night in the cold and frost in a privy, and because she didn't ask to be taken up at night (as though a child of five sleeping its angelic, sound sleep could be trained to wake and ask), they smeared her face and filled her mouth with excrement, and it was her mother, her mother did this. And that mother could sleep, hearing the poor child's groans! Can you understand why a little creature, who can't even understand what's done to her, should beat her little aching heart with her tiny fist in the dark and the cold, and weep her meek unresentful tears to dear, kind God to protect her? Do you understand that, friend and brother, you pious and humble novice? Do you understand why this infamy must be and is permitted? Without it, I am told, man could not have existed on earth, for he could not have known good and evil. Why should he know that diabolical good and evil when it costs so much? Why, the whole world of knowledge is not worth that child's prayer to dear, kind God'! I say nothing of the sufferings of grown-up people, they have eaten the apple, damn them, and the devil take them all! But these little ones! I am making you suffer, Alyosha, you are not yourself. I'll leave off if you like."

    "Nevermind. I want to suffer too," muttered Alyosha.

    "One picture, only one more, because it's so curious, so characteristic, and I have only just read it in some collection of Russian antiquities. I've forgotten the name. I must look it up. It was in the darkest days of serfdom at the beginning of the century, and long live the Liberator of the People! There was in those days a general of aristocratic connections, the owner of great estates, one of those men- somewhat exceptional, I believe, even then- who,
    retiring from the service into a life of leisure, are convinced that they've earned absolute power over the lives of their subjects. There were such men then. So our general, settled on his property of two thousand souls, lives in pomp, and domineers over his poor neighbours as though they were dependents and buffoons. He has kennels of hundreds of hounds and nearly a hundred dog-boys- all mounted, and in uniform. One day a serf-boy, a little child of eight, threw a stone in play and hurt the paw of the general's favourite hound. 'Why is my favourite dog lame?' He is told that the boy threw a stone that hurt the dog's paw. 'So you did it.' The general looked the child up and down. 'Take him.' He was taken- taken from his mother and kept shut up all night. Early that morning the general comes out on horseback, with the hounds, his dependents, dog-boys, and huntsmen, all mounted around him in full hunting parade. The servants are summoned for their edification, and in front of them all stands the mother of the child. The child is brought from the lock-up. It's a gloomy, cold, foggy, autumn day, a capital day for hunting. The general orders the child to be undressed; the child is stripped naked. He shivers, numb with terror, not daring to cry.... 'Make him run,' commands the general. 'Run! run!' shout the dog-boys. The boy runs.... 'At him!' yells the general, and he sets the whole pack of hounds on the child. The hounds catch him, and tear him to pieces before his mother's eyes!... I believe the general was afterwards declared incapable of administering his estates. Well- what did he deserve? To be shot? To be shot for the satisfaction of our moral feelings? Speak, Alyosha!

    "To be shot," murmured Alyosha, lifting his eyes to Ivan with a pale, twisted smile.

    "Bravo!" cried Ivan delighted. "If even you say so... You're a pretty monk! So there is a little devil sitting in your heart, Alyosha Karamazov!"

    "What I said was absurd, but-"

    "That's just the point, that 'but'!" cried Ivan. "Let me tell you, novice, that the absurd is only too necessary on earth. The world stands on absurdities, and perhaps nothing would have come to pass in it without them. We know what we know!"
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  8. #18
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oberon View Post
    While you're batting, have you seen the Crystal Pig anywhere? I'm getting hungry...
    Too crunchy, Preston.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  9. #19
    Senior Member JivinJeffJones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    unexciting? I'm not even sure the American Movie Rating system could handle some of the things in D's books. For example, from The Brothers Karamazov (whited out to protect from more delicate eyes):
    [unexciting prose]
    Maybe that was edgy in 1880...

  10. #20
    Oberon
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    Quote Originally Posted by JivinJeffJones View Post
    Maybe that was edgy in 1880...
    Jennifer, if you want him to respond, you have to give it to him as a graphic novel.

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